Saturday, April 21, 2018

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril!


The Ninjas, "Doris" from Platypus (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary:
"My time machine is the coolest thing,
It's the best machine that you've ever seen,
It's lean and mean and neon green,
Wait 'til you've been in my time machine,
Come along with me and I'll show you how much fun time travel can be!

"Even though my time machine doesn't work anymore
You'll always be my very favorite dinosaur,
Oh, Doris,
My brontosaurus!…"

Friday, April 20, 2018

Bonus! Song o' the Day: SKApril


Reel Big Fish, "Beer" from Turn the Radio Off (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary:
"Maybe some day I'll think of what to say,
Maybe next time I'll remember what to do,
She looks like heaven, maybe this is hell,
She said she'd do it all again, she promised not to tell…"

Saints + Scripture: Eastertide — Better Late than Never

'Tis the festival of Saint Cædwalla, Confessor (circa 658-689; also spelt Cadwallon, etc.; A.K.A. Peter), King of Wessex: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Agnes of Montepulciano, Abbess, O.P. (1268-1317): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Blesseds James Bell, Priest, & John Finch, Martyrs (died 1584), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I: Martyr-link Juliett Bravo & Wikipedia-link Juliett Bravo, Martyr-link Juliett Foxtrot & Wikipedia-link Juliett Foxtrot.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Maurice MacKenraghty, Priest & Martyr (circa 1500-1585, also spelt Muiris mac Ionrachtaigh), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I, one of the Irish Martyrs: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyr-link Irish & Wikipedia-link Irish.

'Tis also the festival of Blesseds Richard Sergeant & William Thomson, Priests & Martyrs (died 1586), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I, two of the Eighty-five Martyrs of England & Wales: Martyr-link Romeo Sierra & Wikipedia-link, Martyr-link Whiskey Tango; Martyr-link LXXXV & Wikipedia-link LXXXV.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Easter Weekday
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter nine, verses one thru twenty;
Psalm One Hundred Seventeen, verses one(b/c) & two;
The Gospel according to John, chapter six, verses fifty-two thru fifty-nine.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, today’s Gospel declares that the Word really became flesh. Why has the Incarnation been resisted from the very beginning? Why is the extension of the Incarnation, which is the Eucharist, still such a source of division?

I think it has to do with flesh. God became one of us, as close to us as blood and muscle and bone. It is no longer correct to say simply that God is in his heaven and we are on the earth. It is not correct to say simply that God is spirit and we are matter. Matter has been invaded by spirit. In Jesus, God became flesh, and, more to the point, he invites us to eat his Body and drink his Blood. But that means that he wants us to take him into ourselves.

"Now, wait a minute!" many people think. That’s a little too close for comfort, for it means that he wants to be Lord of my flesh and my bones, that he wants to move into every nook and cranny of my life. My work, my recreation, my sexual life, my life of play—all those fleshy things that I do—he wants to be Lord of all of that! That’s precisely right.
Video reflection by Father Praveen Lakkisetti: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Papal Quote o' the Day
"The true problem of our time is the 'Crisis of God,' the absence of God, disguised by an empty religiosity."
—Pope Benedict XVI (born 1927, reigned 2005-2013)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"It is true that His Cross has been with me from the cradle, but for that Cross He has given me a passionate love."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"You have made us for Yourself, Lord, & our hearts are restless until they rest in You."
—St. Augustine of Hippo, Doctor of the Church (354-430, feast day: 28 August)

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril!


King Apparatus, "Five Good Reasons" from King Apparatus (The Last Angry Man)

Skammentary:
"He had five good reasons and they clenched so tight,
Five good reasons and they clenched so tight,
Five good reasons and they clenched so tight,
Five good reasons and they clenched so tight…"

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Saints + Scripture: Eastertide

The Popish Plot
Prayer Time Out: "Adoration"

'Tis the festival of Saint Crescentius of Florence, Deacon (died circa 396): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link (disambiguation, "deacon of Saint Zenobius"); Wikipedia-link Saint Zenobius of Florence.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Ursmar of Lobbes, Bishop & Abbot, O.S.B. (circa 640-713), co-founder of Aulne Abbey: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Abbey.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Ælfheah of Canterbury, Bishop & Martyr, O.S.B. (circa 953-1012; A.K.A. of Winchester, also spelt Alphage), martyred by Viking Danes; abbot of Bath Abbey prior to episcopal consecration: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Abbey.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Leo IX, Pope (1002-1054, "the Pilgrim Pope;" A.K.A. Bruno of Egisheim-Dagsburg), one hundred fifty-second (CLII) Bishop of Rome, who for all his holiness could not prevent the Great Schism: Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Pontiff; Wikipedia-link Schism.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed James Duckett, Martyr (died 1601), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Easter Weekday
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter eight, verses twenty-six thru forty;
Psalm Sixty-six, verses eight & nine, sixteen & seventeen, & twenty;
The Gospel according to John, chapter six, verses forty-four thru fifty-one.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel, Jesus offers himself as food for the soul. There is a great truth revealed in the bread of life discourse: it is the law of the gift. This personal, incarnating God wants to be eaten and drunk, to be radically and fully for the other.

Why were the gods of the ancient world so popular? Because they were projections of ourselves—vain, arrogant, resentful, violent. This means that they put little moral pressure on us. They were frightening but not morally demanding.

But this God who shows that he is totally love, and who wants us to eat and drink him in, is the God who wants us to be like him. As he is food and drink for the world, so we must be food and drink for the world. As he gave himself away utterly, so we must give ourselves away fully.

We’re not to cling to the goods, honors, and values of the world—all those things that aggrandize the ego—but rather give ourselves away. That’s what we learn from the God of the gift.
Video reflection by Fr. Roger Lopez, O.F.M. (Franciscan Media): U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Papal Quote o' the Day
"Real love is demanding. It was for Jesus—our Jesus Himself—who said: 'You are My friends if you do what I command you' (John, 15:14). Love demands effort & a personal commitment to the will of God. It means discipline & sacrifice, but it also means joy & human fulfillment."
—Pope St. John Paul II (the Great, 1920-2005; feast day: 22 October)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"It is true, you are the Mother of Jesus, but you have given Him to me; & He, from the Cross, has given you to be our Mother—thus we are richer than you!"
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Love, to be real, it must cost—it must hurt—it must empty us of self."
—St. Teresa of Calcutta (A.K.A. Mother Teresa, 1910-1997; feast day: 5 September)

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril!


Edna's Goldfish, "If You Want It" from Before You Knew Better… (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary: Edna's Goldfish were one of the shortest-lived third-wave ska bands, forming in 1997 & breaking up in 2000, marking them as polar opposite of stalwarts such as Reel Big Fish (1991-present) & The Mighty Mighty Bosstones (1983-2003, 2007-present). A shame, because they had some good stuff, like "If You Want It," but I suppose they just didn't want it.

