Wednesday, September 23, 2020

Operation ÖSTERREICH

Weekly Wednesday Weigh-in
Last weigh-in: 356.0 lbs (Wednesday, 2 September)
Commentary: It is a poor workman who blames his tools, 'tis true, but the mechanical scale produces wildly divergent weights depending on how I stand on it. I am very, very frustrated. I am considering acquiring a new electronic scale & then averaging the weights given by the mechanical & electronic scales. ÖSTERREICH needs reliable data!

A more anecdotal datum is that I am back to using the seventh hole on my principal belt, having had to clinch in one from the sixth hole to keep my pants in place.

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day

Fountains of Wayne, "Laser Show" from Utopia Parkway (Mike Papa Whiskey)

Tuesday, September 22, 2020

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day

The Mighty Mighty Bosstones, "Closer to Nowhere" from While We're at It (Rude Boy Mike Papa Whiskey)

Saints + Scripture

Simplex Complex Edition | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

'Tis the festival of Saint Maurice & the Theban Legion, Martyrs (died circa 286, A.K.A. the Martyrs of Agaunum), martyred in the reign of the Roman emperors Diocletian & Maximian: Martyr-link Mike & Wikipedia-link Mike; Martyrs-link Legion ūnus, Martyrs-link Legion duo, & Wikipedia-link Legion.
Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Septimus of Iesi, Bishop & Martyr (died 307), inaugural Bishop of Iesi (303-307), martyred in the reign of the Roman emperors Galerius & Constantine, a victim of the Diocletianic Persecution (303-313): Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Iesi; & Persecution-link, Wikipedia-link Diocletian ūnus, Wikipedia-link Diocletian duo, & Wikipedia-link Diocletian trēs.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Emmeram of Regensberg, Bishop & Martyr (died circa 652, A.K.A. Haimhramm, etc.), martyred by Lantpert of Bavaria while shielding another from Lantpert's wrath: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: My sources are uncertain as to the location of St. Emmeram's see; there is insuffucient data to render a judgment.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Sadalberga, Abbess (circa 605-670, also spelt Salaberga), founding abbess of the Abbey of Saint John the Baptist (641-670, originally of Our Lady), subject of the Vita Sadalbergae: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Abbey & Wikipedia-link Vita Sadalbergae.

Commentary: Sister of the bishop St. Leudinus Bodo [11 September], wife of St. Blandinus of Laon [?], & mother of Ss. Baldwin [16 October] & Anstrudis [17 October].

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Otto of Freising, Bishop & Abbot, O.Cist. (circa 1114-1158), twenty-second (XXII) Bishop of Freising (1137-1158), abbot of Morimond Abbey (1136-1137): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Diocese-link & Wikipedia-link Freising, & Wikipedia-link Morimond.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Thomas of Villanova, Bishop, O.S.A. (1488-1555, the "Father of the Poor" & "the Almsgiver;" A.K.A. Tomás García y Martínez), eighth (VIII) Archbishop of Valencia (1544-1555): Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, Saint-link trēs, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Valencia.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Ignatius of Santhià, Priest, O.F.M. Cap. (1686-1770, A.K.A. Lorenzo Maurizio Belvisotti): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Tuesday of the Twenty-fifth Week in Ordinary Time
The Book of Proverbs, chapter twenty-one, verses one thru six & ten thru thirteen;
Psalm One Hundred Nineteen (R/. thirty-five), verses one, twenty-seven, thirty, thirty-four, thirty-five, & forty-four;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter eight, verses nineteen, twenty, & twenty-one.

Commentary: Gospel reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel Jesus identifies his disciples as his family. I want to say something about our becoming disciples in his family. Once we make the decision to follow Jesus then every other claimant to supremacy must fall away.

As I’ve argued many times before, every one of us has something or some set of values that we consider greatest. Perhaps it is money, material things, power, or the esteem of others. Perhaps it is your family, your kids, your wife, your husband.

None of this is false, and none of these things are bad. But when you place any of them in the absolute center of gravity, things go awry. When you make any of them your ultimate or final good, your spiritual life goes haywire. When you attach yourself to any of them with an absolute tenacity, you will fall apart.

Only when we make Christ the cornerstone of our lives are we truly ready for mission. Keep in mind that every encounter with God in the Bible conduces to mission, to being sent to do the work of the Lord. If we try to do this work while we are stuck to any number of attachments, we will fail. Period.
Video reflection by Father John M. McKenzie (U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops): Daily Reflection.


Scripture Study—Day 91: Havel Highlands, Day 2
The Book of Ecclesiastes, chapter one, verses two thru eleven.

Commentary: All Is Vanity (cont'd; Ecclesiastes, 1:2-11).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"If today we are living in a climate of public freedom & personal responsibilty, we will have an increased duty to exercise our own critical moral judgment with vigilant assiduousness. Temptations are very widespread & aggressive in our day."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, r. 1978-2005; feast: 22 October)
Mother Teresa Quote o' the Day
"Joy is very infectious. We will never know just how much good a simple smile can do. Be faithful in little things. Smile at the people who cross your path. You have a beautiful smile. Don't waste it. Live beautifully. Smile at life. Smile everywhere you go. Smile at everyone you meet."
—St. Teresa of Calcutta, M.C. (1910-1997, feast: 5 September)
Commentary: The most damaging aspect of public mask-wearing is that we are no longer able to smile at each other, no longer able to spread that infectious joy. Yes, measures need to be taken to combat the pandemic, but I will never understand my co-religionists who care only for the casualties of the pandemic—the virus—& care nothing for the casualties of the panic—the loneliness, anxiety, & despair. The pandemic can only kill the body; the panic can kill both the body & the soul.

Saint Quote o' the Day
"Whenever your will weakens in your ordinary work, you must recall these thoughts: 'Study, work, is an essential part of my way. If I were discredited professionally as a consequence of my laziness it would make my work as a Christian useless or impossible. To attract & to help others, I need the influence of my professional reputation, & that is what God wants.'"
—St. Josemaría Escrivá (1902-1975, feast: 26 June)
Archbishop Sheen Quote o' the Day
"This death of Christ is an eternal act. We temporalize it; we spatialize it. Think of a great log that has been sawed in two. We see a number of circles on either side of that cut log. Those circles, we know, run all the way up through the log. That's the sacrifice of Christ. It runs through history, from the very beginning, when God made an animal skin for the first parents to hide their shame; it runs through all of the symbolic sacrifices of the Jews; & it runs up to Calvary & from Calvary on into heaven itself. In fact, it began with the Lamb: slain, as it were, from the beginning of the world. Now we redo that sacrifice. Scripture says that Christ can never die again. If Christ can only die once, why do we say the Mass is a sacrifice & He dies again? Of course our Lord can never die again in the human nature which He took from Mary. But at the beginning of every Mass, He looks out & says: Peter, Paul, Mary, John, Ann, give Me your human natures. I will die again in you, & your death will be the pledge of your resurrection, as Mine was the model."
—Ven. Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)

Monday, September 21, 2020

The Rebel Black Dot Exodus 90 Song o' the Day

Alan Powell, "Chasing after the Wind" from The Song Album: Music from the Motion Picture (Mike Papa Whiskey)

Commentary: For the "Day 91" exercise beginning today, my fraternity is reading the Book of Ecclesiastes.
"What do we mean
If nothing has meaning?
If in the end,
We're chasing after wind?…

"I have everything,
But that don't leave me anything,
I had my plans
Crumble into sand,
Now I understand
I was born a natural man,
Racing to the end
Chasing after wind…

"Why should I be
If nothing has made me?
All that I've done,
The flame I wear, the sun,
Why should I sing
If nothing has meaning?"

