Tuesday, April 30, 2019

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril


Bombskare, "Do All Dogs Go to Heaven?" from The Day the Earth Stood Stupid (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammntary: Bombskare are a Scottish (or "Skattish") band, as ska's horizons continue to expand beyond Jamaica, England, & SoCal.
"I had a teacher thought she was a preacher,
Now she's gone away, so very far away,
I was always drunk and I was always up the front,
And now she's gone away, so very far away…"

Saints + Scripture: Paschaltide — Please Stand By

Monday, April 29, 2019

The Explorers' Club, № DCLXXXV

Operation AXIOM: After the World War—The Red Scare, Part IV
April 1919: Anarchist mail-bombing campaign—At least thirty-six mail bombs were sent by Galleanist terrorists to politicians & businessmen throughout the United States, including Attorney General Palmer, Mayor Hanson of Seattle (who had defeated the February general strike), Senator Overman, & magnate John D. Rockefeller; none of the targets were hurt, but several innocents were maimed.




Lest we forget.

Saints + Scripture: Paschaltide — Please Stand By

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril


Starpool, "New Light" (live) from the Strpl E.P.0001 E.P. (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary:
"…There's only one thing that is clear to me:
I'm not exactly what I used to be.

"Everything is different in the new light,
(Yeah, yeah, yeah)
They say that everything would be alright,
So here I am
With all I have,
It's in my voice,
So hear me now
As I sing my choice…

"I didn't know just what it meant to me, yeah,
But truth came rushing up so suddenly…

"I don't want to be the only one
To see things differently,
Open up your eyes,
You'll see with me,
I can't change your mind,
But my voice is all I have,
So hear me…"

Sunday, April 28, 2019

Saints + Scripture: II Sunday of Easter — Stand By

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril


Goldfinger, "Get What I Need" from The Knife (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary:
"Someday you'll find everything will be alright,
I lost myself just to get what I want again,
Lost myself just to get what I want again!
Someday you'll see everything I left behind,
I lost myself just to get what I want again,
Lost myself just to get, to get what I need…"

Saturday, April 27, 2019

Saints + Scripture: Octave of Easter (Pascha) — P.S.B.

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril


Desmond Dekker & the Aces, "Pretty Africa" from King of Ska (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary:
"Me say, Why?
Take me back to Africa,
Pretty, pretty Africa,
It is the land of our forefathers,
It is the land where we belong.

"Telling you again what I say.
Me say, Why?
Take me back to Africa,
Pretty, pretty Africa,
It is the land of our forefathers,
It is the land where we belong…"

Friday, April 26, 2019

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril


Skameleon, "Wonderwall" from Ska Makes Everything Better (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary: Ska covers of '80s songs is a well known trope of Third Wave ska-punk. Save Ferris's biggest hit was their cover of "Come On, Eileen" & the Reel Big Fish performed their cover of "Take on Me" on the soundtrack of the film BASEkatball. Skameleon, from Germany, take it one step farther: they are a ska cover band. (Think a ska version of Me First and the Gimme Gimmes, who perform punk-ified covers of non-punk songs.) Best of all, Skameleon are still at it today, this year, 2019, celebrating 10 Jahre, ten years of ska making everything better.

"Wonderwall" is a ska-ified cover of the Oasis ballad, because it's true—ska makes everything better.

Saints + Scripture: Octave of Easter (Pascha)


'Tis the Friday within the Octave of Easter: Easter-link, Octave-link, Wikipedia-link Easter Week, & Wikipedia-link Octave.


Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Friday within the Octave of Easter
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter four, verses one thru twelve;
Psalm One Hundred Eighteen, verses one, two, & four; twenty-two, twenty-three, & twenty-four; & twenty-five, twenty-six, & twenty-seven(a);
The Gospel according to John, chapter twenty-one, verses one thru fourteen.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel the risen Jesus appears to seven disciples on the shore of the Sea of Tiberias. Jesus rose bodily from the dead. This is the fact—eminently surprising and unexpected—that gives birth to Christianity. The excitement that you can sense on every page of the New Testament comes from this novelty.

Why did the risen Jesus appear only to a few? Why didn’t he make himself readily apparent to anyone who wanted to see? Cardinal Newman commented on this. If Jesus had appeared publicly and indiscriminately to all, the power of the Resurrection would have been lessened. Some would believe; others wouldn’t. Some would get it; others wouldn’t. Some would be fascinated; others indifferent.

Instead, he deigned to appear to a small coterie of dedicated disciples who knew him, loved him, understood him—confident that they would be the effective bearers of his message. We are those now who eat and drink with him after his Resurrection. And so we have a commission to announce this Good News.
Video reflection by the Very Reverend Kevin P. Fausz, C.M., V.U.: U. S. C. of Catholic Bishops.


Scripture Study—Wisdom Books
The Book of the Psalms, psalm eighty-eight (verses one thru eighteen);
The Book of the Psalms, psalm one hundred seventeen (verses one & two);
The Book of the Psalms, psalm one hundred eighteen (verses one thru twenty-nine);
The Book of the Proverbs, chapter twenty-six (verses one thru twenty-eight).

Commentary: Prayer for Help in Despondency (Psalm 88), Universal Call to Worship (Psalm 117), A Song of Victory (Psalm 118), & Further Wise Sayings of Solomon (cont'd; Proverbs, 26:1-28).