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

The Queue

In the fortnight since the last "The Queue" post, I've made steady progress through Perfectly Yourself, reading five of the book's nine lessons, compared to the single lesson I completed in the six weeks of Lent. Bully for me! For those playing the home version of our game, I've read two-thirds of Perfectly Yourself, six of the nine lessons. Therefore, I'm going to push through to the book's conclusion before moving on to another volume.

Recently
Matthew Warner, Messy & Foolish: How to Make a Mess, Be a Fool, and Evangelize the World
Father John Riccardo, Heaven Starts Now: Becoming a Saint Day by Day
Thomas F. Madden, The Crusades Controversy: Setting the Record Straight

Currently
Matthew Kelly, Perfectly Yourself: Discovering God's Dream for You

Presently
Norman Davies, Vanished Kingdoms: The Rise and Fall of States and Nations ***oft delayed***
Pope Francis, Guadete et Exsultate (Rejoice and Be Glad)
Sherry A. Weddell, Forming Intentional Disciples: The Path to Knowing and Following Jesus
William E. Simon Jr., Great Catholic Parishes: How Four Essential Practices Make Them Thrive
Bishop Robert Barron, Seeds of the Word: Finding God in the Culture
Mike Aquilina, Understanding the Mass: 100 Questions, 100 Answers
Xavier Rynne, Vatican Council II
John W. O'Malley, What Happened at Vatican II
Pope Benedict XVI, Deus Caritas Est (God Is Love)
Pope Benedict XVI, Sacramentum Caritatis (The Sacrament of Charity)
Scott Hahn, A Father Who Keeps His Promises: God's Covenant Love in Scripture
Rosario Carello, Pope Francis Takes the Bus and Other Unexpected Stories
Father Mathias D. Thelen, Biblical Foundations for the Role of Healing in Evangelization
Richard Price, Clockers
Sir Richard Francis Burton, translator, "Sinbad the Sailor" from The Arabian Nights
Sir Ernest Shackleton, South: A Memoir of the Endurance Voyage
William F. Buckley Jr., The Unmaking of a Mayor
Margaret MacMillan, Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World
John le Carré, A Legacy of Spies

Saints + Scripture: Eastertide — Better Late than Never

'Tis the festival of Saint Perfectus of Córdoba, Priest & Martyr (died 850), martyred in the reign of the Andalusian emir Abd ar-Rahman II, one of the forty-eight Martyrs of Córdoba: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Giacomo Oldo, Priest, T.O.S.F. (1364-1404, Anglicized as James Oldo): Blessed-link ūnus & Blessed-link duo.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Marie of the Incarnation, Religious, O.C.D. (1566-1618; A.K.A. Barbara Avrillot, Barbara Acarie): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Marie-Anne Blondin, S.S.A. (1809-1890, A.K.A. Esther Blondin), foundress of the Sisters of Saint Anne: Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link S.S.A.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Easter Weekday
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter eight, verses one(b) thru eight;
Psalm Sixty-six, verses one, two, & three(a); four & five; & six & seven(a);
The Gospel according to John, chapter six, verses thirty-five thru forty.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, Joseph Ratzinger said that the soul corresponds to our capacity for relationship to God. We have a whole range of intellectual and relational powers, but beyond them all, we have the capacity to know and love God. And since God is eternal, this power links us to eternity, proving that we are not simply limited to space and time. To say that we are nothing but “bodies” which flourish briefly and then fade away is to miss this dimension of our existence. Instead, we speak of souls and of the enduring existence of those who have gone before us into death.

This is why Jesus speaks so readily of eternal life in today’s Gospel: “For this is the will of my Father, that everyone who sees the Son and believes in him may have eternal life, and I shall raise him on the last day.” There was a great debate in Jesus’ time within Judaism in regard to this question. Many, including the Sadducees, denied the idea of life after death; but others, including the Pharisees, affirmed it.

Jesus clearly sides with those who affirm it, and his own resurrection from the dead demonstrated this belief as emphatically as possible.
Video reflection by Jem Sullivan, Ph.D.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Papal Quote o' the Day
"In vast areas of the earth the faith risks being extinguished, like a flame without fuel. We are facing a profound crisis of faith, a loss of a religious sense which represents one of the greatest challenges for the Church today… The renewed faith must, then, be a priority for the entire Church in our time."
—Pope Benedict XVI (born 1927, reigned 2005-2013)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"O Jesus, I know it, love is repaid by love alone, & so I searched & I found the way to solace my heart by giving you Love for Love."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"We belong to the Church Militant; & she is militant because on earth the powers of darkness are ever restless to encompass her destruction."
—Pope Venerable Pius XII (1876-1958, feast day: 9 October)

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril!


Dance Hall Crashers, "Skinhead B.B.Q." from The Old Record (1989-1992) (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary: Referencing, of course, the ska/punk/reggae/oi!/etc. skinhead subculture, not American journalism's lazy misuse of "skinhead" as a byword for racist thuggery.

Also, of all the songs for which Elyse & Karina sang the lyrics ridiculously quickly, "Skinhead B.B.Q." might well be the quickest. The first stanza is a lyrical blur, only decipherable with patience & care.
"We always need a skinhead barbecue
Back in the month of June
To ward off all the bad feelings
Left over from the fall and spring.
We must rely on common sense
To keep us out of any mess,
Protect all those who do attend
And entertain them 'til the end.

"Why can't all things be simple
Just like a barbecue,
A summer skinhead barbecue,
Why can't all things be simple
Just like a barbecue,
A summer skinhead barbecue,
Someday they will,
Someday they will,
Someday they will.

"Hamburgers and hot dogs, chips and onion dip,
Watermelon and Hawaiian Punch to sip,
Don't forget the Oreos—Double Stuf, of course!
Hamburgers and hot dogs, chips and onion dip,
Watermelon and Hawaiian Punch to sip,
Don't forget the Oreos—Double Stuf, of course!"

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril!


The Selecter, "Three Minute Hero" from Greatest Hits (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary: I'd never heard of The Selecter until they were mentioned in The Mighty Mighty Bosstones' song "Don't Worry Desmond Dekker" (also how I learned of Dekker), one of the new songs on their first post-hiatus album, Medium Rare. This is The Selecter's long overdue SKApril debut & I look forward to spotlighting more of their music in the future, possibly in the SKAfter Party & certainly in SKAprils yet to come.

"Three Minute Hero" is about dreaming of escaping the drudgery of one's workaday life by becoming a rock star, radio hits supposedly averaging about three minutes in duration. Think of it as a 2-Tone precursor to so much of Reel Big Fish's music.

Monday, April 16, 2018

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril!