Saints + Scripture: Feast of Saint Matthew

Simplex Complex Edition | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

The Popish Plot
"Christian Click Bait"

'Tis the Feast of Saint Matthew, Apostle & Evangelist (floruit first century, A.K.A. Levi), author of the Gospel according to Matthew: Apostle-link ūnus, Apostle-link duo, Apostle-link trēs, Apostle-link Array of Hope, & Wikipedia-link; Apostles-link & Wikipedia-link Apostles; & Wikipedia-link Evanglists & Wikipedia-link Gospel.
Commentary: Wayback Machine.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Feast of St. Matthew
The Letter to the Ephesians, chapter four, verses one thru seven, eleven, twelve, & thirteen;
Psalm Nineteen (R/. five), verses two & three, four & five;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter nine, verses nine thru thirteen.

Commentary: Gospel reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, today’s Gospel celebrates the call of Matthew. Jesus tells the tax collector, “Follow me.”

The call of Jesus addresses the mind, but it moves through the mind into the body, and through the body into the whole of one’s life, into the most practical decisions. “Follow me” has the sense of “apprentice to me” or “walk as I walk; think as I think; choose as I choose; see as I see.” Discipleship entails an entire reworking of the self according to the pattern and manner of Jesus.

Upon hearing the address of the Lord, Matthew “got up and followed him.” The Greek word behind “got up” is
anastas, the same word used to describe the Resurrection (anastasis) of Jesus from the dead. Following Jesus is indeed a kind of resurrection from the dead, since it involves the transition from a lower form of life to a higher.

Those who have undergone a profound conversion tend to speak of their former life as a kind of illusion, something not entirely real. The father of the prodigal son can say, “This son of mine was dead, and has come to life again.” So conversion is an
anastasis, a rising from death.
Video reflection by Monsignor James Vlaun (U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops): Daily Reflection.

Video reflection by Curtis Mitch (St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology): Daily Reflection.


Scripture Study—Day 91: Havel Highlands, Day 1
The Book of Ecclesiastes, chapter one, verse one.

Commentary: All Is Vanity (Ecclesiastes, 1:1).

'Tis also the festival of Saint Iphigenia of Ethiopia, Virgin (floruit first century, A.K.A. of Abyssinia; also spelt Ephigenia): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Gerulfus, Martyr (circa 740-748, also spelt Gerulph), martyred by a kinsman, whom he pardoned with his dying breath: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Saint François Jaccard, Priest & Martyr, M.E.P. (1799-1838), martyred in the reign of the Vietnamese emperor Minh Mạng (Nguyễn dynasty), one of the Martyrs of Vietnam: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link (List); Martyrs-link Vietnam & Wikipedia-link Vietnam.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Laurent-Joseph-Marius Imbert, Bishop & Martyr, M.E.P. (1796-1839; A.K.A. Laurant-Maria-Joseph Imbert, Imbert Bum, Bum Se-hyeong), martyred in the reign of the Korean king Heonjong (Joseon dynasty), one of the Martyrs of Korea: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link Korea & Wikipedia-link Korea.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Manuel Torró García, Martyr (1902-1936), martyred by Communist Spanish "Republicans" (Rojos), one of the two hundred thirty-thres Martyrs of València: Martyr-link ūnus & Martyr-link duo; Martyr-link València & Wikipedia-link València.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"The Incarnate Word of God continues to speak to the Church through the sacred books. In reading & studying the Scriptures, Christians seek to know God & to understand God's plan for the human family."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, r. 1978-2005; feast: 22 October)
Mother Teresa Quote o' the Day
"In the West you have another kind of poverty, spiritual poverty. This is far worse. People do not believe in God, do not pray. People do not care for each other. You have the poverty of people who are dissatisfied with what they have, who do not know how to suffer, who give in to despair. This poverty of heart is often more difficult to relieve & to defeat."
—St. Teresa of Calcutta, M.C. (1910-1997, feast: 5 September)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"'Mary kept all these things in her heart.' Discipline does not seem at all heavy when it goes together with a clean & sincere love. Even if it costs you a lot, it unites you to the Loved One."
—St. Josemaría Escrivá (1902-1975, feast:26 June)

Sunday, September 20, 2020

The Explorers' Club, № DCCLXXIII

Operation AXIOM: After the World War—The German Revolution, Part XII
6 June 1920: The German federal election—The centre-left coalition in the Reichstag splintered over the bloody suppression of the Ruhr Uprising compared to the lenient approach toward the Kapp Putsch; the Social Democratic Party remained the largest party, but lost a third of its seats; more radical left- & right-wing parties gained seats, charting a course of instability for the Weimar Republic.
Lest we forget.

The Wayback Machine Tour of the German Revolution
№ DCLII: The Kiel Mutiny (Part I)
№ DCLV: The Abdication of Wilhelm II (Part II)
№ DCLXIII: German Freikorps & Austrian Heimwehr (Part III)
№ DCLXIV: The Weihnachtskämpfe ("Christmas Eve struggle") (Part IV)
№ DCLXVI: The German Workers Party (D.A.P.) was founded (Part V)
№ DCLXVII: The Sparticist Uprising (Part VI)
№ DCLXXX: The Bavarian Soviet Republic (Part VII)
№ DCCXII: Adolf Hitler's first public speech (Part VIII)
№ DCCXXXIV: The National Socialist Program (Part IX)
№ DCCLXVII: The Kapp Putsch (Part X)
№ DCCLXX: The Ruhr Uprising (Part XI)

Saints + Scripture: XXV Sunday in Tempus per annum

Simplex Edition | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

'Tis the Twenty-fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time (Tempus per annum, "time through the year"): Wikipedia-link.

Scripture of the Week
Mass Readings—Twenty-fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time
The Book of Isaiah, chapter fifty-five, verses six thru nine;
Psalm One Hundred Forty-five (R/. eighteen[a]), verses two & three, eight & nine, & seventeen & eighteen;
The Letter to the Philippians, chapter one, verses twenty(c) thru twenty-four & twenty-seven(a);
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter twenty, verses one thru sixten(a).