Otherwise, 26 April would be the festival of Our Lady of Good Counsel: Madonna-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Cletus, Pope & Martyr (circa 25-89, A.K.A. Anacletus), third (III) Bishop of Rome, martyred in the reign of the Roman emperor Domitian, mentioned in the Roman Canon (A.K.A. Eucharistic Prayer I): Martyr-link ūnus, Martyr-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Pontiff-link & Wikipedia-link Pontiff; & Canon-link & Wikipedia-link Canon.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Marcellinus, Pope & Martyr (died circa 304), twenty-ninth (XXIX) Bishop of Rome, martyred in the reign of the Roman emperors Diocletian & Maximian, a victim of the Great Persecution: Martyr-link ūnus, Martyr-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Pontiffs-link, & Wikipedia-link Pontiff; & Wikipedia-link Persecution.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Paschasius Radbertus, Abbot, O.S.B. (circa 785-865), abbot of Corbie Abbey: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Abbey-link Corbie & Wikipedia-link Corbie.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Stephen of Perm, Bishop (1340-1396, the "Apostle of the Permians"): Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link.

'Twould also be the festival of Blessed Stanislaw Kubista, Priest & Martyr, S.V.D. (1898-1940), martyred in the reign of the Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler, one of the One Hundred Eight Blessed Polish Martyrs: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link Polska & Wikipedia-link Polska.

Proverb o' the Day (Proverbs, 26:21)
As charcoal to hot embers & wood to fire,
so is a quarrelsome man for kindling strife.
Papal Quote o' the Day
"Every believer ought to be an active member of the Church. Every Catholic lay person is invested with the right & has the duty to work in order to testify to & spread the Kingdom of God."
—Pope St. Paul VI (1897-1978, feast day: 26 September)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"You are wrong to find fault with this thing & with that, or to try & make everyone see things as you see them. We desire to be as little children & little children do not know what is best: to them all seems right."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Commentary: I disagree utterly with this quote, but include it here because St. Thérèse is a Doctor of the Church & I am not; so, though I am confident she is wrong, I hope & pray the Lord will show me the sense in what seems to me nonsense & will show me just how wrong I am.

Saint Quote o' the Day
"If there was one dominant characteristic about St. Peter, it was that he hated discipline, mortification, & self-denial. He's just like the rest of us. He wanted to lay hold of the immediate & that which is joyful, but he did not want to have anything really crucial in his life. That is evidenced first of all on the Mount of the Transfiguration. Here our Blessed Lord revealed Himself in His risen glory when His face shone as the sun & His garments were as white as snow. While He was in this state, Moses and Elijah appeared. And what did our Lord talk to them about? His death. Peter all the while was asleep in a trance, & when he became conscious of the transfiguration, his first thought was: 'Lord it's wonderful to be here.' Let's capture this glow. This is the kingdom of God. The gospel says, 'He did not know what he was saying.' So our Lord later took him down the mountain where there was the father with the demonic child. Peter was to go to still another mountain, & only after climbing that mountain—Calvary—would he ever understand the glory that came after another, & very different, kind of transfiguration at Calvary. So Peter did not understand suffering."
—Venerable Fulton Sheen (1895-1979

Thursday, April 25, 2019

The Explorers' Club, № DCLXXXIV

Operation AXIOM: After the World War—The Paris Peace Conference, Part IV
26 April 1919: The Italians walked out of the Peace Conference—The "Big Four" were at loggerheads over Britain & France's extravagant territorial promises to Italy in the 1915 Treaty of London (the only reason Italy had joined the Entente in the first place, & shed so many Italian soldiers' blood) & the United States' novel, vague, & inconsistently applied principle of national self-determination.




Lest we forget.

Commentary: The secret London Pact, signed on 26 April 1915, four years to the day before Italy walked out of the Parish Peace Conference: Wayback Machine "The Explorers' Club," № CDLVIII.

Saints + Scripture: Octave of Easter (Pascha)


'Tis the Thursday within the Octave of Easter: Easter-link, Octave-link, Wikipedia-link Easter Week, & Wikipedia-link Octave.


Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Thursday within the Octave of Easter
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter three, verses eleven thru twenty-six;
Psalm Eight, verses two(a/b) & five, six & seven, & eight & nine;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter twenty-four, verses thirty-five thru forty-eight.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel the risen Jesus appears to his eleven disciples. They were understandably terrified and thought they were seeing a ghost. But Jesus is quick to disabuse them of this notion: "Look at my hands and my feet, that it is I myself. Touch me and see, because a ghost does not have flesh and bones as you can see I have."

While they were still amazed and incredulous for joy, he stunned them further, saying, "Have you anything here to eat?" With that, they gave him a piece of baked fish, which he ate in their presence.

The bodily resurrection of Jesus—as the first fruits of those who have fallen asleep—is the great sign that heaven and earth are coming together. A body that can be touched and that can consume baked fish has found its way into the realm of heaven.

What does this mean? It means that bodies are not finally alien to God. We have indeed an Advocate in the heavenly places. Were the Resurrection a convenient story or a clever myth, the two realms of heaven and earth would be as separate as ever.
Video reflection by Monsignor James Vlaun: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.




Otherwise, 25 April would be the festival of Saint Mark, Evangelist (died circa 68, A.K.A. John Mark), inspired author of the Gospel according to Mark: Evangelist-link ūnus, Evangelist-link duo, Wikipedia-link Evangelist, & Wikipedia-link John Mark; Gospel-link & Wikipedia-link Gospel.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Twould also be the festival of Blesseds Robert Anderton & William Marsden, Priests & Martyrs (both circa 1560-1586), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I, two of the one hundred fifty-eight Martyrs of Douai: Martyr-link Romeo Alpha, Martyr-link Whiskey Mike, & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link Douai & Wikipedia-link Douai.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Pedro de San José Betancur, Religious, O.F.B. (1626-1667, the "Saint Francis of the Americas;" also spelt Betancourt), founder of the Order of Bethlehemite Brothers (O.F.B.): Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link O.F.B.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Giovanni Battista Piamarta, Priest (1841-1913), founder of the Paimartinis, formally the Congregation of the Holy Family of Nazareth (F.N.) & the Congregation of the Sisters, Humble Servants of the Lord: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link F.N.