Derrick Morgan, "Tougher than Tough" from Do the Beng Beng (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary:
"Rougher than rough,
Tougher than tough,
Strong like lion,
We are iron,
Rudies don't fear now, boys,
Rudies don't fear,
Rudies don't fear now, boys,
Rudies don't fear…

"Rougher than rough,
Tougher than tough,
Strong like lion,
We are iron,
Rudies are free, yes, boys,
Rudies are free,
Rudies are free, yes, boys,
Rudies are free…"

Sunday, April 15, 2018

Bonus! Song o' the Day: Midway through SKApril!


Mustard Plug, "Brain on Ska" from Skapocalypse Now! (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary: This is our objective with SKApril, to hook one's brain on ska. "Ska, ska, ska!"

Saints + Scripture: II Sunday of Easter

The Long Road Back, Part III of VI

Sunday, 8 April was the Second Sunday of Easter, the Octave Day of Easter, A.K.A. Divine Mercy Sunday (A.K.A. Quasimodo Sunday): Wikipedia-link Octave & Wikipedia-link Divine Mercy Sunday.


Scripture of That Week
Mass Readings—Second Sunday of Easter or Divine Mercy Sunday
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter four, verses thirty-two thru thirty-five;
Psalm One Hundred Eighteen, verses two, three, & four; thirteen, fourteen, & fifteen; & twenty-two, twenty-three, & twenty-four;
The First Letter of John, chapter five, verses one thru six;
The Gospel according to John, chapter twenty, verses nineteen thru thirty-one.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, our magnificent Gospel today declares that there is no greater manifestation of the divine mercy than the forgiveness of sins. We are in the upper room with the disciples, those who had denied, betrayed, and abandoned their master. Jesus came and stood in their midst. When they saw him, their fear must have intensified; undoubtedly, he was back for revenge.

Instead, he spoke the simple word "Shalom," peace. He showed them his hands and his side, lest they forget what the world (and they) did to him, but he does not follow up with blame or retribution—only a word of mercy.

And then the extraordinary commission: "Receive the Holy Spirit. Whose sins you forgive are forgiven them, and whose sins you retain are retained." Jesus’ mercy is communicated to his disciples, who in turn are sent to communicate it to the world.

This is the foundation for the sacrament of penance, which has existed in the Church from that moment to the present day as the privileged vehicle of the divine mercy.
Video reflection by Father Greg Friedman, O.F.M.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Video reflection by Jeff Cavins: Encountering the Word.

Audio reflection by Scott Hahn, Ph.D.: Breaking the Bread.


Mass Journal: Week Fifteen
Reflection by Matthew Kelly, founder of the Dynamic Catholic Institute:
There are certain disciplines that are associated with the lifestyle of an athlete that could also be compared with the lifestyle of a Christian. Athletes abide by certain diets & adhere to certain training regimens. They don't stay out all night partying, because they know they have to wake early the next morning for training. All these are part of an athlete's lifestyle. So it is with the life of a Christian. There are disciplines & practices that must be embraced & respected if we are to walk faithfully along the path of salvation, fulfill our destiny, become better-versions-of-ourselves each day, & enjoy the happiness God wants to fill us with. Your journey with God will require more discipline than any other quest you will pursue in this life.


Otherwise, 8 April would have been the festival of Saint Walter of Pontoise, Abbot, O.S.B. (circa 1030-1099, A.K.A. Gautier): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Twould also have been the festival of Saint Julie Billiart, Virgin, S.N.D.deN. (1751-1816), foundress of the Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur: Saint-link ūna, Saint-link duæ, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link S.N.D.deN.

'Twould also have been the festival of Blessed August Czartoryski, Priest, S.D.B. (1858-1893): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Twould also have been the festival of Blessed Domingo of the Most Blessed Sacrament, Priest, O.SS.T. (1901-1927, A.K.A. Domingo Iturrate Zubero): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

Papal Quote o' That Day
"Now, though the era of persecution is gone, yet our peace has its martyrdom, because though we bend not the neck to the sword, yet with a spiritual weapon we slay fleshly desires in our hearts."
—Pope St. Gregory I the Great, Doctor of the Church (540-604, feast: 3 September)
Little Flower Quote o' That Day
"I want to be charitable in my thoughts toward others at all times, for Jesus has said: 'Judge not, & you shall not be judged.'"
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' That Day
"Let us be filled with confidence & let us discard everything so as to be able to meet this onslaught. Christ has equipped us with weapons more splendid than gold, more resistant than steel, weapons more fiery than any flame & lighter than the slightest breeze… These are weapons of a totally new kind, for they have been forged for a previously unheard-of type of combat. I, who am a mere man, find myself called upon to deal blows to demons; I, who am clothed in flesh, find myself at war with incorporeal powers."
—St. John Chrysostom, Doctor of the Church (349-407, feast day: 13 September)

Saints + Scripture: III Sunday of Easter

Better Late than Never

'Tis the Third Sunday of Easter (A.K.A. Jubilate Sunday): Wikipedia-link Eastertide & Wikipedia-link Jubilate.


Scripture of the Week
Mass Readings—Third Sunday of Easter
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter three, verses thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, seventeen, eighteen, & nineteen;
Psalm Four, verses two, four, seven & eight, & nine;
The First Letter of John, chapter two, verses one thru five(a);
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter twenty-four, verses thirty-five thru forty-eight.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel, the risen Jesus appears to his eleven disciples. He does not appear as a Platonic soul, a ghost, or a hallucination. Instead, he can be touched and seen, has flesh and bones, and can consume baked fish. Against all their expectations, a dead man had returned, through the power of God, bodily and objectively from death.

Even while insisting on this bodiliness and objectivity, we must not go to the opposite extreme. It really was Jesus, the crucified, who had returned from the dead. But he did not come back simply resuscitated to the confines of ordinary space and time. He was not, in a word, like Lazarus, the daughter of Jairus, or the son of the widow of Naim, all people who had been raised only to die again.

Instead, Jesus’ body is transformed and transfigured, independent of the strictures of space and time; it is, in Paul’s language, a “spiritual” body. And the point is this: he has triumphed over death and all that pertains to death. His resurrected body is a foretaste and promise of what God intends for all of us.
Video reflection by Father Greg Friedman, O.F.M.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Video reflection by Jeff Cavins: Encountering the Word.

Audio reflection by Scott Hahn, Ph.D.: Breaking the Bread.