Commentary: Gospel reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, the parable of the vineyard that Jesus tells in today’s Gospel is one of the most disturbing of all. Keep in mind that upsetting us is one of the main purposes of a parable, stories that invent new worlds by inverting this one.

We know the outline of the story well: a landowner goes out to hire workers for his field, hiring them at different times during the day. Then, at the close of work, he pays each the same wage. When those hired earlier complain, the owner contends, “Am I not free to do as I wish with my own money? Are you envious because I am generous?”

Do any of us really find this answer satisfying? Don’t most of us instinctually side with the complainers? Have you noticed that the one virtue that even little children seem implicitly to understand is justice: “It’s just not fair!” Well, this just doesn’t seem fair.

But we should squint at this story through the lens of the prophet Isaiah’s reminder that God’s ways are not our ways. Does this story represent an undermining of justice? No; rather, it is a showing forth of the justice that flows from God’s vision of things.
Video reflection by Father Greg Friedman, O.F.M. (U. S. C. of Catholic Bishops): Daily Reflection.

Video reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire): Sunday Sermon.

Audio reflection by Scott Hahn, Ph.D. (St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology): Breaking the Bread.


Papal Quote o' the Day
"We must have our own deep, continual inward life of prayer, of faith, of charity. Without that we cannot participate usefully & wisely in the rebirth & reflowering of the liturgy. We cannot think, beathe, act, suffer, & fully hope with the living pilgrim Church. We must pray."
—Pope St.Paul VI (1897-1978, r. 1963-1978; feast: 29 May)
Mother Teresa Quote o' the Day
"Forgiveness is at the heart of healthy relationships. Excuse rather than accuse. Forgive & ask to be forgiven. Forgiveness is a beautiful gift to give to those who hurt us."
—St. Teresa of Calcutta, M.C. (1910-1997, feast: 5 September)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"From my prison, the 19th of November, 1927. I shall probably never see you again in this life. It is God who disposes it thus. I accept His designs & I bless Him for all of them. I have never judged myself necessary! I am nothing but a poor instrument in the hands of God. If He no longer wishes to use me, it is because He wishes to take up another!"
—Bl. Miguel Pro, S.J. (1891-1927, feast: 23 November)

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Lord's Day: XXV

Sarah Kroger, "O God Beyond All Praising" from Origin (A Beauty Initiative within F.O.C.U.S.) (St. Mike Papa Whiskey)

Bonus! Song o' the Last 24 Hours

Marco Beltrami & Buck Sanders, "Le Mans 59" from Ford v. Ferrari: Original Score (Mike Papa Whiskey)

Commentary: At this hour, at the Circuit de la Sarthe in Le Mans, France, the 88th running of the 24 Hours of Le Mans (88e 24 Heures du Mans) is drawing to a close. The "grand prix of endurance & efficiency" is traditionally run within a week or ten days of the summer solstice. This year's 88th edition was originally scheduled for 13-14 June, but was delayed due to the pandemic & panic. In place of the race during that original weekend, an e-sports (video game) race was held—the "24 Hours Virtual": Start-link & Finish-link. This year's race is being held on the weekend closest to the autumnal equinox.

The
Automobile Club de l'Ouest (A.C.O.), the organizers of the great race, in consultation with the local government authorities in France, decided to hold this year's race "behind closed doors"—without fans. The Circuit de la Sarthe is eight & a half miles long (8.467 miles/13.626 kilometers), & yet they couldn't find room for even a few thousand socially-distanced fans? I've only ever watched the 24 Heures du Mans on television, never yet in person, but because the A.C.O. has decided that fans are not essential to the great race, I've decided that the great race is not essential for me as a fan. I didn't wake up in time to watch the start of the race yesterday morning. I didn't stay up all night watching the race. As this post publishes, I'm at church for the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, not watching the finish of the race. I missed seeing this year's 24 Hours of Le Mans; only time will tell is if I missed the 24 Hours of Le Mans.

Saturday, September 19, 2020

The Queue: Reader's Block

I found myself making little progress through both Life of Christ & The Frozen Lighthouse; so, to get things moving again, I jumped The Rage against God by Peter Hitchens up from way down the queue.

The Rage against God was commissioned by Zondervan, the Grand Rapids-based publisher, in part as a response to Peter Hitchens's then-living brother (2010) Christopher Hitchens's far-famed atheist polemic, God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything. (I did not mourn Christopher Hitchens when he died in 2011, but I did pray for the repose of his soul.) I cannot judge The Rage against God as a counterpoint to God Is Not Great because I've not read the latter. However, as a believer I did not find The Rage against God particularly convincing, probably because, in Hitchens's own words:
I am neither a theologian nor even a Bible scholar. Nor am I a philosopher, nor a "public intellectual," whatever that may be. I don't think I am even an intellectual in private, just a jobbing newspaper scribbler who has spend more than thirty years in the University of Fleet Street.
The strongest part of The Rage against God is "Part 1: A Personal Journey through Atheism," the autobiographical portion; Part 1 is longer than Parts 2 & 3 combined, & could well have been, perhaps ought to have been expanded into a book all its own. The book's greatest weakness is that Hitchens leaves the impression, arguing as neither a theologian nor a Bible scholar, that the best reasons to believe in God are those advanced during the self-styled "Enlightenment": social cohension & public morality. Hitchens disdains the civic religion of twentieth century England (chapter five, "Britain's Pseudo-Religion and the Cult of Winston Churchill"), but what he principally offers is its place is the civic religion of seventeenth century England, the King James Bible & the Book of Common Prayer. Hitchens references his "robust English Protestantism" & conveys the definite impression that the central tenant of his faith is England. This impression is strengthened by a gratuitously Elizabethan swipe at the Spanish Inquisition:
Which has been the starting point of the secret policeman & the Inquisition merchant (see, I'm against the Spanish Inquisition, too, as any English schoolboy reared on tales of Drake & Raleigh & Grenville must be) down all the centuries.
Written as if the same "robust English Protestantism" which produced the King James Bible & the Book of Common Prayer hadn't financed its own secret policemen—replete with an Anglo-Scottish inquisition—by plundering the monasteries, & hadn't created the profession of priest-hunting, murdering Christians for the supposed crime of considering Jesus Christ the Head of the Church, rather than the reigning Tudor monarch.
Hitchens's most valuable contribution is taking to task the gravely compromised Christianity that fatally underminded its own moral authority by canonizing the horrors of the World Wars (1914-1918 & 1939-1945), a Christianity that prized patriotism over fidelity to the Gospel, but he undercuts his own case by pledging his allegiance to an equally egregiously comprised Christianity, twenty-first century Anglicanism.

Still, I made fairly quick work of The Rage against God, accomplishing the primary purpose of jump-starting my reading.