'Twould also be the festival of Blesseds Mario Borzaga, Priest (O.M.I.), & Paul Thoj Xyooj, Martyrs (died 1960), martyred by the Communist Pathet Lao, two of the seventeen Martyrs of Laos: Martyr-link Mike Bravo, Martyr-link Papa Tango X-ray, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Laos.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"The dynamism of new life is at work throughout history in apostolic service & in the mandate to pass on the Gospel. In order to touch everyone's heart it must be translated into understandable & easily accessible language."
—Pope St. John Paul Ii the Great (1920-2005, feast day: 22 October)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"Do all in your power to detach your heart from earthly cares… then be assured Our Lord will do the rest."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Look into your own heart. I've looked into mine. I've had a great deal of suffering in the eighty-three years of my life—physical suffering & other suffering. It should never have happened, & it has lasted for many years. Yet, as I look back, I know very well that I have never received the punishment that I deserved. God has been easy with me. He has not laid on me burdens that were equal to my failures. If we look into our own souls, I think that we will also come to the same conclusion, for God speaks to us in various ways. As C. S. Lewis put it, 'God whispers to us in our pleasures, he speaks to us in our conscience, and he shouts to us in our pain.' Pain is God's megaphone. And unlike the ripples that are made in a brook or that you see when you throw a stone in a pond, the ripples of pain, instead of going out to distant shores, narrow & narrow & come to a central point where there is less of the outside of the circle & more of the center. Not the ego, but the real person & the real self. And one begins to find oneself alone with God. That is what happens in pain."
—Venerable Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril


Reel Big Fish, "Bob Marley's Toe" from Life Sucks… Let's Dance! (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary: was released last year, in 2018. It warms this old ska kid's heart to know there is still new ska being released, that ska truly is not dead as we await the belated coming of the "fourth wave."
"When reggae music is live and direct,
Peace and love is in full effect,
So treat your fellow human with respect,
And every little thing's gonna be alright…"

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Saints + Scripture: Octave of Easter (Pascha)


'Tis the Wednesday within the Octave of Easter: Easter-link, Octave-link, Wikipedia-link Easter Week, & Wikipedia-link Octave.


Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Wednesday within the Octave of Easter
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter three, verses one thru ten;
Psalm One Hundred Five, verses one & two, three & four, six & seven, & eight & nine;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter twenty-four, verses thirteen thru thirty-five.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel Jesus enlightens the disciples on the road to Emmaus. Have you ever tried to solve a puzzle and then were surprised when the various pieces suddenly fell into place? Well, this is what happens to these disciples as Jesus begins to speak: "How slow you are to believe all that the prophets have announced! Did not the Messiah have to undergo all this so as to enter into his glory?" The whole of Christianity is hanging here in the balance.

The disciples didn’t get it at first. They didn’t get the secret, the mystery, the key, the pattern. And what was that? God’s self-emptying love, even unto death. God’s act of taking upon himself the sins of the world in order to take them away, the mystery of redemption through suffering.

Jesus explains this first, with reference to the prophets; but then, he makes it as vividly present to them as he can: "He took the bread, pronounced the blessing, then broke the bread and began to distribute it to them." And that’s when the piece fell into place—that’s when the puzzle was solved. The Eucharist made present this love unto death, this love that is more powerful than sin and death. The Eucharist is the key.
Video reflection by Jem Sullivan, Ph.D.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.




Otherwise, 24 April would be the festival of Saint Mary Salome (floruit 33): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Wayback Machine. Kinswoman of the Virgin Mary [many, many feast days] & mother of the Apostles Ss. James the Greater [25 July] & John [27 December], the sons of Zebedee.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Mary of Cleophas (floruit 33, A.K.A. of Clopas): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Kinswoman of the Virgin Mary [many, many feast days] & mother of the Apostle St. James the Less [3 May].

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Diarmid of Armagh, Bishop (died circa 852; also spelt Dermot; in the Irish, Diarmait ua Tigernáin), Bishop of Armagh: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Armagh.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint William Firmatus, Priest & Hermit (1026-1103, of Tours): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Fidelis of Sigmaringen, Priest & Martyr, O.F.M. Cap. (1577-1622; A.K.A. Mark Rey), martyred by Swiss proponents of the Calvinist heresy: Martyr-link ūnus, Martyr-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Heresy-link & Wikipedia-link Heresy.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Let no one in your land be at ease while there is anyone whose human & Christian dignity is not respected & loved. This is true whether that person is a man, a woman, a child, an elderly or sick person, or any child of God!"
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, feast day: 22 October)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"You came into this land of exile, willing to suffer & to die, in order to carry away every single soul & plunge it into the very heart of the Trinity—love's eternal home."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"What answer can we give or what consolation to someone in a concentration camp, to a mother with several children dying of cancer, a bereavement-what solace do we bring? What is the answer to the problem of evil? There was no answer until the Lord came down from heaven. He broke through this world of sin & evil; He entered into it & made it a part of Himself. He identified Himself with evil. Sinless, He was nevertheless made sin.

A Nazi guard during the Nuremburg Trial said that he was sent in to burn hundreds of Jewish bodies, all naked & dead. When he went to set the fire, he saw in their midst one body clothed, that of a young girl of about eighteen. 'Who are you?'

'I am a Jewess from Salonika.'

'What are you doing here?'

She said, 'Did you think that I could live when my people are dying?' So this is the only answer that there is to the problem of evil. There's no other. Our Lord took it upon Himself."
—Venerable Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)

Operation ÖSTERREICH: Exodus 90, Day 94

Weekly Wednesday Weigh-in
Last weigh-in: 308.4 lbs
This weigh-in: ?
Difference: +/-? lbs.

'Tis the Wednesday within the Octave of Easter, one of eight consecutive days of mandatory feasting. (No fasting allowed!) As long as my recorded weight is stuck at three hundred eight pounds (308 lbs.), I thought I might as well take advantage of the connection, however tenuous, to the Ferrari 308 G.T.S.