Mass Journal: Week Sixteen
Reflection by Matthew Kelly, founder of the Dynamic Catholic Institute:
For the first Christians, Christianity was a lifestyle. They shared a common life. Living in a community, they often worked together, prayed together, & studied the Scriptures together. Their faith was the center of their lives; it affected everything they did. They shared meals together, played together, & cared for each other in sickness. They allowed the principles of the Gospel to guide them in the activities of their daily lives. They comforted each other in their afflictions & challenged each other to live the Gospel more fully. There was unity & continuity between their professional lives & their family lives, between their social lives & their family lives, between their social lives & their lives as members of the Church. They allowed the Holy Spirit to guide them in all they did. Then, at the pinnacle of their common life, they celebrated Eucharist together.


Otherwise, 15 April would be the festival of Saint Padarn, Bishop & Abbot (circa 482-565, of Wales, of Avranches; also spelt Paternus), founder of the Abbey of Llanbadarn Fawr: Saint-link Wales, Saint-link Avranches, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Abbey.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Hunna of Alsace, Confessor (died 679, also spelt Una; "the Holy Washerwoman"): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Abbo II of Metz, Bishop (died 707): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Twould also be the festival of Blessed César de Bus,Priest (1544-1607, also spelt Caesar), founder of the Fathers of Christian Doctrine & the Daughters of Christian Doctrine: Blessed-link ūnus, Blessed-link duo, & Wikipedia-link.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Where does Jesus send us? There are no borders; no limits. He sends us to everyone."
—Pope Francis (born 1936, incumbent since 2013)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"Let us lift ourselves above all things that pass, & hold ourselves far from the earth!"
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Just as the Savior, after His baptism & the coming of the Holy Spirit, went forth to vanquish the Enemy (in the wilderness), so you too, after Holy Baptism & Mystical Chrismation, having put on the whole armor of the Holy Spirit, are to resist the power of the Adversary & to vanquish him, saying, 'I can do all things in Christ Who strengthens me' (Philippians, 4:13)."
—St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Doctor of the Church (313-386, feast day: 18 March)

Bonus! Song o' the Lord's Day: III Sunday o' Easter

The Festival Choir & Hosanna Chorus, "Jesus Christ Is Risen Today" from 100 Church Classics (The Last Angry Man)

Commentary: By the grace of God, the joy of Easter is too great to be contained in a single day.

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril!


Suburban Legends, "Bright Spring Morning" from Rump Shaker (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary: On this bright spring morning in pure Michigan, a freezing rain has been falling for the last day, making the ground a treacherous sheet of ice. But "Bright Spring Morning" isn't about the weather, it's about running away from home, a typically juvenile way to avoid rather than deal with one's problems. Suburban Legends are fun, but more pop sensible than most other ska bands, leading to a paucity of significance in their catalog. But, as I wrote, fun!
"The sun is shining bright outside,
Think I'll go for a ride,
I plan not to ever return,
Let's us away from here for good,
For get this dusty neighborhood,
The open road is begging & calling for us!

"Go, roll down that window,
Go, crank up that radio,
Let's drive until we hit the sky!
It's not about where we go,
Let's start living life before we die,
Before we die…"

Saturday, April 14, 2018

Friday, April 13, 2018

Saints + Scripture: Eastertide — Better Late than Never

'Tis the Optional Memorial of Saint Martin I, Pope & Martyr (circa 595-655), seventy-fourth (LXXIV) Bishop of Rome, martyred in the reign of the Byzantine emperor Constans II for opposing the Monothelite heresy: Martyr-link ūnus, Martyr-link duo, Martyr-link trēs, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Pontiff; Heresy-link & Wikipedia-link Heresy.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
Elected pope in 649, Martin I had gotten in trouble for refusing to condone silence in the face of wrong.… From there he was exiled to the Crimea where he suffered from the famine of the land as well as the roughness of the land & its people. But hardest to take was the fact that the pope found himself friendless. His letters tell how his own church had deserted him & his friends had forgotten him.
'Tis also the festival of Saint Hermenegild, Martyr (died 585, also spelt Ermengild), martyred in the reign of his father, the Visigothic king Liuvigild, an Arian heretic: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Heresy-link & Wikipedia-link Heresy.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Caradoc, Priest & Hermit (died 1124): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Blesseds Edmund Catherick & John Lockwood, Priests & Martyrs (died 1642), martyred in the reign of the English king Charles I, two of the Martyrs of Douai: Martyr-link Echo Charlie & Wikipedia-link Echo Charlie, Martyr-link Juliett Lima & Wikipedia-link Juliett Lima; Martyrs-link Douai & Wikipedia-link Douai.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Friday of the Second Week of Easter
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter five, verses thirty-four thru forty-two;
Psalm Twenty-seven, verses one, four, & thirteen & fourteen;
The Gospel according to John, chapter six, verses one thru fifteen.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, our Gospel today focuses on St. John’s intense meditation on the meaning of the Eucharist. The tone is set with the familiar story of the feeding of the five thousand, the only miracle story mentioned in all four Gospels. This scene deeply affected the first Christians.

Jesus instructs the crowd to recline on the grass. Taking the barley loaves and dried fish, Jesus makes a meal that satisfies the enormous crowd. They are hungry, tired, and worn out from their exertions, and Jesus gives them sustenance for the day.

For Thomas Aquinas, the great metaphor for the Eucharist is sustenance, food for the journey. Baptism defines us, making us sons and daughters of God; confirmation confirms and deepens this identity; marriage and holy orders seal us in our life’s vocation. These are sacraments offered once at key moments in one’s life.

Then there is the Eucharist, which is daily food, nourishment to get us through the day-to-day. How effective would we be if we never ate, or ate only on special occasions and in a festive environment? Not very. So, in the spiritual life, we must eat and drink or we will not have the strength.
Video reflection by Yvonne Dilling: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Mass Readings—Optional Memorial of St. Martin I
The Second Letter to Timothy, chapter two, verses eight thru thirteen & chapter three, verses ten, eleven, & twelve;
Psalm One Hundred Twenty-six, verse five;
The Gospel according to John, chapter fifteen, verses eighteen thru twenty-one.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Those who deem themselves to be Christian must know this fact. They are bound my conscience to the basic, imperative duty of bearing witness to the truth in which they believe & to the grace that has transformed their soul."
—Pope St. John XXIII (1881-1963, feast day: 11 October)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"My sword is Love, & with it I must drive out the stranger from the land, & establish Your kingdom in souls."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Do not say that you have chaste minds if you have unchaste eyes, because an unchaste eye is the messenger of an unchaste heart."
—St. Augustine of Hippo, Doctor of the Church (354-430, feast day: 28 August)

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril!


MU330, "Hang Tuff Hold Tight" from Chumps on Parade (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary: "Hang Tuff Hold Tight"—which should be titled "Hang Tough, Hold Tight"—is a muse pick. I had already selected & set to publish another ska song as today's SKApril R.B.D.S.O.T.D., but when I woke up "Hang Tuff Hold Tight" was running through my head. MU330 had not yet participated in this year's SKApril; so, rok, rok, rok!

