Saturday, February 22, 2020

The Rebel Black Dot! Exodus 90 Song o' the Day!


The Aquabats!, "Cat with 2 Heads!" (live!) from The Fury of the Aquabats! Live at the Fonda! (St. Captain Thumbs Up!)

Commentary!: Yesterday, after months of discerning whether the time was right to get a new cat—if enough time had passed since Diva's death—my parents brought home not a cat, but two cats, a brother & sister named Scrapper & Autumn. This is splendid news & I look forward to getting to know both Autumn & Scrapper, but I've not yet seen either cat. So far, there are only rumors of cats.

Friday, February 21, 2020

Bonus! Exodus 90 Song o' Today

Freitag, 21. Februar
They Might Be Giants, "Escape from the Planet of the Apes" (live) from Severe Tire Damage (St. Mike Papa Whiskey)

Commentary: Fraternity is one of the pillars of Exodus 90. Last year, we went bowling. When my fraternity discussed options of a fraternal activity, I suggested axe throwing; another brother suggested an escape room game. This evening, my fraternity played an escape room game. I look forward to the next time I go axe throwing; I'll never again play an escape room game.

The Rebel Black Dot Exodus 90 Song o' Today

Freitag, 21. Februar
The Fratellis, "Jesus Stole My Baby" from Here We Stand (St. Mike Papa Whiskey)

Commentary: "Jesus Stole My Baby" chronicles the protagonist's lament at his girlflesh's conversion to Christianity. Of course, as the detestable lyrics make clear, he only appreciates his girlflesh for her flesh, as a sexual plaything—not even a playmate, just a plaything. 'Tis a genuinely disgusting song. Why is such a genuinely disgusting song the R.B.D.S.O.T.D.? I woke up with "Jesus Stole My Baby" running through my brain & I long-ago learned to trust the muse. I do not claim to understand the mysterious mechanism of the muse's inspiration (the Holy Ghost directly? my guardian angel as a mouthpiece?), but I know that the system works.

Why "Jesus Stole My Baby"? Probably because this afternoon I was smitten with the stunning beauty sent to inspect & reactivate the fire suppression system in the K. of C. fish fry trailer. Those blue eyes! That red hair! Those freckles! I was slack-jawed. "Jesus Stole My Baby" was a timely reminder not to objectify her, not to let sinful lust jam a foot in the door leading to my heart.

The Rebel Black Dot Exodus 90 Song o' Yesterday

Donnerstag, 20 Februar
Public Service Broadcasting, "The Race for Space" from The Race for Space (Space Cadet St. Mike Papa Whiskey)

Commentary: "The Race for Space" features an extended excerpt from President John Kennedy's "Address at Rice University on the Nation's Space Effort," commonly known as the "We choose to go to the Moon" speech. The speech was given seven months after John Glenn's mission aboard the Friendship 7.

Saints + Scripture

Simplex Complex Edition | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

'Tis the Optional Memorial of Saint Peter Damian, Bishop & Doctor of the Church, O.S.B. (circa 988-1072), Bishop of Ostia (1057-1067) & Bishop of Gubbio (1060-1066); prior of Fonte Avellana (1043-1072), formally the Verenable Hermitage of the Holy Cross; author of the Liber Gomorrhianus ("Book of Gomorrah"), a treatise against the clerical abuses of the day: Doctor-link ūnus, Doctor-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Doctors-link & Wikipedia-link Doctors; Wikipedia-link Ostia & Wikipedia-link Gubbio; Wikipedia-link Fonte Avellana; & Wikipedia-link Liber Gomorrhianus.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
He gave up his secular calling &, avoiding the compromised luxury of Cluniac monasteries, entered the isolated hermitage of Fonte Avellana, near Gubbio. Both as novice & as monk, his fervor was remarkable but led him to such extremes of self-mortification in penance that his health was affected, & he developed severe insomnia. On his recovery, he was appointed to lecture to his fellow monks. A zealot for monastic & clerical reform, he introduced a more-severe discipline, including the practice of flagellation ("the disciplina") into the house, which, under his rule, quickly attained celebrity, & became a model for other foundations, even the great abbey of Monte Cassino.
'Tis also the festival of Blessed Pepin of Landen (circa 575-646, also spelt Pippin, etc.; A.K.A. the Elder, the Old), Mayor of the Palace of Austrasia, Duke of Brabant: Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Husband of St. Itta of Metz, O.S.B. [8 May]; father of Ss. Begga, O.S.B. [17 December]; Bavo of Ghent [1 October]; & Gertrude of Nivelles, O.S.B. [17 March]; & ancestor of Bl. Charlemagne [28 January].

'Tis also the festival of Saint Germanus of Granfelden, Priest & Martyr (circa 612-677), first (I) abbot of Moutier-Grandval Abbey (640-677), martyred by order of the Alsatian duke Adalrich: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Moutier-Grandval.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Thomas Pormont, Priest & Martyr (circa 1559-1592, A.K.A. Thomas Whitgift), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I, one of the Eighty-five Martyrs of England & Wales: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link England & Wales & Wikipedia-link England & Wales.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Robert Southwell, Priest & Martyr, S.J. (circa 1561-1595), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I, one of the Forty Martyrs of England & Wales: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link England & Wales & Wikipedia-link England & Wales.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Noël Pinot, Priest & Martyr (1747-1794, A.K.A. Natale Pinot), martyred in the reign of the French National Convention for refusing an oath to the Civil Constitution of the Clergy: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Civil Constitution of the Clergy.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Friday of the Sixth Week in Ordinary Time
The Letter of James, chapter two, verses fourteen thru twenty-four & twenty-six;
Psalm One Hundred Twelve (R/. one[b]), verses one & two, three & four, & five & six;
The Gospel according to Mark, chapter eight, verse thirty-four thru chapter nine, verse one.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel Jesus lays down the conditions of discipleship.

A few verses before our reading Jesus predicted his Passion for the first time. He will sacrifice himself in love for the other—and in this, he will come to deeper life and become a source of life to others. Ronald Knox talked about the sign of the cross this way: the first two gestures form the letter "I," and the next two cross it out. That’s what the cross of Jesus meant and means.

In this scene, he gathered the crowd with his disciples and pronounced the formula for following him. We ought to be listening too with great attention: "Whoever wishes to come after me must deny himself, take up his cross, and follow me." The path of discipleship is the path of self-sacrificing love, and that means the path of suffering.

Then the great paradox: "For whoever wishes to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake and that of the Gospel will save it." Put that over your door, on the refrigerator, on your screensaver. There is no better one-line guide to the happy life.
Video reflection by Alejandro Orbezo-Elizaga (U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops): Daily Reflection.


Mass Readings—Optional Memorial of St. Peter Damian
The Second Letter to Timothy, chapter four, verses one thru five;
Psalm Sixteen (R/. five[a]), verses one, two, & five; seven & eight; & eleven;
The Gospel according to John, chapter fifteen, verses one thru eight.

Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 40
The Book of Exodus, chapter sixteen, verses four thru twenty-one.