Bonus! Lied von ÖSTERREICH
Mike Post & Pete Carpenter, "Theme from Magnum, P.I." from 100 Greatest T.V. Themes (The Last Angry Magnum)

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril!


The Aquabats!, "Idiot Box!" from The Fury of the Aquabats! (Captain Thumbs Up!)

Skammentary: GOGO13's original recording of "Idiot Box" was part of the first SKApril way back in '11, but The Aquabats!' cover, "Idiot Box!," is sufficiently differentiated to merit inclusion in SKApril '19. Plus, Exodus 90 has crystallized my already strengthening conviction that television is by & large a waste of time, a most pernicious thief of our most precious & utterly irreplaceable resource.
"Turn off the idiot box! Hey!
It's a disease just like the chicken pox! Now
Turn off the idiot box! Now!

"Find yourself a partner,
Turn off the television,
Don't let it control your mind!

"Friends, Romans, countrymen, I've got something to say,
(Nobody knows, nobody knows)
Get off your butt, get up, go out and play,
(Nobody knows, nobody knows)
Sitting in my living room with nothing left to do,
I think I'm going blind watching
Mr. Magoo,
I know every single ending of every
Scooby-Doo. Now!

"Turn off the idiot box! Hey!
It's a disease just like the chicken pox! Now
Turn off the idiot box! Now!…"
Except of course for The Aquabats! Super Show! The Aquabats! Super Show! is pure gold.

Tuesday, April 23, 2019

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril


Tokyo Ska Paradise Orchestra, "Glorious" from Glorious (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Saints + Scripture: Octave of Easter (Pascha)


'Tis the Tuesday within the Octave of Easter: Easter-link, Octave-link, & Wikipedia-link Octave.


Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Tuesday within the Octave of Easter
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter two, verses thirty-six thru forty-one;
Psalm Thirty-three, verses four & five, eighteen & nineteen, & twenty & twenty-two;
The Gospel according to John, chapter twenty, verses eleven thru eighteen.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, today’s Gospel reveals St. John’s report of Mary Magdalene’s encounter with the risen Jesus. An interesting lesson follows from the disquieting fact of the Resurrection, namely that this world is not it. What I mean is that this world is not all that there is. We live our lives with the reasonable assumption that the natural world as we’ve come to know it is the final framework of our lives and activities. And one of the most powerful and frightening features of the natural world is death. Every living thing dies and stays dead.

But what if death and dissolution did not have the final say? What if, through God’s power, and according to his providence, a "new heavens and a new earth" were being born? The Resurrection of Jesus from the dead shows as definitively as possible that God is up to something greater than we had imagined or thought possible.

And therefore we don’t have to live as though death were our master. In light of the Resurrection, we can begin to see this world as a place of gestation, a place of growth and maturation toward something higher, more permanent, and more splendid.
Video reflection by Father Greg Friedman, O.F.M.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Video reflection by Scott Hahn, Ph.D.: Saint Paul Center for Biblical Theology.




Otherwise, 23 April would be the festival of Saint George, Martyr (circa 280-303), martyred in the reign of the Roman emperors Diocletian & Maximian, a victim of the Great Persecution; one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers: Martyr-link ūnus, Martyr-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Saint George's Day; Wikipedia-link Persecution; & Helpers-link & Wikipedia-link Helpers.

Commentary: Wayback Machine. A Golden Legend: Wikipedia-link Saint George & the Dragon

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Gerard of Toul, Bishop (circa 935-994): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Diocese-link Toul & Wikipedia-link Toul.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Adalbert, Bishop & Martyr, O.S.B. (circa 956-997, of Prague; A.K.A. Vojtěch), second (II) Bishop of Prague, martyred by pagan priests of the Old Prussians: Martyr-link ūnus, Martyr-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Diocese-link Prague & Wikipedia-link Prague.

'Twould also be the festival of Blessed Adalbert III of Salzburg, Bishop, O.Praem. (1145-1200, A.K.A. Vojtěch, of Bohemia), Archbishop of Salzburg: Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link; Diocese-link Salzburg & Wikipedia-link Salzburg.

'Twould also be the festival of Blessed Giles of Assisi, Religious, O.F.M. (circa 1190-1262, the "Knight of [the early Franciscans'] Round Table;" also spelt Aegidius): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Twould also be the festival of Blessed Teresa Maria of the Cross, Religious, O.C.D. (1846-1910, A.K.A. Teresa Adelaide Cesina Manetti), foundress of the Carmelite Sisters of Saint Teresa of Florence: Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"All the pure in heart are, in a certain sense, mystics, because, as Christ proclaimed, they are condidates to 'see God.' But they should all be pure in heart, all good, simple, & childlike. We should all be able to want, be able to yearn, be able to receive."
—Pope St. Paul VI (1897-1978, feast day: 26 September)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"I would like to love Jesus so much… to love Him more than He has ever been loved! My only desire is to always do the will of Jesus!"
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Someone gave me a canary to be my companion during a long sickness. If I told that bird, 'You are in this tiny, little cage and you have wings, but this is the right place for you,' I'm sure the bird would be depressed. If, however, the bird could understand, & I said to him, 'You're in the wrong place. You have a gift of song that should mount to the heavens, and you have wings that should fly' the bird would then be happier. So we are unhappy when we are locked in this little cosmos, which could be shattered by a bomb. But if we are told that there is another world, then life becomes a little bit happier."
—Venerable Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)

Monday, April 22, 2019

The Explorers' Club, № DCLXXXIII

Operation AXIOM: After the World War
15 April 1919: The Save the Children Fund was founded—British sisters Miss Eglantyne Jebb & Mrs. Dorothy Buxton separated their efforts from the lobbying-focused Fight the Famine Council to "provide relief to children suffering the effects of war," specifically malnutrition, even starvation in defeated Germany & Austria, devising innovative fund-raising techniques like individual sponsorships.





Lest we forget.