"Hang Tuff Hold Tight" is about the travails of playing in a traveling band, about the not-so-glamorous grind of touring. In college, at Red Hot Lovers, I had a boss who had been a touring jazz pianist. Having been on stage as a member of Murky Transport Disaster & real Can of Yams, I knew the thrill of performing live in concert. All well & good, he didn't disagree, but things were different when you had to go on night after night, year after year; some days, you just don't want to go on stage. He was right, & my young eyes were opened to the idea that not all that glitters is gold.
"If your mind can't add it up (add it up),
Then follow your heart,
If it still doesn't make any sense,
You might have more at stake than you know.

"Hang tough, hold tight,
The ride's not over yet,
Hang tough, hold tight,
The ride's not over yet…"

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Saints + Scripture: Saturday w/in the Octave of Easter

The Long Road Back, Part II of V

Saturday, 7 April was the Saturday within the Octave of Easter: Wikipedia-link.


Scripture of That Day
Mass Readings—Saturday within the Octave of Easter
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter four, verses thirteen thru twenty-one;
Psalm One Hundred Eighteen, verses one, fourteen, & fifteen(a/b); sixteen, seventeen, & eighteen; & nineteen, twenty, & twenty-one;
The Gospel according to Mark, chapter sixteen, verses nine thru fifteen.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s passage Jesus commissions his disciples to “go into the whole world and proclaim the Gospel to every creature.”

The Church doesn’t have a mission; the Church is a mission. A passionate Catholicism brings people to Christ, like the four people who lowered the paralytic through the roof to get him to Jesus. An evangelizing Catholicism shouts from the rooftops, grabs people by the lapels, and speaks with urgency and energy about Jesus.

Obviously, this has to be done with great respect and love; but very often, obstacles that come from our “get-along” culture, and perhaps from an exaggerated ecumenism, keep it from getting done at all. We have not been successful in our Christianity unless and until we have brought others to the Lord. “Where are the others?”
Video reflection by Deacon Bernard Nojadera: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.




Otherwise, 7 April would have been the festival of Blessed Notker the Stammerer, Priest, O.S.B. (circa 840-912; A.K.A. the Poet, of Saint Gall): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Twould also have been the festival of Saint Henry Walpole, Priest & Martyr, S.J. (1558-1595), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I, one of the Forty Martyrs of England & Wales: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link XL & Wikipedia-link XL.

'Twould also have been the festival of Blessed Alexander Rawlins, Priest & Martyr (died 1595), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Twould also have been the festival of Blesseds Edward Oldcorne, Priest, & Ralph Ashley, Martyrs, S.J. (died 1606), martyred in the reign of the Anglo-Scottish king James VI & I, in the aftermath of the Gunpowder Plot: Martyr-link Echo Oscar & Wikipedia-link Echo Oscar; Martyr-link Romeo Alpha & Wikipedia-link Romeo Alpha; Plot-link & Wikipedia-link Plot.

'Twould also have been the festival of Saint Jean-Baptiste de la Salle, Priest, F.S.C. (1651-1719), founder of the De La Salle Brothers, A.K.A. the Christian Brothers, formally the Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools: Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link F.S.C.

Papal Quote o' That Day
"He who is chaste in flesh should not be proud, for he should know that he owes the gift of continence to another."
—Pope St. Clement I (35-99, feast day: 23 November)
Little Flower Quote o' That Day
"How good God is to have given wings to my soul & lifted it up!"
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' That Day
"Charity is no substitute for justice withheld."
—St. Augustine of Hippo, Doctor of the Church (354-430, feast day: 28 August)

Saints + Scripture: Eastertide

'Tis the festival of Saint Julius I, Pope (died 352), thirty-fifth (XXXV) Bishop of Rome: Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Pontiff.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Zeno of Verona, Bishop (circa 300-371; also spelt Zenón or Zénon): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Sabbas the Goth, Martyr (334-372, A.K.A. the Lector), martyred by pagan Goths: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Teresa of Jesus of the Andes, Religious, O.C.D. (1900-1920, A.K.A. Juana Fernández Solar): Saint-link ūna, Saint-link duæ, & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Saint David Uribe Velasco, Priest & Martyr (1888-1927), martyred in the reign of the Mexican president Plutarco Elías Calles, one of the Martyrs of the Cristero War: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link (list); Martyrs-link Cristeros & Wikipedia-link Cristeros.

Scripture of This Day
Mass Readings—Easter Weekday
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter five, verses twenty-seven thru thirty-three;
Psalm Thirty-four, verses two & nine, seventeen & eighteen, & nineteen & twenty;
The Gospel according to John, chapter three, verses thirty-one thru thirty-six.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, today’s Gospel declares that the Son of God does not ration his gift of the Spirit. At the cathedral in Chartres, the figure of Jesus is surrounded by seven doves, symbolizing these seven gifts of the Holy Spirit: wisdom, understanding, counsel, fortitude, knowledge, piety, and fear of the Lord. The Messiah will be filled up with all of the powers and energies of God’s Spirit.

These seven gifts have played a prominent role in our tradition, appearing in theologians as diverse as Gregory the Great, Augustine, and Thomas Aquinas. These gifts are signs that the Christian is participating in Jesus Christ. In holding up this image, therefore, the Church is asking us to meditate on the people that we are called to be: participants in Jesus.

How does one come by these gifts? We can’t really earn them or work our way toward them. But they do come from Jesus Christ, and therefore from our proximity to him through the Church and the sacraments. As we wait in joyful hope for the coming of the Lord, pray for the conformity to him which consists in the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit.
Video reflection by Fr. Roger Lopez, O.F.M. (Franciscan Media): U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Papal Quote o' This Day
"The peace of Christ is different from that of the world. The peace of Christ surely does not remove trials & tribulations, but it is always a source of serenity & happiness. For it brings with it the fullness of life."
—Pope St. John Paul II (the Great; 1920-2005, feast day: 22 October)
Little Flower Quote o' This Day
"To limit your desires & your hopes is to misunderstand God's infinite goodness!"
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' This Day
"The purpose of clothing is to keep warm in winter & to cover your nakedness, not to serve your vanity."
—St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Doctor of the Church (313-386, feast day: 18 March)

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril!


Johnny Socko, "Hasselhoff" from Full Trucker Effect (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary:
"Cruise a beach, I make 'em screech,
Hope that they don't notice my crow's feet,
Suck in the gut, and pout and strut,
A locker without my poster is incomplete…

"I'm feelin' more like Dave Hasselhoff every day,
Treat me more like Dave Hasselhoff every day,
Every single day!
Dave, Dave Hasselhoff, Hasselhoff,
Dave, Dave Hasselhoff, Hasselhoff…"

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Saints + Scripture: Friday within the Octave of Easter

The Long Road Back, Part I of V

Friday, 6 April was the Friday within the Octave of Easter: Wikipedia-link.