Commentary: (Exodus, 16:4-21).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Christ's love for us: behold the Eucharist! Love that gives itself, love that remains, love that communicates itself, love that multiplies itself, love that sacrifices itself. The Eucharist is the love that unites us & the love that saves us."
—Pope St. Paul VI (1897-1978, r. 1963-1978; feast: 29 May)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Tell everybody that God grants us graces through the Immaculate Heart of Mary; that people are to ask her for them; & that the Heart of Jesus wants the Immaculate Heart of Mary to be venerated at His side."
—St. Jacinta Marto (1910-1920, feast: 20 February)

Thursday, February 20, 2020

The Explorers' Club, № DCCXXXIII

Operation AXIOM: The Space Race—The 58th Anniversary of Mercury 6
20 February 1962: Aboard the Mercury capsule Friendship 7, John Glenn (1921-2016), U.S.M.C., became the third American in space &, famously, the first American to orbit the Earth, completing three orbits; a warning light before re-entry was later found to be the result of a faulty sensor; after splashdown & recovery, Glenn embarked on a global publicity tour nicknamed the "Fourth Orbit."






Commentary: In the far-famed words of Scott Carpenter, Mercury-Atlas 6 capsule communicator (CAPCOM) & Mercury-Atlas 7 astronaut, "Godspeed, John Glenn."

I made a mess of commemorating the Apollo Program, not recalling, 'til I commemorated the fiftieth anniversary of Apollo 11 that I'd failed to commemorate the gold anniversaries of Apollo 7, Apollo 8, Apollo 9, & Apollo 10. I've subsequently marked the fifty-first anniversary of Apollo 8 & plan to catch each Apollo mission as it comes around, fiftieth, fifty-first, fifty-second, whatever. I am undecided what to do about the Mercury & Gemini programs. Ought I mark those dates as they come up, even if they aren't on a "round number" anniversary, as I'm doing today with the fifty-eighth anniversary of John Glenn &
Friendship 7 (Mercury 6)? Or ought I wait &, heaven permitting, mark the sixtieth (diamond) anniversaries in 2021-2026? I've made my choice for today, but consistency has never been my strong suit.

Saints + Scripture

The Popish Plot
"Fish Fry"

'Tis the festival of Saint Olcán of Derken, Bishop (died circa 480, also spelt Bolcan), Bishop of Armoy (474-480): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Armoy.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Leo of Catania, Bishop, O.S.B. (703-789, A.K.A. the Thaumaturgus ["Wonder-worker"]), fifteenth (XV) Bishop of Catania (778-789), who opposed the first bout of the Byzantine Iconoclastic heresy: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Catania, & Heresy-link & Wikipedia-link Iconoclasm.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Wulfric of Haselbury, Priest & Hermit (circa 1080-1154, also spelt Ulfrick, etc.): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Amata of Assisi, Religious, O.S.C. (died circa 1250): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Niece of St. Clare of Assisi [11 August], foundress of the Poor Clares (O.S.C.).

'Tis also the festival of Saints Francisco Marto & Jacinta Marto (1908-1919 & 1910-1920), two of the three visionaries to whom were revealed the apparitions of Our Lady of Fátima (13 May-13 October 1917): Saints-link, Saint-link Foxtrot, Saint-link Juliett & Wikipedia-link; Madonna-link & Wikipedia-link Fátima.


'Tis also the festival of Blessed Maria Julia Rodzińska, Religious & Martyr, O.P. (1899-1945, A.K.A. Stanislawa Rodzińska), martyred in the reign of the Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler, one of the One Hundred Eight Blessed Polish Martyrs: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link (List, № 3); Martyrs-link Polska & Wikipedia-link Polska.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Thursday of the Sixth Week in Ordinary Time
The Letter of James, chapter two, verses one thru nine;
Psalm Thirty-four (R/. seven[a]), verses two & three, four & five, & six & seven;
The Gospel according to Mark, chapter eight, verses twenty-seven thru thirty-three.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel Jesus asks his disciples, "Who do people say that I am?"

No other religious figure or founder would ask such a question. This is the primordial and peculiar question of the Christian faith. It has to do with him and who he is. And so the Church, for the first several centuries, fought intellectually over precisely this odd question.

The first group that "responds" is the general public, giving a range of opinion—and all of it wrong. And if we were to take a public opinion poll today, we would hear "teacher, prophet, guru, madman…"

Then that devastating question: "But who do you say that I am?" You who are closest to me, surely you have a clearer grasp than the common run of people. But the disciples don’t speak. Are they afraid? Perhaps. Are they ignorant? Probably.

Finally, Simon Peter speaks: "You are the Messiah." In Matthew’s version of the scene, Peter says, "You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God." This is the mystical faith that stands at the heart of Christianity. To hold this Petrine faith is to be a Christian; to deny it is not to be a Christian
Video reflection by Father Don Miller, O.F.M. (U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops): Daily Reflection.


Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 39
The Book of Exodus, chapter sixteen, verses one, two, & three.

Commentary: Manna from Heaven (Exodus, 16:1-3).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"In a world that often reduces sex to the pursuit of pleasure, & in some cases to domination, the Church has a special mission. She is to place sex in the context of conjugal love & of generous & responsible openness to parenthood."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, r. 1978-2005; feast: 22 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Thirty or forty years ago it was easy to be a Christian. The very air we breathed was Christian. Bicycles could be left on front lawns; doors could be left unlocked. Suddenly all this has changed; now we have to affirm our faith. We live in a world that challenges us. And many fall away. Dead bodies float downstream; it takes live bodies to resist the current. And this is our summons. We will have to begin to be a different church. We are for a moment on the trapeze. We are in between the death of an old civilization and culture and the swing to the beginning of the new. These are the times in which we live. They are therefore wonderful days, marvelous, we should thank God that we live in times like this."
—Ven. Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)

Wednesday, February 19, 2020

The Queue

I had not even finished one Post-Synodal Apostolic Exhortation, Christus Vivit!, when His Holiness Pope Francis published another Post-Synodal Apostolic Exhortation, Querida Amazonia, last week. He needs to slow down or I need to speed up, or both. I'm not going to dive into Querida Amazonia ("Beloved Amazon") before the summer at the earliest.

Who Wrote the Bible? was lent me by my buddy Santa Claus, a fellow possessed of some, shall me say, unorthodox ideas—not full-blown heterodox, but unorthodox—so, I cannot help but regard the book with some suspicion. He refers to it frequently as "my Bible book," as opposed to his other frequent mention, "my Jesuit book," & I once remarked that I might like to read it one day; a fortnight hence, he presented it to me to read. Out of courtesy, it has climb the queue. I have more reliably orthodox books about the Bible, including Jimmy Akin's The Bible Is a Catholic Book, in the "Eventually" tranche &, depending on how orthodox or unorthodox Who Wrote the Bible? proves, The Bible Is a Catholic Book might rocket to the "Presently" tranche, or even to "Currently."

This very evening, another parishioner mentioned Thomas Merton's The Seven Storey Mountain &, unbidden, said he'd lend me the book once he's finished. Bishop Barron speaks highly of Merton; so, I'm more than willing to read The Seven Storey Mountain. Given my druthers, I'd be left to chip away at the queue as it already stands, but the world is altogether more dynamic than that.

Recently
Christopher Carstens, A Devotional Journey into the Mass: How Mass Can Become a Time of Grace, Nourishment, and Devotion
Matthew Kelly, Rediscover the Saints: Twenty-five Questions That Will Change Your Life
Pope Francis, Apostolic Exhortation Christus Vivit! (Christ Is Alive!)