Saints + Scripture: Octave of Easter (Pascha)


'Tis the Monday within the Octave of Easter: Easter-link, Octave-link, & Wikipedia-link Octave.


Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Monday within the Octave of Easter
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter two, verses fourteen & twenty-two thru thirty-three;
Psalm Sixteen, verses one, two(a), & five; seven & eight; nine & ten; & eleven;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter twenty-eight, verses eight thru fifteen.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel Mary Magdalene and the other Mary encounter the risen Jesus. I know that I have harped often on this theme, but I do so only because the Bible harps on it—and also because the culture tends so thoroughly to miss the point. I’m talking about the meaning of Easter. Many people agree with David Cameron, the former Prime Minister of Great Britain, who once said that the message of Easter is "kindness, compassion, hard work, and responsibility."

Now, don’t get me wrong: I’m for all of those things. But so is, I would guess, any decent person from any religious or nonreligious background. Buddhists, Muslims, Hindus, Jews, and fair-minded atheists and agnostics would all sign on for those values.

None of it is getting anywhere near the heart of what Easter really means. What Easter means is that Jesus of Nazareth, who claimed throughout his public life to be speaking and acting in the very person of God, and who was brutally put to death by Roman executioners, rose bodily from the dead. That’s what it’s all about.
Video reflection by Monsignor James Vlaun: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.




Otherwise, 22 April would be the festival of Saint Soter, Pope (circa 119-174, the "Pope of Charity"), twelfth (XII) Bishop of Rome: Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Pontiffs-link & Wikipedia-link Pontiff.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Caius, Pope (circa 245-296, also spelt Gaius), twenty-eighth (XXVIII) Bishop of Rome: Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Pontiffs-link & Wikipedia-link Pontiff.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Theodore of Sykeon, Bishop (died 613, A.K.A. the Sykeote): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Arwald, Martyr (died 686), martyred in the reign of the West Saxon king Cædwalla: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Cædwalla later repented & converted to Christianity shortly before his death, & is remembered as St. Peter of Wessex [20 April].

'Twould also be the festival of Blessed Maria Gabriella, Religious, O.C.S.O. (1914-1939, A.K.A. Maria Sagheddu): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Christians of these last years of the Second Millennium, you have an honorable yet burdensome task. You must be bearers of the Word to those who have lost its full meaning & importance."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, feast day: 22 October)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"Still God cannot be giving me trials beyond my strength. He gave me the courage to sustain this one."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Have you ever noticed in the Apostles' Creed how quickly we pass over the earthly life of our Lord? Born, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, rose from the dead. We say nothing about the beatitudes, nothing about miracles. Just He was born, suffered, died, & rose again. Just those three. That's all there is in life. We're born; the earthly life is passed over, because all that matters concerning an earthly life is whether we are doing the will of God. And then, resurrection. First, we are born to Christ in baptism. Remember that our Lord was born into a sinful, sorrowful humanity. If we follow Him as a rule of life, we are born into that kind of a world: the poor, the afflicted, the sick, the ignorant. That is why Jesus' birth was in a stable. He identified with the poor. Here is the second great commandment: love your neighbor. The fundamental reason for loving our neighbor is because we're born into the same humanity that our Lord was born into, & we must help redeem it. Second, He suffered & was crucified. We suffer. Our Lord said, 'In this world you will have tribulation.' We are given crosses. We bear the cross for Him & with Him, recalling always what He did for us. And finally, He rose from the dead. Scripture says of our Blessed Lord, 'having joy set before Him, He endured the cross.' That means that in any kind of trial which we have, there should be a hidden gladness. Why? Because we're assured of the resurrection. Even though God does send us some kind of trial, if we've borne His cross, we can be absolutely sure of the crown."
—Venerable Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKApril


"Weird Al" Yankovic, "Your Horoscope for Today" from Running with Scissors (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

SKAmmentary: Such was the meteoric cultural prominence of ska-punk in the late '90s that "Weird Al" wrote a ska style parody, "Your Horoscope for Today."
"The stars predict that tomorrow you'll wake up to a bunch of stuff
And then go back to sleep…"

Saturday, April 20, 2019

Saints + Scripture: Paschal Triduum — Holy Saturday

Better Late than Never | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!


The Popish Plot
vLent 2019: "Holy Saturday"

'Tis Holy Saturday, act three of the Paschal Triduum (A.K.A. Easter Triduum): Holy Saturday-link & Wikipedia-link Holy Saturday; Wikipedia-link Paschal Triduum.


Commentary: Wayback Machine.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—The Resurrection of the Lord at the Easter Vigil in the Holy Night of Easter
I. The Book of Genesis, chapter one, verse one thru chapter two, verse two
(or, the Book of Genesis, chapter one, verses one & twenty-six thru thirty-one[a]);
Psalm One Hundred Four, verses one & two; five & six; ten; twelve, thirteen, & fourteen; twenty-four; & thirty-five;
or, Psalm Thirty-three, verses four thru seven, twelve & thirteen, & twenty & twenty-two;
II. The Book of Genesis, chapter twenty-two, verses one thru eighteen
(or, the Book of Genesis, chapter twenty-two, verses one, two, nine[a] thru thirteen, & fifteen thru eighteen);
Psalm Sixteen, verses five, eight, nine& ten, & eleven;
III. The Book of Exodus, chapter fourteen, verse fifteen thru chapter fifteen, verse one;
The Book of Exodus, chapter fifteen, verses one & two, three & four, five & six, & seventeen & eighteen;
IV. The Book of Isaiah, chapter fifty-four, verses five thru fourteen;
Psalm Thirty, verses two, four, five & six, eleven & twelve, & thirteen;
V. The Book of Isaiah, chapter fifty-five, verses one thru eleven;
The Book of Isaiah, chapter twelve, verses two & three, four, & five & six;
VI. The Book of Baruch, chapter three, verses nine thru fifteen & thirty-two thru chapter four, verse four;
Psalm Nineteen, verses eight, nine, ten, & eleven;
VII. The Book of Ezekiel, chapter thirty-six, verses sixteen, seventeen(a), & eighteen thru twenty-eight;
Psalm Forty-two, verses three & five & Psalm Forty-three, verses three & four;
or, the Book of Isaiah, chapter twelve, verses two & three, four(b/c/d), & five & six;
or, Psalm Fifty-one, verses twelve & thirteen, fourteen & fifteen, & eighteen & nineteen;
VIII. The Letter to the Romans, chapter six, verses three thru eleven;
Psalm One Hundred Eighteen, verses one & two, sixteen & seventeen, & twenty-two & twenty-three;
IX. The Gospel according to Mark, chapter sixteen, verses one thru seven.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, how wonderful are the readings for the Easter season! So full of theological depth, so spiritually rich, so marked by joy.