Scripture of That Day
Mass Readings—Friday within the Octave of Easter
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter four, verses one thru twelve;
Psalm One Hundred Eighteen, verses one, two, & four; twenty-two, twenty-three, & twenty-four; & twenty-six, twenty-six, & twenty-seven(a);
The Gospel according to John, chapter twenty-one, verses one thru fourteen.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel, the risen Jesus appears to seven disciples on the shore of the Sea of Tiberias. Jesus rose bodily from the dead. This is the fact—eminently surprising and unexpected—that gives birth to Christianity. The excitement that you can sense on every page of the New Testament comes from this novelty.

Why did the risen Jesus appear only to a few? Why didn’t he make himself readily apparent to anyone who wanted to see? Cardinal Newman commented on this. If Jesus had appeared publicly and indiscriminately to all, the power of the Resurrection would have been lessened. Some would believe; others wouldn’t. Some would get it; others wouldn’t. Some would be fascinated; others indifferent.

Instead, he deigned to appear to a small coterie of dedicated disciples who knew him, loved him, understood him—confident that they would be the effective bearers of his message. We are those now who eat and drink with him after his Resurrection. And so we have a commission to announce this Good News.
Video reflection by Deacon Clinton Couch: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.




Otherwise, 6 April would have been the festival of Saint Sixtus I, Pope (circa 42-128, also spelt Xystus), seventh (VII) Bishop of Rome, martyred in the reign of the Roman emperor Hadrian: Martyr-link ūnus, Martyr-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Pontiff.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Twould also have been the festival of Blessed Zefirino Agostini, Priest (1813-1896), founder of the Pious Union of Sisters Devoted to Saint Angela Merici & the Congregation of Ursulines, Daughters of Mary Immaculate: Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Twould also have been the festival of Blessed Michał Czaroryski, Priest & Martyr, O.P. (1897-1944, A.K.A. Jan Franciszek Czaroryski), martyred in the reign of the Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler, one of the One Hundred Eight Blessed Polish Martyrs: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link CVIII & Wikipedia-link CVIII.

Papal Quote o' That Day
"Watch! Do not let the precious values of faithful married love & family life be taken away from you. Do not reject them, or think that there is some other human prospect for happiness & human fulfillment."
—Pope St. John Paul II (the Great, 1920-2005; feast day: 22 October)
Little Flower Quote o' That Day
"For every grace I made good use of, He gave me many more."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' That Day
"The dress of the body should not discredit the good of the soul."
—St. Cyprian of Carthage (200-258, feast day: 16 September)

Saints + Scripture: Eastertide — Better Late than Never

The Popish Plot
Wacky Wednesday: "Gossip Is Murder!"

'Tis the Memorial of Saint Stanislaus, Bishop & Martyr (1030-1079, of Szczepanów, of Kraków; also spelt Stanisław Szczepanowski), martyred personally by the Polish king Bolesław II "the Cruel:" Martyr-link ūnus, Martyr-link duo, & Wikipedia-link.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
He was Bishop of Cracow. he incurred the enmity of King Boleslaus the Bold when he denounced the king's cruelties & injustices & especially his kidnapping of the beautiful wife of a nobleman. When Stanislaus excommunicated tje king & stopped services at the cathedral when Boleslaus entered, Boleslaus himself killed Stanislaus while the bishop was saying Mass in a chapel outside the city on 11 April. Stanislaus has long been the symbol of Polish nationhood.
'Tis also the festival of Saint Guthlac of Crowland, Priest & Hermit, O.S.B. (circa 673-715), atop whose cell was later built Crowland Abbey: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Abbey.

Commentary: Brother of St. Pega of Peakirk [8 January].

'Tis also the festival of Blessed George Gervase, Priest & Martyr, O.S.B. (1571-1608, also spelt Jervise), martyred in the reign of the Anglo-Scottish king James VI & I, one of the Martyrs of Douai: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link Douai & Wikipedia-link Douai.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Gemma Galgani, Virgin, C.P. (1878-1903, the "Flower of Lucca" & the "Daughter of Passion"), stigmatist: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Stigmata-link & Wikipedia-link Stigmata.


Scripture of This Day
Mass Readings—Easter Weekday
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter five, verses seventeen thru twenty-six;
Psalm Thirty-four, verses two & three, four & five, six & seven, & eight & nine;
The Gospel according to John, chapter three, verses sixteen thru twenty-one.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, maybe you've seen informal evangelists at football or baseball games holding up a sign: “John 3:16.” Did you ever wonder what that means?

Well, we hear this verse from the Gospel of John in today’s reading: “God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him might not perish but might have eternal life.”

I think it's good that those people hold up that sign, because in many ways that is the whole Gospel, and even the whole Christian tradition, in miniature. Every cathedral, every church, every poem, every drama, the life of every saint—that's what they're all about.

Christianity does not announce, primarily, our virtue; it doesn't sing our praises; it doesn't exult in human civilization. What it primarily does is announce that message: that even in our sin—you might say, especially in our sin—God loved us. And so what did He do? He broke open His Own Heart and He sent His Own self into our humanity to heal us and offer us eternal life.
Video reflection by Jem Sullivan, Ph.D.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Mass Readings—Memorial of Saint Stanislaus, Bishop & Martyr
The Book of Revelation, chapter twelve, verses ten, eleven, & twelve(a);
Psalm Thirty-four, verse five;
The Gospel according to John, chapter seventeen, verses eleven(b) thru nineteen.

Papal Quote o' This Day
"I believe in God—not in a Catholic God; there is no Catholic God. There is God, & I believe in Jesus Christ, His Incarnation. Jesus is my teacher & my pastor, but God, the Father, Abba, is the light & the Creator. This is my being."
—Pope Francis (born 1936, incumbent since 2013)
Little Flower Quote o' This Day
"It is trust, & nothing but trust, that must bring us to Love… Fear brings us only to Justice."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' This Day
"God loves each of us as if there were only one of us."
—St. Augustine of Hippo, Doctor of the Church (354-430, feast day: 28 August)

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril!


The Aquabats!, "My Skateboard!" from The Fury of the Aquabats! (Captain Thumbs Up!)

Skammentary!:
"Wo, wo, it's Friday night, I wanted to go out,
I didn't want to go to no show,
Didn't want to cruise Main Street,
I didn't want to go to no disco, no no,
I just wanted you to come over,
Sit on my couch, and hold me tight,
But you went out with some dumb jock
And left me alone with my skateboard tonight…"

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril!

Reel Big Fish, "Brand New Song" from Why Do They Rock So Hard? (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary:
"I've got a brand-new girlfriend,
She is so lovely, lovely.
I've got a new ex-girlfriend,
She is so fat & ugly.