Currently
Richard Elliott Friedman, Who Wrote the Bible?

Presently
Flannery O'Connor, Flannery O'Connor Collection (Word on Fire Classics)
Fulton J. Sheen, Life of Christ (Word on Fire Classics)
Dom Jean-Baptiste Chautard, Spiritual Handbook for Catholic Evangelists: How to Win Souls without Losing Your Own

Saints + Scripture

'Tis the festival of Saint Odran, Martyr (died circa 452), martyred defending Saint Patrick [17 March], whom he served as charioteer, from pagans: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Boniface of Brussels, Bishop, O.Cist. (1183-1260, A.K.A. of Lausanne), Bishop of Lausanne (1231-1239), a father of the First Council of Lyon (1245, the thirteenth [XIII] ecumenical council): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Lausanne & Wikipedia-link Lyon.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Conrad of Piacenza, Hermit, T.O.S.F. (circa 1284-1351; A.K.A. Corrado Confalonieri, of Noto): Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Álvaro of Córdoba, Priest, O.P. (circa 1350-1430, also spelt Alvarez, Albaro): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Elisabetta of Mantua, O.S.M. (1428-1468, A.K.A. Elisabetta Batholomea Picenardi): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed John Sullivan, Priest, S.J. (1861-1933): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Wednesday of the Sixth Week in Ordinary Time
The Letter of James, chapter one, verses nineteen thru twenty-seven;
Psalm Fifteen (R/. one[b]), verses two & three(a), three(b/c) & four(a/b), & five;
The Gospel according to Mark, chapter eight, verses twenty-two thru twenty-six.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, after Jesus heals the blind man in today’s Gospel, he tells him, "Do not even go into the village."

Now, blindness is a biblical image for lack of spiritual sight, the inability to see things as they are. One of the effects of the fall was a loss of holiness—seeing with the eyes of Christ, appreciating the world as a participation in the creative energy of God. All of us sinners, to varying degrees, are blind to this metaphysics of creation and tend to see the world from the standpoint of the self-elevating ego.

One of the origins of this spiritual debility is too much time in the village. Jesus the healer and judge has to lead us blind people out of the city and give us sight—and then strictly enjoin us not to return to the blinding ways of the village.

We unfortunate village dwellers must, through the power of Christ, put on the mind of Christ. And then we must live in a new town, the community of love and justice that is the Church. It is this city of vision that effectively challenges (and judges) the enduring power of the blinding society.
Video reflection by Jem Sullivan, Ph.D. (U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops): Daily Reflection.


Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 38
The Book of Exodus, chapter fifteen, verses twenty-two thru twenty-seven.

Commentary: Bitter Water Is Made Sweet (Exodus, 15:22-27).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"There is a higher wisdom: a wisdom that reveals the true meaning of our human weakness & our pain. That wisdom is revealed in Christ. He knows what it is to suffer; He experienced it on the road to Calvary."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, r. 1978-2005; feast: 22 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"At the [Second] Vatican Council, there was the discussion about the world. I remember one of the bishops from Belgium arose & made the proper distinction between the two uses of the word 'world' in scripture. The word 'world' can mean the theater of the redemption, & in that sense it is good: 'God so loved the world.' But the world also means a spirit, an organization without God. So our Lord said, 'I have taken you out of the world. Therefore the world will hate you.' 'I pray not for the world,' He said. But there was a confusion. And the result is that today we have lost many of our faithful & our priests & our sisters, not because of Christological heresy, nor because of persecution. The Lord has been very good to us; the only test He gave us was: 'Will you become secular, will you leave?"
—Ven. Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)
Catholic Quote o' the Day
"Jesus often expressed deep emotion, compassion, sorrow, frustration, & even righteous anger. So we should never be afraid to reveal our true feelings to Him. He understands human emotions, because He experienced them."
—Matthew Arnold (fl. 2020)

Operation ÖSTERREICH: Exodus 90, Day 38

Weekly Wednesday Weigh-in
Last weigh-in: 342.6 lbs
This weigh-in: 344.8 lbs.
Difference: +2.2 lbs.

I gained as much weight in the last week—two & one-fifth pounds (2.2 lbs.)—as I lost in the week before—two & one-fifth pounds (2.2 lbs.). I freely admit my frustration: I'm disgruntled, discouraged, & demoralized. But that's more than enough whining. Back to the grindstone.


Bonus! Lied von ÖSTERREICH
Jim Gaffigan, "Box of Donuts" from Cinco (Mike Papa Waffle)

The Rebel Black Dot Exodus 90 Song o' the Day


The Mighty Mighty Bosstones, "Bronzing the Garbage" from Question the Answers (Rude Boy St. Mike Papa Whiskey)

Tuesday, February 18, 2020

The Rebel Black Dot Exodus 90 Song o' Today


Dienstag, 18. Februar
The Interrupters, "The Prosecutor" from Say It Out Loud (Rude Boy St. Mike Papa Whiskey)

The Rebel Black Dot Exodus 90 Song o' Yesterday

Montag, 17. Februar
Magic!, "One Woman One Man" from Don't Kill the Magic! (St. Mike Papa Whiskey)

Commentary:
"I am a loser,
I only confuse her,
She is the same no matter where go,
Tradition in her veins, passed down,
The way I live is foreign to her now,
Oh, I wish it wasn't so!
(Lord, I wish it wasn't so!)

"I know that she cries
By the red in her eyes,
She's been waiting for signs that never come,
All she every really wanted was—

"One woman, one man,
That's all that she asks,
No other demands,
One woman, one man…"

Bonus! Exodus 90 Song o' Sunday

Sonntag, 16. Februar
Dashboard Confessional, "Screaming Infidelities" via the YouTubes (St. Mike Papa Whiskey)

Commentary: For no reason I've been able to identify, on Sunday I couldn't get the end of "Screaming Infidelities" out of my head.
"Your hair, it's everywhere,
Screaming infidelities
And taking it to wear…"
Music Video-link.

Saints + Scripture

Simplex Complex Edition | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

The Popish Plot
"Announcing… The Popish Plotcast"

'Tis the festival of Saint Simeon of Jerusalem, Bishop & Martyr (died circa 107), second (II) Bishop of Jerusalem (62-107), martyred in the reign of the Roman emperor Trajan: Martyr-link ūnus, Martyr-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Diocese-link Jerusalem & Wikipedia-link Jerusalem; & Persecutions-link & Wikipedia-link Persecution.

Commentary: Wayback Machine. Son of St. Cleopas [25 September].

'Tis also the festival of Saint Colmán of Lindisfarne, Bishop & Abbot (circa 605-676), third (III) Bishop of Lindisfarne (661-664), founding abbot of the School of Mayo (668-670): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Holy Island, Wikipedia-link Bishop-Abbots, & Wikipedia-link Mayo.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Giovanni of Fiesole, Religious, O.P. (circa 1387-1455, the famous "Fra Angelico" [the "Angelic friar"]; Anglicized as John; A.K.A. Guido di Pietro): Blessed-link ūnus, Blessed-link duo, & Wikipedia-link.