In light of the Resurrection, we know that God’s deepest intention for us is life, and life to the full. He wants death not to have the final word; he wants a renewal of the heavens and the earth.

Therefore, we have to stop living in the intellectual and spiritual space of death. We have to stop living intellectually in a world dominated by death and the fear of death. We have to adjust our attitudes in order to respond properly to what God really intends for us and the world.

Though we rarely admit it, we live in a death-haunted space. The fear of death broods over us like a cloud and conditions all of our thoughts and actions. What if we really believed, deep down, that death did not have the final word? Would we live in such fear, in such a cramped spiritual space? Or would we see that the protection of our egos is not the number one concern of our existence?

Reflect: When you think of your own death, what do you fear? How can belief in the Resurrection mollify those fears?
Video reflection by Marc DelMonico, Ph.D.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Video reflection by Tim Gray, Ph.D. (Augustine Institute): Day 40: Holy Saturday


Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 90
The Book of Deuteronomy, chapter six, verses four thru nine;
The Book of Deuteronomy, chapter thirty, verses eleven thru twenty.

Commentary: the Great Commandment (Deuteronomy, 6:4-9) & Exhortation to Choose Life (Deuteronomy, 30:11-20).



Otherwise, 20 April would be the commemoration of Saint Anicetus, Pope (died circa 166), eleventh (XI) Bishop of Rome: Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Pontiff-link, & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Twould also be the commemoration of Saint Peter of Wessex (circa 658-689; A.K.A. Cædwalla, also spelt Cadwallon, etc.; A.K.A. of Wales), King of Wessex: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Twould also be the commemoration of Saint Agnes of Montepulciano, Abbess, O.P. (1268-1317): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Twould also be the commemoration of Blesseds James Bell, Priest, & John Finch, Martyrs (died 1584), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I: Martyr-link Juliett Bravo & Wikipedia-link Juliett Bravo, Martyr-link Juliett Foxtrot & Wikipedia-link Juliett Foxtrot.

Commentary: Bl. James was a "Marian priest", as opposed to a "Seminary priest": Wikipedia-link Marian & Wikipedia-link Seminary.

'Twould also be the commemoration of Blessed Maurice MacKenraghty, Priest & Martyr (circa 1500-1585; in the Irish, Muiris mac Ionrachtaigh), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I, one of the Irish Martyrs: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link Éire & Wikipedia-link Éire.

'Twould also be the commemoration of Blesseds Richard Sergeant & William Thomson, Priests & Martyrs (died 1586), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I, two of the Eighty-five Martyrs of England & Wales: Martyr-link Romeo Sierra, Martyr-link Whiskey Tango, & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link England & Wales & Wikipedia-link England & Wales.

Commentary: Bls. Richard & William were "Seminary priests", as opposed to "Marian priests": Wikipedia-link Seminary & Wikipedia-link Marian.

'Twould also be the commemoration of Blessed Michel Coquelet, Priest & Martyr, O.M.I. (1931-1961), martyred by the Panthet Lao Communists, one of the seventeen Martyrs of Laos: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link (List); Wikipedia-link Laos.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"The readings in the Paschal Vigil carry us into the mysterious arena where human sin meets God's justice & mercy. There life & death 'have contended,' & there the victory of the risen Christ over death stands out as the source of our salvation & the model of Christian living."
—Pope St. Paul VI (1897-1978, feast day: 26 September)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"It is true that His Cross has been with me from the cradle, but for that Cross He has given me a passionate love."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"It is common for a creature in one stage of its existence to have a capacity for passing into a higher stage. But it is unusual for a creature to have a capacity which can be developed only by some agency outside of it & adapted to it. It is in this condition that man is born of his human parents. He is born with the capacity for life higher than that which he lives as an animal in this world. There is in him a capacity for becoming something different & higher. That capacity lies dormant & dead until the Holy Spirit comes & quickens it. The influence has to come from without. There must be the efficient touch of the Holy Spirit, the impartation of his life. The capacity to be a child of God is man's, but the development of this lies with God. We have to be quickened from without. We cannot give physical birth to ourselves, & we cannot give divine birth to ourselves."
—Venerable Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)

The Rebel Black Dot Exodus 90 Song o' Holy Saturday


Matt Maher, "The Waiting" from Saints and Sinners (The Last Angry Exodus Man)

Friday, April 19, 2019

Bonus! Exodus 90 Song o' Good Friday


Taizé, "Jesus, Remember Me" from Laudate Omnes Gentes (The Last Angry Exodus Man)

The Rebel Black Dot Exodus 90 Song o' Good Friday


The Daughters of Mary, "O Sacred Head Surrounded" from De Profundis (The Last Angry Exodus Man)

Saints + Scripture: Paschal Triduum — Good Friday

Better Late than Never | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!


The Popish Plot
vLent 2019: Good Friday, "Old Rugged Cross"

'Tis Good Friday, act two of the Paschal Triduum (A.K.A. Easter Triduum): Good Friday-link & Wikipedia-link Good Friday; Wikipedia-link Paschal Triduum.