Recently
Edward Sri, No Greater Love: A Biblical Walk through Christ's Passion
Sam Guzman, The Catholic Gentleman: Living Authentic Manhood Today
Peter Hitchens, The Rage against God: How Atheism Led Me to Faith

Currently
Lily Collins, Unfiltered: No Shame, No Regrets, Just Me
Fulton J. Sheen, Life of Christ
M. K. Mace, The Frozen Lighthouse

Presently
Cy Kellett, Ad Limina
Flannery O'Connor, Flannery O'Connor Collection
Michael Gorn, N.A.S.A.: The Complete Illustrated History

Saints + Scripture

Better Late than Never | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

The Popish Plot
"(Our Lady of) La Salette"

'Tis the Optional Memorial of Saint Januarius, Bishop & Martyr (died circa 305, of Naples), inaugural Bishop of Benevento (305), martyred in the reign of the Roman emperors Diocletian & Maximian, a victim of the Diocletianic Persecution (303-313); whose relics are subject to a recurring blood miracle: Martyr-link ūnus, Martyr-link duo, Wikipedia-link, & Wikipedia-link Feast of San Gennaro; Wikipedia-link Benevento; Persecutions-link, Wikipedia-link Diocletian ūnus, & Wikipedia-link Diocletian duo; & Wikipedia-link Blood Miracle.
Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Tis also the festival of Our Lady of La Salette (apparition 19 September 1846): Madonna-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Saints Constantia & Felix of Nocera, Martyrs (died 68) martyred in the reign of the Roman emperor Nero, victims of the Neronian Persecution (64-68): Martyr-link Charlie, Martyr-link Foxtrot, & Wikipedia-link; Persecution-link, Wikipedia-link Nero ūnus, & Wikipedia-link Nero duo.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Theodore of Canterbury, Bishop (602-690, the "Second Founder of Canterbury;" A.K.A. of Tarsus), seventh (VII) Archbishop of Canterbury (668-690), who convened the Council of Hereford (672): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Diocese-link, Wikipedia-link Canterbury, & Wikipedia-link Archbishops; & Wikipedia-link Hereford.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Maria de Cervellione, Religious (1230-1290, "Maria of Help"), founding superior of the Third Order (1265) of the Mercedarians (O. de M.), formally the Royal, Celestial, & Military Order of Our Lady of Mercy & the Redemption of the Captives: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Third Order, Order-link O. de M. & Wikipedia-linkO. de M.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Émilie de Rodat, Religious, S.F. (1787-1852, A.K.A. Marie Guillemette Emilie de Rodat), foundress of the Sisters of the Holy Family of Villefranche (1815, S.F.): Saint-link ūna, Saint-link duæ, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link S.F.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Saturday of the Twenty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time
The First Letter to the Corinthians, chapter fifteen, verses thirty-five, thirty-six, thirty-seven, & forty-two thru forty-nine;
Psalm Fifty-six (R/. fourteen), verses ten(c), eleven, & twelve; thirteen & fourteen;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter eight, verses four thru fifteen.

Commentary: Gospel reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel, Jesus explains the purpose of the parables: “Knowledge of the mysteries of the Kingdom of God has been granted to you; but to the rest, they are made known through parables so that they may look but not see, and hear but not understand.”

The use of the word “para” in the New Testament signals the failures to see at various levels. The great metaphor here is the blindness of the Jews, a blindness which is identified with disobedience.

The parables of Christ are meant to highlight and point out this blindness, this willful refusal to see. They themselves, in their peculiar form, are judgments on those who cannot see in them signs of salvation.

The parables are often exercises whose purpose is to confuse and confound the hearer, overturning her expectations and upsetting her theological convictions. A parable does its work by turning our ordinary conception of the spiritual world upside-down. And we would be greatly remiss if we did not attend to the instruction that emerges from those startling, funny, off-putting, and strangely enlightening stories that Jesus loved to tell.
Video reflection by Father Pierre Toussaint Guiteau, C.F.R. (U. S. C. of C. Bishops): Daily Reflection.

Mass Readings—Optional Memorial of St. Januarius
The Letter to the Hebrews, chapter ten, verses thirty-two thru thirty-six;
Psalm One Hundred Twenty-six (R/. five), verses one(b/c) & two(a/b), two(c/d) & three, four & five, & six;
The Gospel according to John, chapter twelve, verses twenty-four, twenty-five, & twenty-six.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Humankind has more than the right to peace. It has also the right that all should pledge themselves to get rid of the causes that foment conflicts within a nation & between nations."
—Pope St. Paul VI (1897-1978, r. 1963-1978; feast: 29 May)
Mother Teresa Quote o' the Day
"What are you hiding? What do you do in secret? Doing things in secret, hiding, these things are the beginning of lying."
—St. Teresa of Calcutta, M.C. (1910-1997, feast: 5 September)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"How did I come to this state? What are my claims? What are my merits? Only the mercy & love of God can explain them."
—Bl. Miguel Pro, S.J. (1891-1927, feast: 23 November)

Saints + Scriptures — Please Stand By

'Tis the Saturday of the Twenty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time.

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' Talk Like a Pirate Day

Less Than Jake, "Channel 16 (FreeCreditReport.com Jingle—Pirate)" from the T.V. E.P. (Mike Papa Whiskey)

Friday, September 18, 2020

Saints + Scripture

'Tis the festival of Saint Ariadne of Phrygia, Martyr (died circa 130), martyred in the reign of the Roman emperor Hadrian: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Eustrogius of Milan, Bishop (died circa 349), Archbishop of Milan (343-349): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Diocese-link & Wikipedia-link Milan.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Eumenes the Thaumaturgus, Bishop (died circa 680), Archbishop of Crete (667-680): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Crete.

Commentary: "Thaumaturgus" is an epithet meaning "Wonder-worker" (miracle-worker).

'Tis also the festival of Saint Hygbald, Abbot, O.S.B. (died circa 690; also spelt Hybald, etc.), abbot of Bardney Abbey: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Bardney.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Richardis of Andlau, Religious, O.S.B. (circa 839-895; A.K.A. of Swabia, of Alsace; also spelt Richgard), Holy Roman Empress, foundress of Andlau Abbey (880): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Andlau.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Joseph of Cupertino, Priest, O.F.M. Conv. (1603-1663, the "Flying Friar;" A.K.A. Giuseppe Maria Desa): Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, Saint-link trēs, & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Józef Kut, Priest & Martyr (1905-1942), martyred in the reign of the Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler, one of the One Hundred Eight Blessed Polish Martyrs: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link Polska & Wikipedia-link Polska.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Friday of the Twenty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time
The First Letter to the Corinthians, chapter fifteen, verses twelve thru twenty;
Psalm Seventeen (R/. fifteen[b]), verses one(b/c/d); six, seven, & eight(b); & fifteen;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter eight, verses one, two, & three.