'Tis also the festival of Blessed William Harrington, Priest & Martyr, S.J. (1566-1594), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I, one of the one hundred sixty Martyrs of Douai: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link Douai & Wikipedia-link Douai.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed John Pibush, Priest & Martyr (died 1601), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I, one of the one hundred sixty Martyrs of Douai: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link Douai & Wikipedia-link Douai.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Tuesday of the Sixth Week in Ordinary Time
The Letter of James, chapter one, verses twelve thru eighteen;
Psalm Ninety-four (R/. twelve[a]), verses twelve & thirteen(a), fourteen & fifteen, & eighteen & nineteen;
The Gospel according to Mark, chapter eight, verses fourteen thru twenty-one.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel Jesus warns his disciples against the leaven of the Pharisees and of Herod. Conversely, he wanted them to be the leaven that would transform their culture.

The Second Vatican Council spoke of the universal call to holiness—the summons of all the baptized to be a transforming leaven in the wider society. The Vatican II fathers wanted to inspire a generation of great Catholic professionals in the hopes that such people would carry the holiness they learned in the Church out to their areas of specialization in the secular world.

The Church manifests the way of ordering things born of love—love for God and love for neighbor. Generosity, peace, nonviolence, and trust will give rise to a new way of ordering things. This is true of a family, a school, a parish, a community, a nation-state.

Now, how in the world does one get this project off the ground? As should be clear to even the most naïve person, this never happens all at once, overnight. Rather, in small ways, people begin living according to the Lord’s ways. And then, in God’s time, this new community begins to have a leavening effect on the wider society.
Video reflection by Fr. James Vacco, O.F.M. (U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops): Daily Reflection.


Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 37
The Book of Exodus, chapter fifteen, verses one thru twenty-one.

Commentary: The Songs of Moses & Miriam (Exodus, 15:1-21).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Only those persons who recognize that they are sinners, in need of salvation because they cannot save themselves, only then can they extend their hands to Jesus as to their Savior."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, r. 1978-2005; feast: 22 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"In other parts of the world, our brothers in Christ are suffering for their faith. And here we are at ease, just undergoing a slight test & dividing our loyalty between Christ & the world. We must realize in minds & hearts that this is a new age, that we will have to be a creative minority, & that the only argument that is left to convince others is holiness. The world has heard every other argument, & it is ready to reject them all, all except one: holiness."
—Ven. Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)
Catholic Quote o' the Day
"The miracles of Jesus need no defense. Even His enemies found they could not deny or explain them away. They are an essential part of the Gospel. To ignore or downplay the miracles of Jesus is to rob the Gospel of its unique power."
—Matthew Arnold (fl. 2020)

Monday, February 17, 2020

Saints + Scripture

'Tis the Optional Memorial of the Seven Holy Founders of the Servite Order (fl. 1233), formally the Order of Servants of the Blessed Virgin Mary (1233, O.S.M.): Saints-link ūnus, Saints-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link O.S.M.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
In 1240, seven nobleman of Florence mutually decided to withdraw from the city to a solitary place for prayer & direct service of God. Their initial difficulty was providing for their dependents, since two were still married & two were widowers. Their aim was to lead a life of penance & prayer, but they soon found themselves disturbed by constant visitors from Florence. They next withdrew to the deserted slopes of Monte Senario.
Quoth
Minute Meditations from the Popes:
O Lord, the seven founders of the Servites followed the example of Mary Your Mother in serving God's People. Help me to learn that same generosity & live it everyday of my life.
'Tis also the festival of Saint Lommán of Trim, Bishop (died circa 450; also spelt Lonan, Luman, etc.; A.K.A. Lommán mac Dalláin), Bishop of Trim: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Nephew of St. Patrick [17 March].

'Tis also the festival of Saint Fortchern of Trim, Bishop (fifth century, also spelt Foirtchernn), Bishop of Trim: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Silvin of Auchy, Bishop, O.S.B. (circa 650-718, A.K.A. of Thérouanne), Biashop of Toulouse: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Toulouse.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Evermode of Ratzeburg, Bishop & Abbot, O. Præm. (circa 1100-1178, also spelt Evermod), Bishop of Ratzeburg (1154-1178), abbot of abbeys at Magdeburg (1138-1154) & Gottesgnaden (1134-1138): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Ratzeburg.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Luke Belludi, Religious, O.F.M. (circa 1200-1285): Blessed-link ūnus, Blessed-link duo, & Wikipedia-link (List, by date of death).

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Monday of the Sixth Week in Ordinary Time
The Letter of James, chapter one, verses one thru eleven;
Psalm One Hundred Nineteen (R/. seventy-seven[a]), verses sixty-seven, sixty-eight, seventy-one, seventy-two, seventy-five, & seventy-six;
The Gospel according to Mark, chapter eight, verses eleven, twelve, & thirteen.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel the Pharisees ask Jesus for a sign from heaven. They are testing him because they have no faith nor trust in him.

Faith is an attitude of trust in the presence of God. Faith is openness to what God will reveal, do, and invite. It should be obvious that in dealing with the infinite, all-powerful person who is God, we are never in control.

This is why we say that faith goes beyond reason. If we can figure it out, calculate precisely, predict with complete accuracy, we’re in charge—and by definition, we are not dealing with a person. Would you use any of those descriptors in talking about your relationship with your husband, wife, or best friend? Instead, you enter into an ever-increasing rapport of trust with such people.

One of the most fundamental statements of faith is this: your life is not about you. You’re not in control. This is not your project. Rather, you are part of God’s great design. To believe this in your bones and to act accordingly is to have faith.
Video reflection by Monsignor James Vlaun (U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops): Daily Reflection.


Mass Readings—Optional Memorial of the Seven Holy Founders of the Servite Order
The Letter to the Romans, chapter eight, verses twenty-six thru thirty;
Psalm Thirty-four (R/. two; or, nine), verses two & three, four & five, six & seven, eight & nine, & ten & eleven;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter nineteen, verses twenty-seven, twenty-eight, & twenty-nine.

Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 36
The Book of Exodus, chapter fourteen, verses twenty-one thru thirty-one.

Commentary: The Crossing of the Red Sea (concluded; Exodus, 14:21-25) & the Egyptians Drown in the Sea (Exodus, 14:26-31).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Mary is the clearest & surest sign that God always comes to us with His love. She sings with all her being that whatever we receive from God is grace. The Virgin is our true teacher in the journey of faith."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, r. 1978-2005; feast: 22 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"When we're young, we think we're doing well. When we get older, we're sure we're not. Hence, when the adulteress was before our Lord, the woman whom the people wanted to stone, who left first, as Jesus wrote in the sand the sins of those who were there? The eldest: 'they began to leave, beginning with the eldest.' As we grow older, we know that we have done little service. I've been a priest for fifty-five years, for which I thank God I was doing much better thirty years ago in my own mind than I am now. Now I feel as if I have done so little."
—Ven. Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)
Catholic Quote o' the Day
"The secret to sanctity & happiness rests in our fidelity to the duty of the present moment."
—Father Jean Pierre de Caussaude, S.J. (1675-1751)

Saturday, February 15, 2020

The Rebel Black Dot Exodus 90 Song o' Today

Samstag, 15. Februar
Fastball, "Out of My Head" from All the Pain Money Can Buy (St. Mike Papa Whiskey)

Commentary:
"Was I out of my head, was I out of my mind?
How could I have ever been so blind?
I was waiting for an indication,
It was hard to find.