Commentary: Wayback Machine.

Scripture of the Day
Liturgical Readings—Friday of the Passion of the Lord
The Book of Isaiah, chapter fifty-two, verse thirteen thru chapter fifty-three, verse twelve;
Psalm Thirty-one, verses two & six; twelve & thirteen; fifteen, sixteen, & seventeen; & twenty-five;
The Letter to the Hebrews, chapter four, verses fourteen, fifteen, & sixteen & chapter five, verses seven. eight, & nine;
The Gospel according to John, chapter eighteen, verse one thru chapter nineteen, verse forty-two.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, our Gospel today is John’s great account of the Passion of Jesus. The ultimate good—God incarnate—appeared, and we collectively responded not with exultation but with murderous violence. On Calvary, the Author of life was crucified and killed.

The crucifixion is the fullest expression of the divine anger at sin. We are meant to see on that cross not simply a violent display but rather our own ugliness. What brought Jesus to the cross? Stupidity, anger, mistrust, institutional injustice, betrayal of friends, denial, unspeakable cruelty, scapegoating, and fear.

But in the brutality of the cross we also see the fullest expression of the divine solidarity with sinners. God himself has come to stand with us in our dysfunction and absorb into his forgiveness all of the deadly sins. Yes, we know, with disquieting certitude, that we are sinners. But, with Paul, we willingly boast of our weakness, for we know with equal clarity that we are redeemed sinners.

Reflect: As you look at the Crucifix today, what do you see and what do you believe?
Video reflection by Deacon Bernard Nojadera: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Reflection from Array of Hope:
Today is the day that Love made history. After living on this earth for thirty-three years, preaching the Gospel, and performing many great miracles, Christ performed the ultimate act of love and died on the cross for us. He freely chose to be humiliated, violated, and sacrificed for our sake. Who else would do that for us?

In the Acts of the Apostles, St. Peter states that “Jesus [was] delivered up according to the definite plan and foreknowledge of God.” His death was no accident, and so much was at stake. God knew that the only way to bring His people back to Him would be through His son’s sacrifice. It’s hard to fathom this kind of sacrificial love, but this is the love that God freely pours out to each one of us. Would you do the same for the ones you love?

Today, do the Stations of the Cross and commemorate Christ's Passion. Let us look to the Cross and adore the one who is hung on it. Let us praise our Lord for loving us the way no one else can, for truly caring about us and redeeming us from our sins. Because of Him, we are one with God again and will one day be united with Him for all eternity in Heaven.
Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 89
The Book of Numbers, chapter twenty, verses one thru thirteen.

Commentary: The Waters of Meribah (Numbers, 20:1-13).



Otherwise, 19 April would be the commemoration of Saint Expeditus of Melitene, Martyr (died 303, A.K.A. Elpidius), martyred in the reign of the Roman emperors Diocletian & Maximian, a victim of the Great Persecution: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Persecution.

'Twould also be the commemoration of Saint Crescentius of Florence, Deacon (died circa 396): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link (List § "One of several saints… deacon of Saint Zenobius").

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Twould also be the commemoration of Saint Ursmar of Lobbes, Bishop & Abbot, O.S.B. (circa 640-713), second (II) abbot of Lobbes Abbey & co-founder of Aulne Abbey: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Lobbes & Wikipedia-link Aulne.

'Twould also be the commemoration of Saint Ælfheah of Canterbury, Bishop & Martyr, O.S.B. (circa 953-1012, A.K.A. of Winchester; also spelt Alphage), abbot of Bath Abbey, Bishop of Winchester, & later Archbishop of Canterbury; martyred by Vikings under the command of Thorkell the Tall: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Bath.

'Twould also be the commemoration of Saint Leo IX, Pope (1002-1054, "the Pilgrim Pope;" A.K.A. Bruno of Egisheim-Dagsburg), one hundred fifty-second (CLII) Bishop of Rome, who for all his holiness could not prevent the Great Schism (1054): Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Pontiff-link & Wikipedia-link Pontiff; & Wikipedia-link Schism.

'Twould also be the commemoration of Blessed James Duckett, Martyr (died circa 1601), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"The journey also brings sacrifices, but these must not stop us. Jesus is on the Cross: you want to kiss Him? You cannot help bending over the Cross & letting yourself be pricked by some thorns of the crown that is on the Lord's head."
—Pope Venerable John Paul I (1912-1978)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"It is true, you are the Mother of Jesus, but you have given Him to me; & He, from the Cross, has given you to be our Mother—thus we are richer than you!"
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Imagine a judge having before him his own son who committed murder. He killed a boy. Now there's no doubt whatever of the son's guilt. The father-judge, bound to execute justice, sentences his son to death. That is justice. Then he says to the son, 'Now I will take your place, I will die for you.' That would be mercy. But that is not the complete picture. Suppose that at the moment the son was sentenced to death, the boy that the son had murdered walked in alive. The son would say, 'How can you condemn me for murder? You said I killed this boy? You see, he's alive. I'm innocent, I should be free.' That's precisely the condition that we are in. We were guilty of sin but our Lord rose from the dead, took our guilt upon Himself, & washed it away. Now we can say, 'See, He's alive, He's not dead. I'm free.' So that's why He came."
—Venerable Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)

Thursday, April 18, 2019

Saints + Scripture: Paschal Triduum — Holy Thursday

Better Late than Never | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!


The Popish Plot
vLent 2019: "Holy Thursday 2019"

'Tis Holy Thursday (A.K.A. Maundy Thursday), the Thursday of Holy Week, act one of the Paschal Triduum (A.K.A. Easter Triduum): Holy Week-link & Wikipedia-link Holy Week, Holy Thursday-link & Wikipedia-link Holy Thursday, Wikipedia-link Paschal Triduum.