"Oh, not you again!
It gets worse every time.
And one plus two again,
Won't work, I can't divide it!

"Well, I let it go, I don't care,
I love you, you're not there,
A brand-new song just for you,
I'm not sorry about the things I do!

"I've got a brand-new song,
It is so happy, happy.
I've got a brand-new attitude,
It is so hateful, hateful.

"Oh, not you again!
It gets worse every time.
And one plus two again,
Won't work, I can't divide it!

"Well, I let it go, I don't care,
I love you, you're not there,
A brand-new song just for you,
I'm so sorry—but that's not true!…

"You keep telling me
That it's so easy to forget it,
You keep telling me,
But I know I'll always regret it.

"Well, I let it go, I don't care,
I love you, you're not there,
A brand-new song, done my best,
I'm so sorry, sorry, about this mess!"

Sunday, April 8, 2018

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril!


Tokyo Ska Paradise Orchestra, "Sunny Blues / 7 Inch" from (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary: "Sunny Blues / 7 Inch" is sung in Japanese & I, to no one's great surprise, do not speak Japanese. I don't claim to understand, much less approve of "Sunny Blues / 7 Inch's" lyrics content, but I do wholeheartedly endorse it's musical content. Syncopate that beat!

Friday, April 6, 2018

Poetry Smackdown

Twice this week, Wednesday evening & this Friday morning, remarks by kith brought to mind remembrance of "Stopping By Wood on a Snowy Evening."

"Stopping By Wood on a Snowy Evening"
by Robert Frost

Whose woods these are I think I know.
His house is in the village though;
He will not see me stopping here
To watch his woods fill up with snow.

My little horse must think it queer
To stop without a farmhouse near
Between the woods and frozen lake
The darkest evening of the year.

He gives his harness bells a shake
To ask if there is some mistake.
The only other sound's the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark and deep.
But I have promises to keep,
And miles to go before I sleep,
And miles to go before I sleep.

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril!


The Mighty Mighty Bosstones, "Sister Mary" from Pin Points and Gin Joints (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary: Above, actual religious sisters! Sister Helena Burns, F.S.P. (left)—whose blog is titled Hell Burns, a play on her name & the theological reality—pictured astride a motorcycle with an unidentified fellow Daughter of Saint Paul.
"Can you remember the school in the slums?
Can you hear the trombone, the guitar, & the drums?
Sure you remember, & you know which one,
You went to the one, my son, that's run by the nun.

"Hey, Sister Mary, can you teach me the song?
While they drag him out of there in scandal & shame.
And Mister Cosmic the Slide, will you play along?
The man on the street, he couldn't handle the fame…"

Thursday, April 5, 2018

Saints + Scripture: Thursday w/in the Octave of Easter

'Tis the Thursday within the Octave of Easter: Wikipedia-link.


Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Thursday within the Octave of Easter
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter three, verses eleven thru twenty-six;
Psalm Eight, verses two(a/b) & five, six & seven, & eight & nine;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter twenty-four, verses thirty-five thru forty-eight.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel, the risen Jesus appears to his eleven disciples. They were understandably terrified and thought they were seeing a ghost. But Jesus is quick to disabuse them of this notion: "Look at my hands and my feet, that it is I myself. Touch me and see, because a ghost does not have flesh and bones as you can see I have."

While they were still amazed and incredulous for joy, he stunned them further, saying, "Have you anything here to eat?" With that, they gave him a piece of baked fish, which he ate in their presence.

The bodily resurrection of Jesus—as the first fruits of those who have fallen asleep—is the great sign that heaven and earth are coming together. A body that can be touched and that can consume baked fish has found its way into the realm of heaven.

What does this mean? It means that bodies are not finally alien to God. We have indeed an Advocate in the heavenly places. Were the Resurrection a convenient story or a clever myth, the two realms of heaven and earth would be as separate as ever.
Video reflection by Fr. Roger Lopez, O.F.M. (Franciscan Media): U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.




Otherwise, 5 April would be the festival of Saint Derfel, Abbot (circa 566-660, A.K.A. Derfel Gadarn, meaning "the Mighty"): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Vincent Ferrer, Priest, O.P. (1350-1419, the "Angel of the Last Judgment"), who labored to heal the Western Schism: Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Schism-link & Wikipedia-link Schism.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Maria Crescentia Höß, Virgin, T.O.R. (1682-1744; also spelt Höss, Hoess): Saint-link ūna, Saint-link duæ, & Wikipedia-link.

'Twould also be the festival of Blessed Mariano de la Mata Aparício, Priest, O.S.A. (1905-1983): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"The Gospel of Easter is very clear: we need to go back there, to see Jesus risen, & to become witnesses of His Resurrection. This is not the time to go back in time; it is not a kind of nostalgia. It is returning to our first love, in order to receive the fire which Jesus has kindled in the world & to bring that fire to all people, to the very ends of the earth."
—Pope Francis (born 1936; incumbent, since 2013)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"For the sake of Jesus we took His Cross, & for His sake let us persevere in it."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"It is not the actual physical exertion that counts toward a man's progress, nor the nature of the task, but the spirit of faith with which is is undertaken."
—St. Francis Xavier (1506-1552, feast day: 3 December)

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril!


Mustard Plug, "On and On" from In Black and White (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary: The image above is accurate, posers are not tolerated, but let me emphasize that this in no way excludes neophytes & novices, who are more than welcome. I remember very clearly the night during the Summer of Ska when I discovered ska, before which I was an ignoramus with no knowledge. Everyone is welcome to be enlightened by a syncopated revelation.

Also, though such is not explicitly stated in "On and On," based on previous experience I'm going to take a wild guess that this is a ska song about love gone wrong.
"By now, you think it's over,
Countdown, it's getting colder,
Come on, tell me it's over,
Goes on and on and on and on again.

"Tell me everything this time,
I'll tell you everything is fine,
Give me something I already know.
Heard you had too much inside
And you won't let me ask you why,
Come on, let me tell you all we know.

"By now, you think it's over,
Countdown, it's getting colder,
Come on, tell me it's over,
Goes on and on and on and on again.

"Someone tell me that I'm right,
Tell me it's too late tonight,
Tell me that I have a ways to go.
I can see it in your eyes,
I don't want the next suprise,
Come on, let me tell you all we know…

"By now, you think it's over,
It goes on and on again!
Countdown, it's getting colder,
It goes on and on again!
Come on, tell me it's over,
It goes on and on again!
Countdown!
Countdown!
Come on, it goes on and on again!"

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Saints + Scripture: Wednesday w/in Octave of Easter

'Tis the Wednesday within the Octave of Easter: Wikipedia-link.


Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Wednesday within the Octave of Easter
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter three, verses one thru ten;
Psalm One Hundred Five, verses one & two, three & four, six & seven, & eight & nine;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter twenty-four, verses thirteen thru thirty-five.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel, Jesus enlightens the disciples on the road to Emmaus. Have you ever tried to solve a puzzle and then were surprised when the various pieces suddenly fell into place? Well, this is what happens to these disciples as Jesus begins to speak: "How slow you are to believe all that the prophets have announced! Did not the Messiah have to undergo all this so as to enter into his glory?" The whole of Christianity is hanging here in the balance.

The disciples didn’t get it at first. They didn’t get the secret, the mystery, the key, the pattern. And what was that? God’s self-emptying love, even unto death. God’s act of taking upon himself the sins of the world in order to take them away, the mystery of redemption through suffering.

Jesus explains this first, with reference to the prophets; but then, he makes it as vividly present to them as he can: "He took the bread, pronounced the blessing, then broke the bread and began to distribute it to them." And that’s when the piece fell into place—that’s when the puzzle was solved. The Eucharist made present this love unto death, this love that is more powerful than sin and death. The Eucharist is the key.
Video reflection by Jem Sullivan, Ph.D.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.




Otherwise, 4 April would be the festival of Saint Zosimus of Palestine, Religious (circa 460-560): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Wayback Machine. 'Tis through St. Zosimus that we know of St. Mary of Egypt [1 April].

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Isidore of Seville, Bishop & Doctor of the Church (circa 560-636), who convened the Fourth Council of Toledo, labeled by some the last of the Church Fathers: Doctor-link ūnus, Doctor-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Council; Wikipedia-link Fathers & Wikipedia-link Doctors.

Commentary: Brother of Ss. Leander of Seville [13 March], Fulgentius of Cartagena [14 January], & Florentina of Cartagena [20 June].

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Benedict the Moor, Religious, O.F.M. (1526-1589; A.K.A. the Black, the African): Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Gaetano Catanoso, Priest (1879-1963, Anglicized as Cajetan Catanoso): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Faith in the Resurrection of Jesus says that there is a future for every human being; the cry for unending life which is a part of the person is indeed answered."
—Pope emeritus Benedict XVI (born 1927, reigned 2005-2013)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"How quickly life passes!… Soon we shall all be reunited in heaven. I love these words of the psalms very much: 'A thousand years in the eyes of the Lord are like yesterday that has already passed.'"
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"The Cross had asked the questions; the Resurrection had answered them… The Cross had asked: 'Why does God permit evil & sin to nail Jesus to a tree?'The Resurrection answered: 'That sin, having done its worst, might exhaust itself & thus be overcome by Love that is stronger than either sin or death.'"
—Venerable Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril!


Save Ferris, "New Sound" from the Checkered Past E.P. (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary: This is not the old Save Ferris, but a new band founded by old Save Ferris singer & frontwoman Monique Powell. The lads from Save Ferris called their new band Starpool, so I look askance at the lass continuing to use the name Save Ferris; the court's have signed off on it, so, it's licit, even if it isn't right.

All that said, SKApril isn't a charity: neither Starpool nor the new Save Ferris would be included in this month-long fête of all things ska if their music wasn't up to snuff. Our SKAffirmative Action program promotes diversity of contributors, not diversity of quality. Only the best of the best is good enough for SKApril. "New Sound" represents a genuinely new sound from Save Ferris, with much more of a reggæ flavor.
"Rude girl movin' on the dance floor,
Ain't got no problems, well, no more,
Skankin' her troubles away,
Nothin' nobody can say.

"Rudy lookin' smooth in the dance hall,
He jump in like troubles are all gone,
Rudy done move & he sway,
Nothin' nobody can say…"

Tuesday, April 3, 2018

Saints + Scripture: Tuesday w/in the Octave of Easter

The Popish Plot
Vlog Post: "Prayer Time Out: Regina Cœli"

'Tis the Tuesday within the Octave of Easter: Wikipedia-link.


Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Tuesday within the Octave of Easter
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter two, verses thirty-six thru forty-one;
Psalm Thirty-three, verses four & five, eighteen & nineteen, & twenty & twenty-two;
The Gospel according to John, chapter twenty, verses eleven thru eighteen.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, today’s Gospel reveals St. John’s report of Mary Magdalene’s encounter with the risen Jesus. An interesting lesson follows from the disquieting fact of the Resurrection, namely that this world is not it. What I mean is that this world is not all that there is. We live our lives with the reasonable assumption that the natural world as we’ve come to know it is the final framework of our lives and activities. And one of the most powerful and frightening features of the natural world is death. Every living thing dies and stays dead.

But what if death and dissolution did not have the final say? What if, through God’s power, and according to his providence, a "new heavens and a new earth" were being born? The Resurrection of Jesus from the dead shows as definitively as possible that God is up to something greater than we had imagined or thought possible.

And therefore we don’t have to live as though death were our master. In light of the Resurrection, we can begin to see this world as a place of gestation, a place of growth and maturation toward something higher, more permanent, and more splendid.
Video reflection by Sister Peggy Gorman, R.S.M.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.




Otherwise, 3 April would be the festival of Saint Burgundofara, Abbess (circa 595-657, A.K.A. Fara), foundress of the Abbey of Faremoutiers: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Abbey.

Commentary: Sister of the bishop St. Faro of Meaux [28 October].

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Richard of Chichester, Bishop (circa 1197-1253, A.K.A. Richard de Wych): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Twould also be the festival of Blesseds Thurstan Hunt & Robert Middleton, S.J., Priests & Martyrs (died 1601), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I, two of the Eighty-five Martyrs of England & Wales: Martyr-link Tango Hotel & Wikipedia-link Tango Hotel, Martyr-link Romeo Mike; Martyrs-link LXXXV & Wikipedia-link LXXXV.

Commentary: Bl. Robert was the nephew of the martyr St. Margaret Clitherow [25 March].

'Twould also be the festival of Blessed Piotr Edward Dankowski, Priest & Martyr (1908-1942), martyred in the reign of the Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler, one of the One Hundred Eight Blessed Polish Martyrs: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link (list: Priests, № 62); Martyrs-link CVIII & Wikipedia-link CVIII.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"How can we not sing? How can we not express the fullness of those feelings accumulated during our long Lenten journey & during the dramatic ritual of the Paschal Triduum?"
—Pope Bl. Paul VI (1897-1978, feast day: 26 September)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"What would become of me if God did not give me courage?"
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"As people, we are meant to have human joys: the joy of living, the joy of love & friendship, the joy of work well done. As Christians, we have cause for further joy: like Jesus, we know that we are loved by God our Father."
—Pope St. John Paul II (the Great, 1920-2005; feast day: 22 October)