Commentary: Gospel reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel, we learn that some women accompanied Jesus and provided for him and the Twelve from their resources. Jesus invited women into full participation in the life of discipleship.

All of those women sat in eager discipleship at the feet of Jesus. Now, don’t get me wrong! I’m not advocating the contemporary feminist agenda, which often runs rough-shod over the real differences that obtain between men and women.

But I am urging you to see the radicality of Jesus’ call to discipleship, which cuts through so many of the social conventions of his time and ours. I am urging you to see that everyone—rich and poor, those on the inside and those on the outs, men and women—are summoned to discipleship and that this summons is the most important consideration of all.

Given all of this, can we see these women disciples as forerunners of all of the great women who have followed Jesus over the centuries? Can we see them as prototypes of Teresa of Avila, Joan of Arc, Clare of Assisi, Thérèse of Lisieux, Mother Teresa of Kolkata, Katharine Drexel, Edith Stein, and Dorothy Day?
Video reflection by the Reverend Jason Martini (U. S. C. of Catholic Bishops): Daily Reflection.

Video reflection by Doctor John Bergsma (St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology): Daily Reflection.


Scripture Study—Pierced Hands Bible Reading Plan: Day 45
The Letter to the Romans, chapter one (verses one thru thirty-two);
The Letter to the Romans, chapter two (verses one thru twenty-nine);
The Book of the Psalms, psalm forty-five (verses one thru seventeen);
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter twenty-one, verses thirty-three thru forty-six.

Commentary: Salutation (Romans, 1:1-7), Prayer of Thanksgiving (Romans, 1:8-15), the Power of the Gospel (Romans, 1:16-17), God's Wrath against Man's Wickedness (Romans, 1:18-32), the Righteous Judgment of God (Romans, 2:1-16), & the Jews & the Law (Romans, 2:17-29); Ode to a Royal Wedding (Psalm 45); & the Parable of the Wicked Tenants (Matthew, 21:33-41) & the Stone Which the Builders Rejected (Matthew, 21:42-46).

Scripture Study—Pierced Hands Bible Reading Plan: Day 46
The Letter to the Romans, chapter three (verses one thru thirty-one);
The Letter to the Romans, chapter four (verses one thru twenty-five);
The Book of the Psalms, psalm forty-six (verses one thru eleven);
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter twenty-two, verses one thru fourteen.

Commentary: The Jews & the Laws (cont'd; Romans, 3:1-8), None Is Righteous (Romans, 3:9-20), Righteousness through Faith (Romans, 3:21-31), the Example of the Faith of Abraham (Romans, 4:1-12), & God's Promise Realized through Faith (Romans, 4:13-25); God's Defense of His City & People (Psalm 46); & the Parable of the Marriage Feast (Matthew, 22:1-14).

Scripture Study—Pierced Hands Bible Reading Plan: Day 47
The Letter to the Romans, chapter five (verses one thru twenty-one);
The Letter to the Romans, chapter six (verses one thru twenty-three);
The Book of the Psalms, psalm forty-seven (verses one thru nine);
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter twenty-two, verses fifteen thru thirty-three.

Commentary: Results of Justification (Romans, 5:1-11), Adam & Christ (Romans, 5:12-Z), Dying & Rising with Christ (Romans, 6:1-14), & Slaves of Sin or of Righteousness (Romans, 6:15-23); God's Rule over the Nations (Psalm 47); & the Question about Paying Taxes (Matthew, 22:15-22) & the Question about Man's Resurrection (Matthew, 22:23-33).

Papal Quote o' the Day

"The voice of the Church is like the voice of a mother: it may seem monotonous at times. However, it has a tone of tenderness & of strength that keeps us from evil & saves us."
—Pope St. John XXIII (1881-1963, r. 1958-1963; feast: 11 October)
Mother Teresa Quote o' the Day
"Confess your win & be finished with it. God's mercy is greater than your sin. Don't be afraid, scrupulous, or anxious. You are a sinner full of sin when you go to Confession, & when you come out you are a sinner without sin. But alwaus, before everythign else & after everything else, you are a child of God."
—St. Teresa of Calcutta, M.C. (1910-1997, feast: 5 September)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"O my Lord Jesus, whose love for me has been so great as to bring Thee down from heaven to save me, teach me, dear Lord, my sin—teach me its heinousness—teach me truly to repent of it—and pardon it in Thy great mercy!"
—St. John Henry Newman, C.O. (1801-1890, feast: 9 October)
Archbishop Sheen Quote o' the Day
"Besides apathy & antipathy, there was empathy, the few chosen souls at the foot of the cross. You see, the cross unites not only the friends of our Lord, the cross unites enemies. We will begin to see as the world goes on, a new kind of bigotry. We will be opposed not because we believe, for example, in the supremacy of the Holy Father, but because we are standing in the way of the demoralization of the world. We stand for life against death. We stand for the family against divorce. We stand for purity against fornication. We stand for goodness instead of vice. We are the great obstacle to the world. The new bigotry will see that cross & will hate us. So we have to be prepared for it, & we have to take our stand underneath it."
—Ven. Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day

Smash Mouth, "Home" from Astro Lounge (Mike Papa Whiskey)

Thursday, September 17, 2020

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day

Jimmy Eat World, "The Middle" from Jimmy Eat World (Mike Papa Whiskey)

Commentary:

"Hey, don't write yourself off yet,
It's only in your head you feel left out & looked down on,
Just try your best,
Try everything you can,
And don't you worry what they tell themselves when you're away…

"Hey, don't write yourself off yet,
It's only in your head you feel left out & looked down on,
Just do your best,
Do everything you can,
And don't you worry what their bitter hearts are gonna say…"

Saints + Scripture

Better Late than Never | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

'Tis the Optional Memorial of Saint Robert Bellarmine, Bishop & Doctor of the Church, S.J. (1542-1621), Archbishop of Capua (1602-1605): Doctor-link ūnus, Doctor-link duo, Doctor-link trēs & Wikipedia-link; Diocese-link & Wikipedia-link Capua; & Doctors-link & Wikipedia-link Doctors.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Lambert of Maastricht, Bishop & Martyr (circa 635-705), Bishop of Maastricht (669-705), founder of Munsterbilzen Abbey (670), martyred whilst celebrating Mass in the reign of the Frankish warlord Pepin II: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Diocese-link, Wikipedia-link Maastricht, & Wikipedia-link Bishops; & Wikipedia-link Munsterbilzen.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Unni of Bremen, Bishop (died 936), Archbishop of Hamburg & Bishop of Bremen (917-936): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Hamburg & Wikipedia-link Hamburg-Bremen.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Hildegard of Bingen, Abbess & Doctor of the Church, O.S.B. (1098-1179, the "Sibyl of the Rhine"), whose visions are recorded in the Scivias ("Sci vias Domini," "Know the Ways of the Lord"): Doctor-link ūna, Doctor-link duæ, & Wikipedia-link; Doctors-link & Wikipedia-link Doctors; & Wikipedia-link Scivias.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Pedro de Arbués, Priest & Martyr, C.R.S.A. (circa 1441-1485), martyred by Conversos whilst at prayer in the cathedral of Zaragosa: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Zygmunt Szczęsny Feliński, Bishop, T.O.S.F. (1822-1895), ninth (IX) Archbishop of Warsaw (1862-1883) & founder of the Franciscan Sisters of the Family of Mary (1857, R.M.): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Warsaw & Wikipedia-link Bishops, & Wikipedia-link R.M.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Thursday of the Twenty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time
The First Letter to the Corinthians, chapter fifteen, verses one thru eleven;
Psalm One Hundred Eighteen (R/. one), verses one(b) & two, sixteen(a/b) & seventeen, & twenty-eight;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter seven, verses thirty-six thru fifty.