"Don't matter what I say, only what I do,
I never mean to do bad things to you,
So quiet, but I finally woke up,
If you're sad, then it's time you spoke up, too…"

The Rebel Black Dot Exodus 90 Song o' Thursday

Donnerstag, 13. Februar
Fountains of Wayne, "Can't Get It Out of My Head" (live) from Out-of-State Plates (St. Mike Papa Whiskey)

Commentary:
"…And I can't get it out of my head,
No, I can't get it out of my head,
Now my whole world has gone for dead
'Cause I can't get it out of my head…"

Saints + Scripture

Better Late than Never | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

'Tis the festival of Saint Onesimus, Bishop (died circa 95), second (II) Bishop of Ephesus, the principal subject of the Letter to Philemon: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Ephesus & Wikipedia-link Epistle to Philemon.

Commentary: Wayback Machine. The letter to St. Philemon [22 November] was written by St. Paul the Apostle [25 January, 29 June].

'Tis also the festival of Saints Faustinus, Priest, & Jovinus, Deacon, Martyrs (died 120, A.K.A. Jovita), martyred in the reign of the Roman emperor Hadrian: Martyr-link Foxtrot, Martyr-link Juliett, & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Berach of Cluain Coirpthe, Abbot & Martyr (died 595; also spelt Barachias, Barry; A.K.A. of Termonbarry, of Kilbarry), founding abbot of an abbey at Termonbarry (Tearmann Bearaigh, "St. Barry's sanctuary"): Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Termonbarry.

Commentary: Nephew of St. Freoch [?] & brother of St. Midabaria [22 February].

'Tis also the festival of Saints Sunaman, Deacon; Unaman, Priest; & Winaman, Subdeacon; Martyrs, O.S.B. (died circa 1040), martyred by pagan Swedes in the reign of the good king Anund Jakob: Martyr-link Sierra, Martyr-link Uniform, Martyr-link Whiskey, & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Nephews of St. Sigfrid of Sweden [15 February]; see: below.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Sigfrid of Sweden, Bishop, O.S.B. (died circa 1045, the "Apostle of Sweden;" also spelt Siegfried, Sigurd, etc.; A.K.A. of Växjö, of Wexlow): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Claude de la Colombière, Priest, S.J. (1641-1682), promoter of devotion to the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus & foe of the Jansenist heresy; imprisoned (ruinous to his health) & banished from England, a victim of the perjurer Titus Oates's "Popish Plot" hoax: Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Sacred Heart-link & Wikipedia-link Sacred Heart; Heresy-link & Wikipedia-link Jansenism; & Popish Plot-link & Wikipedia-link Popish Plot.


'Tis also the festival of Blessed Michał Sopoćko, Priest (1888-1975), founder of the Congregation of Sisters of Merciful Jesus, promoter of devotion to the Divine Mercy: Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Divine Mercy.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Saturday of the Fifth Week in Ordinary Time
The First Book of Kings, chapter twelve, verses twenty-six thru thirty-two & chapter thirteen, verses thirty-three & thirty-four;
Psalm One Hundred Six (R/. four[a]), verses six & seven(a/b), nineteen & twenty, & twenty-one & twenty-two;
The Gospel according to Mark, chapter eight, verses one thru ten.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel Jesus feeds the crowd of four thousand, which is a wonderful biblical illustration of what I have often called the loop of grace.

The constant command of the Bible is this: what you have received as a gift, give as a gift—and you will find the original gift multiplied and enhanced. God’s grace, precisely because it is grace, cannot be held on to; rather, it is had only in the measure that it remains grace—that is to say, a gift given away. God’s life, in a word, is had only on the fly. One realizes this truth when one enters willingly into the loop of grace, giving away that which one is receiving.

At the outset of the story, the disciples refuse to serve the crowd, preferring to send them away to the neighboring towns to fend for themselves. At the climax of the narrative, the disciples become themselves the instruments of nourishment, setting the loaves and fishes before the people. Within the loop of grace, they discover their mission and are themselves enhanced, transfigured.
Video reflection by Marc DelMonico, Ph.D. (U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops): Daily Reflection.


Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 34
The Book of Exodus, chapter thirteen, verse seventeen thru chapter fourteen, verse nine.

Commentary: The Pillar of Cloud & the Pillar of Fire (Exodus, 13:17-22) & Crossing the Red Sea (Exodus, 14:1-9).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"God created man in His own image & likeness: calling him to existence through love, He called him at the same time for love."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, r. 1978-2005; feast: 22 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Evil works in us. Love declines. And then we hesitate about changing. St. Thomas says we can hate truth & fear goodness. We can hate truth because it means a change. For that reason we often resent the truth that is told about ourselves. We rationalize what we have done. We will stay away from a doctor, lest he find cancer. We do not want to know the truth. We like to hear about social action & political-moral problems, but we’re not too keen on hearing the truth about ourselves. Truth hurts. We fear goodness because we like to keep our own standards. We have moved away from the standard of Christ to the standard of the world. We do not ask ourselves, 'Does this please Christ?' but 'Does this please the world? So I will dress & act in such a way that I will not be separate from the world; I want to be with it. We marry this age, & we become a widow in the next one. We take on its verbiage, its fashions. This is one reason for so much instability in the Church today: the sand on which we are walking is shifting. We’ve given up the rock which is Christ."
—Ven. Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)
Convert Quote o' the Day
"If you live like the world & you take sin, relationships, our Father, & His Church lightly, you’re saying that Jesus’ death on the cross was in vain. We are to become the new man, renewed in our minds & living in Christ."
—Steve Ray (fl. 2020)

Saints + Scripture — Please Stand By

Friday, February 14, 2020

Saints + Scripture

Better Late than Never | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

The Popish Plot
"Saints Cyril & Methodius"

'Tis the Memorial of Saints Cyril, Monk, & Methodius, Bishop ("Apostles to the Slavs;" circa 827-869, A.K.A. Constantine; & circa 815-885, A.K.A. Michael): Saints-link, Saint-link Charlie, Saint-link Mike, & Wikipedia-link.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
They are two brothers & Byzantine Christian theologians & missionaries. Because their father was an officer in a part of Greece inhabited by many Slavs, these two Greek brothers ultimately became missionaries, teachers, & patrons of the Slavic peoples. They are credited with devising the Glagolitic alphabet, the first alphabet used to transcribe Old Church Slavoic.
Wikipedia-link Glagolitic alphabet & Wikipedia-link Old Church Slavoic

Quoth
Minute Meditations from the Popes:
O Lord, Ss. Cyril & Methodius spent their lives to share the Word of God. Teach me to share that Word, especially with those who are living without hope.
'Tis also the festival of Saint Valentine, Bishop & Martyr (circa 226-269, of Rome, of Terni), martyred in the reign of the Roman emperor Claudius II Gothicus: Martyr-link Rome, Martyr-link Terni, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Saint Valentine's Day.