Commentary: Wayback Machine.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Chrism Mass
The Book of Isaiah, chapter sixty-one, verses one, two, three(a), six(a), eight(b), & nine;
Psalm Eighty-nine, verses twenty-one & twenty-two, twenty-five & twenty-seven;
The Book of Revelation, chapter one, verses five thru eight;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter four, verses sixteen thru twenty-one.

Commentary: Wikipedia-link Chrism Mass. Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, today’s Gospel recounts Jesus’ inaugural address in his hometown synagogue. Jesus reads words from the prophet Isaiah that he felt best summed up who he was and what his mission was. Therefore, it behooves us to listen carefully.

Jesus first says, "The spirit of the Lord is upon me." The
Ruach Yahweh, the breath of God, the spirit that hovered over the surface of the waters at the beginning of time, the life energy of God—this is what has seized and animated Jesus.

Animated by the
Ruach Yahweh, what does Jesus do? He brings "glad tidings to the poor," "liberty to captives," and "recovery of sight to the blind." In other words, he brings God’s love to those who are marginalized by injustice, freedom to those who are imprisoned in sin, and healing to those whose very self has been broken.

After the Paschal Mystery and Resurrection, he breathed on his disciples, communicating to them something of this spirit—and drawing them into this mission.

Reflect: Through baptism, we take up Christ’s mission during our lives. How have you brought "glad tidings to the poor," "liberty to captives," and "recovery of sight to the blind"?
Mass Readings—Evening Mass of the Lord's Supper
The Book of Exodus, chapter twelve, verses one thru eight & eleven thru fourteen;
Psalm One Hundred Sixteen, verses twelve & thirteen, fifteen & sixteen(b/c), & seventeen & eighteen;
The First Letter to the Corinthians, chapter eleven, verses twenty-three thru twenty-six;
The Gospel according to John, chapter thirteen, verses one thru fifteen.

Commentary: Reflection from Array of Hope:
“He loved His own in the world and He loved them to the end” (John, 13:1). Oftentimes this statement is overlooked. This beautiful, profound quote is in reference to the incredible mystery of Christ’s divinity being fully Man and fully God. Like us, Jesus had friends and family who He loved dearly. Despite the fact that most would abandon Him during His Passion, He still cared for each of them. Knowing that He was going to die and they would watch, truly broke His heart. They were His friends; He didn’t want them to suffer, but He knew it would happen. So, He washed the Apostles’ feet and commanded them to do the same to others. He wanted them to know that He served out of love and He desired them to follow His example and do the same.

We may never understand the magnitude of Christ’s love for us. It is unlike any other love on earth and goes beyond our human comprehension.We are His own in the world. He loves us to the end. Despite how many times we’ve sinned or betrayed Him, we are still loved and seen as His priceless sons and daughters. Jesus gave up everything for you and me. He held nothing back. Why do we do the opposite?

We are about to enter the Triduum; the final three days of Lent. In these final days, let us look to Christ and hold nothing back. As we await in the darkness, let us remain awake and journey with Christ as He begins to prepare for His passion, death and resurrection. Let us pursue lives of love and sacrifice as He did and think of ways we can honor and glorify Him in our own lives. Today, think of one thing you can do to change someone else’s life. It doesn’t have to be anything too extraordinary. The smallest acts of kindness can make the biggest impacts. Jesus washed our feet as a servant, so let us in turn wash one another’s feet.
Video reflection by the Reverend Daniel Merz: U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Video reflection by Sister Tonia Borsellino (uCatholic): Maundy Thursday.


Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 88
The Book of Numbers, chapter thirteen, verses one, two, & twenty-five thru thirty-three;
The Book of Numbers, chapter fourteen, verses one, two, three, & twenty-six thru thirty-four.

Commentary: Spies Sent into Canaan (Numbers, 13:1-2 & 25-33), the People Rebel (Numbers, 14:1-3), & God's Punishment of the Disobedient (Numbers, 14:26-34).



Otherwise, 18 April would also be the commemoration of Saint Perfectus of Córdoba, Priest & Martyr (died 850), martyred in the reign of the Andalusian king Abd ar-Rahman II, one of the forty-eight Martyrs of Córdoba: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Córdoba.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Twould also be the commemoration of Blessed Giacomo Oldo, Priest, T.O.S.F. (1364-1404, Anglicized as James Oldo): Blessed-link ūnus & Blessed-link duo.

'Twould also be the commemoration of Blessed Marie of the Incarnation, Religious, O.C.D. (1566-1618; A.K.A. Barbara Avrillot, Barbara Acarie): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Not to be confused with St. Marie of the Incarnation, O.S.U. [30 April].

'Twould also be the commemoration of Blessed Roman Archutowski, Priest & Martyr (1882-1943), martyred in the reign of the Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler, one of the One Hundred Eight Blessed Polish Martyrs: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link (List, № 63); Martyrs-link Polska & Wikipedia-link Polska.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"With the institution of the Eucharist, we enter into the very heart of humanity's drama. Will it be life directed toward death, or life open to eternity!"
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, feast day: 22 October)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"O Jesus, I know it, love is repaid by love alone, & so I searched & I found the way to solace my heart by giving you Love for Love."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"In the course of my life I have dealt with all kinds of people, with those who have been sinners & returned to the Lord & suffered much & had an indescribable joy. One of the most joyful figures I ever met in my life was a leper woman in Jamaica. She had lost her arms & half of her legs, but she was always smiling & happy & saying, 'But there's going to be a resurrection, & I will then have a glorified body.' That must be our attitude."
—Venerable Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

The Explorers' Club, № DCLXXXII

Operation AXIOM: After the World War—The Paris Peace Conference, Part III
11 April 1919: The Racial Equality Clause—The Japanese delegation proposed the League Covenant guarantee equal treatment of all League member's nationals; opposition was chiefly from Australia & the United States, both of which forbade Asian immigration; the majority of commissioners supported Japan's proposal, but were unilaterally overruled by the chairman, U.S. president Woodrow Wilson.





Lest we forget.