Commentary: Gospel reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):

Friends, in today’s Gospel, Jesus exposes and corrects a Pharisee’s strict religiosity. We can see throughout the Gospels how Jesus judges religion itself, including this narrative of the “sinful woman” in the house of Simon the Pharisee.

Imagine Simon’s shock that the woman’s arrival precipitated—this intrusion of an uninvited guest into a proper dinner party. Then she intensifies the unease when she stands behind Jesus, weeping onto his feet, drying them with her hair, and then anointing them with oil.

There are several aspects to Simon’s reaction, each one reflective of a dimension of the religiously toned
pusilla anima (small soul). Simon is, first of all, dismayed at the social upset this woman’s appearance has caused. Secondly, Simon notices—and undoubtedly rejoices in—Jesus’ apparent inability to read the heart of the intruder. Jesus clearly is not as religiously careful as Simon himself.

How does all of this constitute a judgment on Simon’s religiosity? The Pharisee is so concerned with propriety and cultic purity that
he simply doesn’t see the presence of grace around him. Simon’s religion presupposes the fundamentally egotistic conviction that divine favor is won through human achievement. Jesus punctures this illusion of the pusilla anima.
Video reflection by Deacon Harold Burke-Sivers (U. S. C. of Catholic Bishops): Daily Reflection.

Video reflection by Becket Ghioto (St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology): Daily Reflection.


Mass Readings—Optional Memorial of St. Robert Bellarmine
The Book of Wisdom, chapter seven, verses seven thru ten, fifteen, & sixteen;
Psalm Nineteen (R/. ten), verses eight, nine, ten, & eleven
(or, R/. the Gospel according to John, chapter six, verse sixty-three);
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter seven, verses twenty-one thru twenty-nine.

Papal Quote o' the Day

"The first requirement for a constant listening to Christ is the full knowledge of yourselves. A methodical & intelligent work of your personal life will open you to the perceptive & joyful formation of the new self."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, r. 1978-2005; feast: 22 October)
Mother Teresa Quote o' the Day
"We learn humility through accepting humiliations cheerfully. Do not let a chance pass you by. It is so easy to be proud, harsh, moody, & selfish, but we have been created for greater things. Why stoop down to things that will spoil the beauty of our hearts?"
—St. Teresa of Calcutta, M.C. (1910-1997, feast: 5 September)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Pray that God will console you when you feel the burden of the Cross, for in doing so you are in no way acting against the will of God, but you are placing yourself beside the Son of God Who asked His Father during the Agony in the Garden to send Him some relief. But if He is not willing to give it be ready to pronounce the same ‘Fiat,’ ‘So be it,’ that Jesus did."
—St. Pius of Pietrelcina, O.F.M. Cap. (1887-1968, feast: 23 September)
Archbishop Sheen Quote o' the Day
"The cross itself, just that figure, is the symbol of absurdity, because the upright bar of life is contradicted by the horizontal bar of death. The ego is contradicted by the other-ego, the negation of identity. By itself, it is the symbol of absurdity. But if you put someone on it, who teaches the lesson that death is the condition of life, then the cross is no longer absurd. Then it becomes a philosophy of life."
—Ven. Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)

Saints + Scripture — Please Stand By

 'Tis the Thursday of the Twenty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time.


Wednesday, September 16, 2020

The Explorers' Club, № DCCLXXII

Operation AXIOM: After the World War—The Red Scare, Part XIV
16 September 1920: The Wall Street Bombing—Forty persons were killed & hundreds wounded—one hundred forty-three seriously—when a horse-drawn wagon exploded during a busy lunch time; the bomb contained an estimated one hundred pounds of dynamite & five hundred pounds of cast-iron, to produce shrapnel; the "American Anarchist Fighters" claimed credit in flyers found near the carnage.






Lest we forget.

The Wayback Machine Tour of the Red Scare
№ DCLXXII: The Seattle General Strike (Part I)
№ DCLXXV: The Overman Committee (Part II)
№ DCLXXXI: The Lusk Committee (Part III)
№ DCLXXXV: The Anarchist Mail-Bombing Campaign (Part IV)
№ DCLXXXVI: The Cleveland May Day Riots (Part V)
№ DCXCI: The Anarchist Bombing Campaign (Part VI)
№ DCXCIV: "Bloody Saturday" in the Winnipeg General Strike (Part VII)
№ DCCI: The Chicago Race Riot (Part VIII)
№ DCCVI: The Boston Police Strike (Part IX)
№ DCCIX: The Steel Strike of 1919 (Part X)
№ DCCXV: The Palmer Raids (Part XI)
№ DCCXVIII: The Centralia Massacre (Part XII)
№ DCCXLVI: The May Day "Revolution" (Part XIII)

Saints + Scripture

Simplex Edition | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!


Commentary: Wayback Machine.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Wednesday of the Twenty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time
The First Letter to the Corinthians, chapter twelve, verse thirty-one thru chapter thirteen, verse thirteen;
Psalm Thirty-three (R/. twelve), verses two & three, four & five, & twelve & twenty-two;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter seven, verses thirty-one thru thirty-five.

Commentary: Gospel reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel, Jesus observes that the people of his generation criticize him as "a friend of tax collectors and sinners."

Jesus came as God’s own self into our dysfunctional world. He came to bring the light of God’s presence and love to the far country of sin and death. Accordingly, he went to the poor, the disabled, the marginalized, the forgotten, those crippled by sin.

He came to bring the
ordo of God into a disordered world. He came as the keynote to tune up a cacophonous universe. And thus the proponents of disorder and the producers of the cacophony sought to destroy him.

The Church is the Mystical Body of Jesus, the living organism that makes present Christ’s mind and will in the world. It is his love made flesh throughout the ages, his hands and feet and eyes and heart. We are all, through Baptism, members of that Body. Our purpose is his purpose—to carry the nonviolent and forgiving love of God to a hungry world, to go to the darkest places, to the far country in quest of sinners; to be both judge (sign of contradiction) and bearer of salvation.
Video reflection by Jem Sullivan, Ph.D. (U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops): Daily Reflection.