'Tis also the festival of Saint Abraham of Carrhae, Bishop & Hermit (circa 350-422; A.K.A. of Charres, of Cyrrhus, of Harran; also spelt Abraames), Bishop of Carrhae (modern Harran): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Auxentius of Bithynia, Hermit (circa 400-473), one of the fathers of the Council of Chalcedon (451, the fourth [IV] ecumenical council): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Council-link & Wikipedia-link Chalcedon.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Antoninus of Sorrento, Abbot, O.S.B. (circa 555-625, A.K.A. of Campagna), abbot of the monastery of San Agrippino: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Saint John Baptist of the Conception, Priest, O.SS.T. (1561-1613, A.K.A. Juan García López-Rico): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Vicente Vilar David, Martyr (1889-1937), martyred in the reign of the Communist president Manuel Azaña: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Friday of the Fifth Week in Ordinary Time
The First Book of Kings, chapter eleven, verses twenty-nine thru thirty-two & chapter twelve, verse nineteen;
Psalm Eighty-one (R/. eleven[a] & nine[a]), verses ten & eleven(a/b), twelve & thirteen, fourteen & fifteen;
The Gospel according to Mark, chapter seven, verses thirty-one thru thirty-seven.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel Jesus heals a deaf man who had a speech impediment.

Mark tells us that he took him "off by himself away from the crowd." Jesus then "put his finger into the man’s ears and, spitting, touched his tongue; then he looked up to heaven and groaned, and said to him,
'Ephphatha!' (that is, ‘Be opened!’)." Looking up to his Father and inserting his fingers into the man’s ears, Jesus establishes, as it were, an electrical current, literally plugging him into the divine energy, compelling him to hear the Word.

Now for the healing’s spiritual significance. The crowd is a large part of the problem. The raucous voices of so many, the insistent bray of the advertising culture, the confusing Babel of competing spiritualities—all of it makes us deaf to God’s word. And therefore, we have to be moved to a place of silence and communion.

Jesus draws us into his space, the space of the Church. There, away from the crowd, we can immerse ourselves in the rhythm of the liturgy, listen avidly to Scripture, study the theological tradition, watch the moves of holy people, take in the beauty of sacred art and architecture. There we can hear.
Video reflection by Gloria Zapiain (U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops): Daily Reflection.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Memorial of Ss. Cyril & Methodius
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter thirteen, verses forty-six thru forty-nine;
Psalm One Hundred Seventeen, verses one(b/c) & two
(R/. the Gospel according to Mark, chapter sixteen, verse fifteen; or, "Alleluia");
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter ten, verses one thru nine.

Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 33
The Book of Exodus, chapter thirteen, verses one thru sixteen.

Commentary: The Ordinance of the Passover (concluded; Exodus, 13:1-2), the Feast of Unleavened Bread (Exodus, 13:3-10), & the Consecration of the First-born Males (Exodus, 13:11-16).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"The person who has been evangelized goes on to evangelize others. It is unthinkable that people should accept the Word & give themselves to the Kingdom without becoming persons who bear witness to it & proclaim it in turn."
—Pope St. Paul VI (1897-1978, r. 1963-1978; feast: 29 May)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Samson, the strong man, fell in love with a woman named Delilah. And the lords of the Philistines went up to the country to see her & said, 'Coax him & find out what gives him his great strength, & how we can master him, bind him, & hold him captive.' And Delilah tried to find out what gave Samson strength, until finally he told her the secret.

"He said, 'If my head were shaved, then my strength would leave me & I should become as weak as any other man.' Delilah then told the Philistines. She lulled Samson to sleep on her knees & summoned a man, & he shaved the seven locks of Samson’s hair for her, & they made him captive. And Samson’s strength left him. But the strength was not in the hair, as is so often erroneously said. Samson had taken the Nazirite vow which committed him first to totally abstain from women & from strong wine. The growing of the hair was a symbol of that vow, so that the cutting of the hair was also the symbol of the breaking of the vow.

"And then Delilah cried, 'The Philistines are upon you, Samson.'

"He woke from his sleep & said, 'I will go out as usual & shake myself.' In other words, 'I’m as strong as I ever was.' He did not know that the Lord had left him. We’re not as strong as we were."
—Ven. Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)
Convert Quote o' the Day
"Do you ever feel lonely, unloved, unforgiven, or unworthy? Take a look at the cross. You are loved. Jesus would have done it if you were the only person, because He loves you enough to make the supreme sacrifice."
—Steve Ray (fl. 2020)

Saints + Scripture — Please Stand By

The R.B.D. Exodus 90 Song against Valentine's Day


The Mighty Mighty Bosstones, "Katie" from Medium Rare (Rude Boy St. Mike Papa Whiskey)

Skammentary:
"Nine times out of ten,
The times you'd pretend,
Katie, more times than not you're,
You're not my friend…

"The friendship was fictitious,
How could you be so malicious?
You haven't got a good excuse—

"You're just a waste of time to me, Katie,
And you're a waste of time and air and space,
And I've been wasting time on you, Katie,
There isn't any time left I can waste.

"Your masquerade,
It's pretty played,
Katie, it's quitting time now,
And now I'm afraid—

"And I have never been a quitter,
Now it's something to consider,
Just consider me somebody from your past.
The only thing that's satisfying
Is not the time I wasted crying,
But when I stopped, that's when the time ran out so fast.

"You're just a waste of time to me, Katie,
And you're a waste of time and air and space,
And I've been wasting time on you, Katie,
There isn't any time left I can waste.
No way!…"

Thursday, February 13, 2020

Saints + Scripture

'Tis the festival of Saint Huna of Thorney, Priest & Hermit, O.S.B. (died circa 690, also spelt Huno): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Fulcran of Lodève, Bishop (died 1006), Bishop of Lodève (949-1006): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Lodève.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Jordan of Saxony, Religious, O.P. (circa 1190-1237, A.K.A. of Alamania), second (II) Master of the Order of Preachers (1222-1237; O.P., A.K.A. the Dominicans): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Masters, Order-link O.P., & Wikipedia-link O.P.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Cristina of Spoleto, Religious, O.S.A. (1435-1458, A.K.A. Agostina Camozzi): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Archangela Girlani, Religious, O.Carm. (1460-1494, A.K.A. Eleanora Girlani), prioress of a monastery in Mantua: Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Thursday of the Fifth Week in Ordinary Time
The First Book of Kings, chapter eleven, verses four thru thirteen;
Psalm One Hundred Six (R/. four[a]), verses three & four, thirty-five & thirty-six, & thirty-seven & forty;
The Gospel according to Mark, chapter seven, verses twenty-four thru thirty.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel a feisty woman engages Jesus in an argument. It is one of the only scenes in the Gospels where someone cajoles Jesus into doing something he wouldn’t ordinarily do.

There is a long tradition that stresses the woman’s perseverance in the face of the "test" that Jesus sets for her. There is another reading that shows how the woman exemplifies the proper attitude toward God, a combination of humility and boldness, of deference and defiance.

But the reading I want to emphasize is one conditioned by the philosophy of the "other." The Old Testament speaks insistently of the "stranger, the widow, and the orphan," those who have no one to care for them. They press upon us even when we would greatly prefer them just to go away.

We the Church are the Body of Christ, the physical presence of Christ in the world. And so people come to us demanding food, sustenance, friendship, love, shelter, liberation. So often we are tempted to do what Jesus does initially and what the disciples do: tell them to back off.
But the whole of the Christian life consists in remembering the suffering and need of the annoying other.
Video reflection by Father Roger Lopez, O.F.M. (U.S. Con. of Catholic Bishops): Daily Reflection.


Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 32
The Book of Exodus, chapter twelve, verses forty-three thru fifty-one.

Commentary: The Ordinance of the Passover (Exodus, 12:43-51).

Scripture Study—Deep in Scripture Podcast
The Letter of James, chapter one (of five; verses one thru twenty-seven);
The Letter of James, chapter two (verses one thru twenty-six);
The Letter of James, chapter three (verses one thru eighteen);
The Letter of James, chapter four (verses one thru seventeen);
The Letter of James, chapter five (of five; verses one thru twenty).

Commentary: Salutation (James, 1:1), Faith & Wisdom (1:2-8), Poverty & Riches (1:9-11), Trial & Temptation (1:12-27), Warning against Partiality (2:1-13), Faith without Works Is Dead (2:14-26), Taming the Tongue (3:1-12), Two Kings of Wisdom (3:13-18), Friendship with the World (4:1-10), Warning against Judging Another (4:11-12), Boasting about Tomorrow (4:13-17), Warning to Rich Oppressors (5:1-6), Patience in Suffering (5:7-12), & the Prayer of Faith (5:13-20).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Someone would have a poor idea of human & marital love by thinking that affection & joy vanish when difficulties come. This is when we really see what motivates people. Here also is where gift & tenderness are consolidated, because true love does not think about itself, but about how to increase the good of the beloved."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, r. 1978-2005; feast: 22 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"My little Queen entered Carmel yesterday. God alone could have asked such a sacrifice, but He is helping me so powerfully that in the midst of my tears my heart is overflowing with joy."
—St. Louis Martin (1823-1894, feast: 12 July)

Wednesday, February 12, 2020

The Rebel Black Dot Exodus 90 Song o' the Day


Audrey Assad, "Death in His Grave" from the Death, Be Not Proud E.P. (St. Mike Papa Whiskey)

Commentary: Remember your death, O Christian, but remember that your death is the gateway to your true & everlasting life.

Operation ÖSTERREICH: Exodus 90, Day 31

Weekly Wednesday Weigh-in
Last weigh-in: 344.8 lbs
This weigh-in: 342.6 lbs.
Difference: -2.2 lbs.


Bonus! Lied von ÖSTERREICH
"Weird Al" Yankovic, "Grapefruit Diet" from Running with Scissors (Mike Papa Watercress)

Commentary:
"Oh, I think I'd sell my soul for a triple patty melt,
But I need a boomerang when I put on my belt!

"Grapefruit diet (Diet!),
Lay off the Three Musketeers,
Grapefruit diet (Diet!),
Until my big booty disappears,
Grapefruit diet (Diet!),
I eat 'em 'til they're coming out of my ears,
Grapefruit diet (Diet!),
'Cause I haven't seen my feet in years…"

Saints + Scripture

Better Late than Never | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

'Tis the festival of Saint Julian the Hospitaller (born circa 7, A.K.A. the Poor): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Eulalia of Barcelona, Virgin & Martyr (circa 290-303; also spelt Aulaire, etc.), martyred in the reign of the Roman emperors Diocletian & Maximian, a victim of the Great Persecution (303-313): Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Persecutions-link & Wikipedia-link Great Persecution.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Sedulius, Priest (died circa 450; A.K.A. Siadhel, Coelius Sedulius, Caelius Sedulius), composer of the hymn "A solis ortus cardine" ("From the Pivot of the Sun's Rising"): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link "A solis ortus cardine."

'Tis also the festival of Saint Æthelwold of Lindisfarne, Bishop & Abbot (died circa 740; also spelt Ethelwald, etc.), ninth (IX) Bishop of Lindisfarne (721-740), , abbot of Old Melrose Abbey, who contributed to the production of the Lindisfarne Gospels: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Diocese-link Lindisfarne & Wikipedia-link Lindisfarne, & Wikipedia-link Lindisfarne Gospels.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Benedict of Aniane, Abbot, O.S.B. (circa 747-821, the "Second Benedict;" A.K.A. Witiza), founding abbot of Kornelimünster Abbey (814-821), formally the Abbey of the Abbot Saint Benedict of Aniane & Pope Cornelius; a foe of the Adoptionist heresy: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Kornelimünster, & Heresy-link & Wikipedia-link Adoptionism.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Antony Kauleas, Bishop & Abbot (circa 829-901, A.K.A. Anthony II of Constantinople), eighty-eighth (LXXXVIII) Patriarch of Constantinople (893-901), who presided over the Fourth Council of Constantinople (869-870, the eighth [VIII] ecumenical council): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Constantinople, & Council-link & Wikipedia-link Constantinople IV.

'Tis also the festival of Blesseds James Fenn, George Haydock, Thomas Hemerford, John Mundyn, & John Nutter, Priests & Martyrs (died 1584), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I; Haydock is one of the Eighty-five Martyrs of England & Wales; Fenn, Haydock, Mundyn, & Nutter are four of the one hundred sixty Martyrs of Douai: Martyr-link Juliett Foxtrot & Wikipedia-link Juliett Foxtrot, Martyr-link Golf Hotel & Wikipedia-link Golf Hotel, Martyr-link Tango Hotel & Wikipedia-link Tango Hotel, Martyr-link Juliett Mike & Wikipedia-link Juliett Mike, & Martyr-link Juliett November & Wikipedia-link Juliett November; Martyr-link England & Wales & Wikipedia-link England & Wales, & Martyr-link Douai & Wikipedia-link Douai.

Commentary: Bl. John Nutter is brother of the priest & martyr Bl. Robert Nutter, O.P. [26 July].

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Wednesday of the Fifth Week in Ordinary Time
The First Book of Kings, chapter ten, verses one thru ten;
Psalm Thirty-seven (R/. thirty[a]), verses five & six, thirty & thirty-one, & thirty-nine & forty;
The Gospel according to Mark, chapter seven, verses fourteen thru twenty-three.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel Jesus teaches that evil comes from within. From our hearts "come evil thoughts, unchastity, theft, murder, adultery, greed, malice, deceit, licentiousness, envy, blasphemy, arrogance, folly."

The Church teaches that such evils are consequences of original sin. The doctrine holds that there is something fundamentally off about us, that all is not well, that we are off-kilter, skewed, mixed up. We Catholics don’t hold to a doctrine of total depravity, but we do indeed hold that original sin has worked its way into every nook and cranny of our lives: our minds, our wills, our desires and passions, even our very bodies.

As G.K. Chesterton argued a century ago, original sin is the only doctrine for which there is empirical evidence, for we can feel it within ourselves and we can see the effects of it everywhere.

One of the surest signs of our dysfunction is that we tend to celebrate all of the wrong people and despise or look down upon the best people. Pay very close attention to the people that you don’t like, to those that you consider obnoxious; it might tell you a lot about your own spiritual state.
Video reflection by Jem Sullivan, Ph.D. (U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops): Daily Reflection.


Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 31
The Book of Exodus, chapter twelve, verses thirty-seven thru forty-two.

Commentary: The Exodus: From Rameses to Succoth (concluded; Exodus, 12:37-42).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Welcome Christ into your lives. Without the experience of this interior meeting with Christ, life can all too easily be wasted on illusory & consumerist experiences. These obviously include the suicidal experience of drugs or the egoistic one of using our neighbor & rejecting solidarity."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, r. 1978-2005; feast: 22 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Let us humbly number ourselves among the imperfect, see ourselves as little souls. Yes, it is enough to humble oneself & to bear with one’s imperfections meekly. That is true sanctity."
—St. Thérèse of the Child Jesus, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"We have a job to do. We have to get the Faith into our heads & into our hearts—not just for the information, but to let it sink in deeply—so that we can go out & rescue a culture that has rejected God & does not know who they are as human beings."
—Tim Staples (fl. 2020)

Tuesday, February 11, 2020

The Explorers' Club, № DCCXXXII

Operation AXIOM: After the World War—The Armenian Genocide, Part V
21 January-13 February 1920: The Maraş Affair—Turkish Nationalists attacked French colonial forces throughout Cilicia, leading to a three-week siege of Maraş; on the verge of the Turks agreeing to a ceasefire, the French withdrew, leading to the Turkish massacre of twelve thousand-plus Armenian civilians; five thousand Armenians fled alongside the French, but only fifteen hundred reached safety.





Lest we forget.

Commentary: The French commander who ordered the inexplicable & disastrous retreat, Robert Normand—who originated the order but lied, claiming to be acting on orders from above—later played a significant rôle in the construction of the infamous Maginot Line.

The Rebel Black Dot Exodus 90 Song o' the Day


"Weird Al" Yankovic, "Livin' in the Fridge" from Alapalooza (St. Mike Papa Whiskey)

Saints + Scripture

The Popish Plot
"Off Topic from St. Scholastica: Holiness"

'Tis the Optional Memorial of Our Lady of Lourdes (apparitions 11 February-16 July 1858): Madonna-link ūna, Madonna-link duæ, Madonna-link Array of Hope, & Wikipedia-link.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
The first of these is the apparition of 11 February 1858, when fourteen-year-old [St.] Bernadette Soubirous [16 April] told her mother that a "lady" spoke to her in the cave of Massabielle while she was gathering firewood with her sister & a friend. Similar apparitions of the "Lady" were reported on eighteen occasions that year, until the climax revelation of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception took place.
Quoth
Minute Meditations from the Popes:
O Mary, you appeared to the humble young woman St. Bernadette Soubirous, to call us to conversion. Help me to respond to that call with generosity.
Wikipedia-link Grotto of Massabielle, Wikipedia-link Sanctuary of Our Lady of Lourdes, Wikipedia-link Lourdes water, & Wikipedia-link Lourdes grottoes


'Tis also the World Day of the Sick (established 1992): Day-link ūnus, Day-link duo, & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Soteris, Virgin & Martyr (died circa 305, A.K.A. Sotra, etc.), martyred in the reign of the Roman emperors Diocletian & Maximian, a victim of the Great Persecution (303-313): Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Persecutions-link & Wikipedia-link Great Persecution.

Commentary: Kinswoman of the bishop & Doctor of the Church St. Ambrose of Milan [7 December].

'Tis also the festival of Saint Cædmon, Religious (died circa 684, A.K.A. Cadfan), composer of "Cædmon's Hymn" (circa 657-680): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link "Cædmon's Hymn."

'Tis also the festival of Saint Gregory II, Pope (669-731), eighty-ninth (LXXXIX) Bishop of Rome (715-731), an opponent of the first bout of the Byzantine iconoclastic heresy: Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Pontifex-link, & Wikipedia-link Pontifex; & Heresy-link & Wikipedia-link Iconoclasm.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Paschal I, Pope, O.S.B. (died 824, A.K.A. Pascale Massimi), ninety-eighth (XCVIII) Bishop of Rome (817-824), an opponent of the second bout of the Byzantine iconoclastic heresy: Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Pontifex-link, & Wikipedia-link Pontifex; & Heresy-link & Wikipedia-link Iconoclasm.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Pedro de Jesús Maldonado Lucero, Priest & Martyr (1892-1937), martyred in the reign of the Mexican president Lázaro Cárdenas, one of the twenty-five Martyrs of the Mexican Revolution, part of the larger group of Saints of the Cristero War: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyr-link México, Wikipedia-link México, & Wikipedia-link Cristero War.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Tuesday of the Fifth Week in Ordinary Time
The First Book of Kings, chapter eight, verses twenty-two, twenty-three, & twenty-seven thru thirty;
Psalm Eighty-four (R/. two), verses three, four, five & ten, & eleven;
The Gospel according to Mark, chapter seven, verses one thru thirteen.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel Jesus calls the Pharisees hypocrites because they "disregard God’s commandment but cling to human tradition."

For instance: "If someone says to father or mother, ‘Any support you might have had from me is
qorban’ (meaning, dedicated to God), you allow him to do nothing more for his father or mother." If you claim to be a person of love, but fail to honor your parents, something is seriously off. Thus the hypocrisy of the Pharisees is a disregard of love.

In its essence, love is an act of the will—more precisely, the willing of the good of the other as other. To love is really to want what is good for someone else and then to act on that desire.

Real love is a leaping outside of the narrow confines of my needs and desires, and an embrace of the other’s good for the other’s sake. It is an escape from the black hole of the ego, which tends to draw everything around it into itself.
Video reflection by Deacon Miguel Santos (U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops): Daily Reflection.

Mass Readings—Optional Memorial of Our Lady of Lourdes
The Book of Isaiah, chapter sixty-six, verses ten thru fourteen(c);
The Book of Judith (R/. chapter fifteen, verse nine), chapter thirteen, verses eighteen(b/c/d/e), nineteen;
The Gospel according to John, chapter two, verses one thru eleven.

Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 30
The Book of Exodus, chapter twelve, verses thirty-one thru thirty-six.

Commentary: The Tenth Plague: The Death of Egypt's First-born (concluded; Exodus, 12:31-32) & the Exodus: From Rameses to Succoth (Exodus, 12:33-36).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Lourdes is a prophecy of justice & peace, where there is no room for pride & hardness of heart. Indeed, Lourdes is where this hardness is dissolved by one's witness of charity, mercy, serene resistance to evil, human solidarity, & sincere & moving generosity."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, r. 1978-2005; feast day: 22 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"The closer we get to Christ, the less certain we are of any merit of our own. Just study the way St. Paul characterizes himself in his epistles, in intervals of four, five, & six years between the letters. At first he says, I am the chief of the apostles, I have labored more abundantly than any of them. He works a little longer & then he says, I am not worthy to be called a member of the Church, & the least worthy of all of the apostles. Finally he ends up by calling himself the chief of sinners. St. Peter, too became wiser, his first letter begins, Peter, apostle of Jesus Christ. Here's a clear-cut affirmation of what he is. A few years later, Peter changes & he begins his letter, Simon Peter. Simon, poor weak human nature—Simon Peter, apostle servant of Christ."
—Ven. Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)
Catholic Quote o' the Day
"Science—the very instrument that's being used by modern atheists to say that there is no God—is screaming at us that there's a God! The discoveries of thermodynamics, the Hubble Space Telescope, & Einstein's Theories of Relativity have exploded in the scientific world & have led untold numbers of scientists to faith in God."
—Tim Staples (floruit 2020)