Video reflection by Doctor John Bergsma (St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology): Daily Reflection.


Mass Readings—Memorial of Ss. Cornelius & Cyprian
The Second Letter to the Corinthians, chapter four, verses seven thru fifteen;
Psalm One Hundred Twenty-six (R/. five), verses one(b/c) & two(a/b), two(c/d) & three, four & five, & six;
The Gospel according to John, chapter seventeen, verses eleven(b) thru nineteen.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Have no enemies. Conquer hostility with the power of love. Cultivate a mentality & practice of nonviolence. Be open to the needy, the poor, the marginalized. May they be the specially invited guests at the table of your lives."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, r. 1978-2005; feast: 22 October)
Mother Teresa Quote o' the Day
"We are all called to live contemplative lives. Contemplation is not to be shut up in a dark place, but to allow Jesus to live His passion, love, & humility in us, praying with us, being with us, sanctifying us & others through us."
—St. Teresa of Calcutta, M.C. (1910-1997, feast: 5 September)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"[Christ] died in body through a love greater than anyone had known. [Mary] died in spirit through a love unlike any other since His."
—St. Bernard of Clairvaux, Doctor of the Church (1090-1153, feast: 20 August)

Commentary: I wish the good folks @ Word on Fire would propagate these prayer graphics according to a different schedule than they do. This lovely quote for the Memorial of Our Lady of Sorrows (15 September) was not available 'til after yesterday's "Saints + Scripture" post was published.

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day


Less Than Jake, "Bad Scene and a Basement Show" from Borders and Boundaries (Rude Boy Mike Papa Whiskey)

Skammentary:
"After all the bad endings and misunderstandings,
All of the late nights, last hopes, and lost time,
All that she left me was only a memory,
And all I can say is, She don't understand me…"

Tuesday, September 15, 2020

Saints + Scripture

Simplex Complex Edition | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

'Tis the Memorial of Our Lady of Sorrows (A.K.A. Our Lady of the Seven Dolours, of Compassion, etc.): Madonna-link ūna, Madonna-link duæ, Madonna-link tria, & Wikipedia-link.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Quoth Minute Meditations from the Popes:
O Lord, ease the pain of those who have lost children to drugs or violence. Console those whose children are rebelling & ungrateful. May they learn from Mary's trust, & share in her gentle love.
'Tis also the festival of Saints Emilas, Deacon, & Jeremiah, Martyrs (died 852), martyred in the reign of the Umayyad king Abd ar-Rahman II, two of the forty-eight Martyrs of Córdoba: Martyr-link Echo, Martyr-link Juliett, & Wikipedia-link (List); Wikipedia-link Córdoba.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Anton Maria Schwartz, Priest (1852-1929), founder of the Calasanzian Congregation (1889), formally the Pious Workers of Saint Joseph Calasanctius of the Mother of God: Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Pious Workers.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Pascual Penadés Jornet, Priest & Martyr (1894-1936), martyred by Spanish Communist "Republicans" (Rojos), one of the two hundred thirty-three Martyrs of València (A.K.A. Blessed José Aparicio Sanz & Two Hundred Thirty-two Companions): Martyr-link ūnus & Martyr-link duo; Wikipedia-link València.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Władysław Miegoń, Priest & Martyr (1892-1942), martyred in the reign of the Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler, one of the One Hundred Eight Blessed Polish Martyrs: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link (List, № 75); Martyrs-link Polska & Wikipedia-link Polska.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Paolo Manna, Priest, P.I.M.E. (1872-1952), Superior General of the Pontifical Institute for Foreign Missions (1924-1934, P.I.M.E.), founder of the Pontifical Missionary Union (1916, P.M.U.): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link P.I.M.E. & Wikipedia-link P.M.U.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Tuesday of the Twenty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time
The First Letter to the Corinthians, chapter twelve, verses twelve, thirteen, fourteen, & twenty-seven thru thirty-one(a);
Psalm One Hundred (R/. three), verses one(b) & two, three, four, & five;
The Gospel according to John, chapter nineteen, verses twenty-five, twenty-six, & twenty-seven;
or, the Gospel according to Luke, chapter three, verses thirty-three, thirty-four, & thirty-five.

Commentary: Gospel reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, we hear in today’s Gospel that, as he was dying on the cross, Jesus looked to his mother and the disciple whom he loved, and he said to Mary, “Woman, behold, your son,” and then to John, “Behold, your mother.”

We are told that “from that hour the disciple took her into his home.” This text supports an ancient tradition that the Apostle John would have taken Mary with him when he travelled to Ephesus in Asia Minor and that both ended their days in that city. Indeed, on the top of a high hill overlooking the Aegean Sea, just outside of Ephesus, there is a modest dwelling that tradition holds to be the house of Mary.

Immaculate Mary, the Mother of God, assumed body and soul into heaven, is not of merely historical or theoretical interest, nor is she simply a spiritual exemplar. Instead, as “Queen of all the saints” (another of her titles), Mary is an ongoing presence, an actor in the life of the Church.

In entrusting Mary to John, Jesus was, in a real sense, entrusting Mary to all those who would be friends of Jesus down through the ages.
Video reflection by Deacon Arthur L. Miller (U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops): Daily Reflection.


Mass Readings—Memorial of Our Lady of Sorrows
The Letter to the Hebrews, chapter five, verses seven, eight, & nine;
Psalm Thirty-one (R/. seventeen), verses two & three(a), three(c/d) & four, five & six, fifteen & sixteen, & twenty;
Sequence Stabat Mater;
The Gospel according to John, chapter nineteen, verses twenty-five, twenty-six, & twenty-seven;
or, the Gospel according to Luke, chapter three, verses thirty-three, thirty-four, & thirty-five.

Commentary: Wikipedia-link Stabat Mater.


Papal Quote o' the Day
"Mary not only leads us to the Mystery of the Cross like a teacher; she also participates in that Mystery. She suffers with Jesus & suffers with us. With Jesus she also confronts & defeats the powers of evil."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, r. 1978-2005; feast: 22 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"There are men who think that God is so great that He disdains to look down upon us, our doings & our fortunes. But He who did not find it beneath His Majesty to make us, does not think it beneath Him to observe & to visit us."
—St. John Henry Newman, Cong. Orat. (1801-1890, feast: 9 October)
Mother Teresa Quote o' the Day
"You can pray while you work. Work doesn't stop prayer & prayer doesn't stop work. It requires only that small raising of the mind to Him: I love You God, I trust You, I believe in You, I need You now. Small things like that. These are wonderful ways to pray & wonderful prayers."
—St. Teresa of Calcutta, M.C. (1910-1997, feast: 5 September)
Archbishop Sheen Quote o' the Day
"The Lord has His Sacrament. It's very much like marriage. The marriage act of husband & wife is a kind of sacrifice because the lover dies to himself & submits to the beloved. The beloved dies to herself & submits to the lover, & out of that mutual death there comes the ecstasy of love. That is the sacrifice. Do a husband & wife have a love that is only manifested in that sacrificial act? Are there not any courtesies of companionship which would even surpass in the quiet silence the ecstasy of two in one flesh? As Maeterlinck said: A friend is one in whose presence you can keep silence. As a matter of fact, their happiness, one with another, depends upon the deep consciousness that each one is a sacrament of the other. So our Lord has a Sacrament. He is really & truly present, Body & Blood, soul & divinity in the holy Eucharist. And if we know how to love, we become sensitive & responsive, & when we come into visit Him, He will talk to us. We take on His likeness; as Moses' face shone because He was with God. So, too, St. Paul tells us that we grow in splendor because we are in the presence of God. Moses' splendor grew as he returned again to the mountain; this splendor rises in us, because we return to Christ. We reflect, says Saint Paul, as in a mirror, the splendor of the Lord, & thus we are transfigured into His likeness, from splendor to splendor. That is what the Eucharist does"
—Ven. Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day

Bombskare, "Just Another One" from A Million Ways to Die (Rude Boy Mike Papa Whiskey)

Skammentary:
"You spill your history to me,
But that's not how it has to be,
Just 'cause it's been that way before
Does not suggest that it's for sure.

"And if in time I'm proven right,
And if I carry on the fight—

"And if I end the battle scarred,
Wear them proud and wear them hard,
'Cause I don't want to be…

"I don't want to be just another one,
I don't want to be just another one,
I don't want to be just another one,
Don't want to leave you think I'm just another one."

Monday, September 14, 2020

Bonus! Song o' the Day

The Mighty Mighty Bosstones, "The Impression That I Get" from Let's Face It (Rude Boy Mike Papa Whiskey)

Skammentary: Overhead today at the green grocer's.

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day

Dance Hall Crashers, "Shelley" (live) from The Live Record: Witless Banter and 25 Mildly Antagonistic Songs of Love (Rude Boy Mike Papa Whiskey)

Saints + Scripture: The Exaltation of the Holy Cross

Simplex Complex Edition | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

The Popish Plot
"Lessons from the Prophets & a Love Song"

'Tis the Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross: Holy Cross-link ūnus, Holy Cross-link duo, Holy Cross-link trēs, Wikipedia-link True Cross, & Wikipedia-link Feast.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Quoth Minutes Meditations from the Popes:
O Lord, grant me the courage to take up my cross & follow You. Make me understand that it is through the Cross that I learn how to die with You, so that I may also rise with You.
Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross
The Book of Numbers, chapter twenty-one, verses four(b) thru nine;
Psalm Seventy-eight (R/. cf. seven[b]), verses one(b/c) & two, thirty-four & thirty-five, thirty-six & thirty-seven, & thirty-eight;
The Letter to the Philippians, chapter two, verses six thru eleven;
The Gospel according to John, chapter three, verses thirteen thru seventeen.

Commentary: Gospel reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, Jesus is speaking to Nicodemus and he tells him, “God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him may not perish but may have eternal life.”

Why does the Son come? Is it because God is angry? Because God wants to lord it over us? Because God needs something? No, he comes purely out of love, out of God’s desire that we flourish: “For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but that the world might be saved through him.”

It is not in order to work out his anger issues that the Father sends the Son, but that the justice of the world might be restored. Jesus is the fulfillment of God’s salvific intent, displayed throughout the Old Testament. He wanted to bring the divine life even into the darkest places. He wanted to hunt us down.

The Father, in short, sent the Son all the way into time, history, and the human condition. But then the Father sent him further, into our sin and dysfunction, and finally all the way down into hatred, violence, rejection, and death itself.
Video reflection by Monsignor James Vlaun (U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops): Daily Reflection.

Video reflection by Curtis Mitch (St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology): Daily Reflection.



'Tis also the festival of Saint Crescentius of Rome, Martyr (circa 292-303), martyred in the reign of the Roman emperors Diocletian & Maximian, a victim of the Great Persecution (303-313): Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Persecutions-link & Wikipedia-link Great Persecution.

Commentary: Son of St. Euthymius of Rome [?].

'Tis also the festival of Saint Cormac of Cashel, Bishop (836-908, A.K.A. Cormac mac Cuilennáin), King of Munster (902-908), inaugural Bishop of Cashel, author of the Sanas Cormaic & the lost Psalter of Cashel: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Cashel & Wikipedia-link Sanas Cormaic.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Pierre of Tarentaise, Bishop & Abbot, O.Cist. (1102-1174), Archbishop of Tarentaise (1141-1174), inaugural abbot of Tamié Abbey (1132-1141): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Tarentaise & Wikipedia-link Tamié.

Commentary: Not to be confused with Pope Bl. Innocent V (22 June, A.K.A. Pierre of Tarentaise).

'Tis also the festival of Saint Notburga of Rattenburg (circa 1265-1313; A.K.A. of Tyrol, of Eben): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Louis Gabriel Taurin Dufresse, Bishop & Martyr, M.E.P. (1750-1815, A.K.A. Jean-Gabriel-Taurin Dufresse), Vicar Apostolic of Sichuan (1801-1815), martyred in the reign of the Chinese Qing dynasty's Jiaqing Emperor, one of the one hundred twenty Martyr Saints of China (A.K.A. St. Augustine Zhao Rong & His One Hundred Nineteen Companions): Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Sichuan & Wikipedia-link Chengdu, & Wikipedia-link China.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"On this day when Catholics around the world celebrate the Triumph of the Cross, the Church invites us to look again at the meaning of Christian discipleship. She invites us to understand the sacrifices it involves & place all our hope in our Crucified & Risen Savior."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, r. 1978-2005; feast: 22 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Do not be so given to the activity of Martha as to forget the silence of Mary. May the Virgin who so well reconciled the one with the other be your sweet model & inspiration."
—St. Pius of Pietrelcina, O.F.M. Cap. (1887-1968, feast: 23 September)
Mother Teresa Quote o' the Day
"If you find serenity & happiness, they may be jealous of you: Be happy anyway."
—St. Teresa of Calcutta, M.C. (1910-1997, feast: 5 September)

Sunday, September 13, 2020

The Explorers' Club, № DCCLXXI

Operation AXIOM: After the World War—The Fiume Endeavor, Part II
8 September 1920: The Charter of Carnaro—After rejecting a modus vivendi proposed by the Italian government, Gabriele D'Annunzio declared the Italian Regency of Carnaro & unveiled the Carta del Carnaro, a new constitution that titled D'Annunzio as Comandante & set up a corporatist, syndicalist state, mandating the population into ten guilds; the Regency presaged much of Mussolini's Fascism.






Lest we forget.