Sunday, June 30, 2019

The Explorers' Club, № DCXCVI

Operation AXIOM: After the World War—The Paris Peace Conference, Part V
28 June 1919: The Treaty of Versailles was signed—Months of talks originally intended only to agree the Entente's position before negotiations with Germany resulting in a "take it or leave it" treaty; the Weimar chancellor, Philipp Scheidemann, resigned from office; after the Entente threatened invasion, the new chancellor, Gustav Bauer, capitulated; China, alone among the Entente, refused to sign.





Lest we forget.

Saints + Scripture: XIII Sunday in Tempus per annum

'Tis the Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time (Tempus per annum, "time during the year"): Wikipedia-link.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time
The First Book of Kings, chapter nineteen, verses sixteen(b), nineteen, twenty, & twenty-one;
Psalm Sixteen, verses one & two, five, seven & eight, nine & ten, & eleven;
The Letter to the Galatians, chapter five, verses one & thirteen thru eighteen;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter nine, verses fifty-one thru sixty-two.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel Jesus rebukes James and John for their desire for vengeance. We are walking with Jesus and his disciples as they make their way to Jerusalem. As they pass through Samaria, they are refused hospitality, for their destination is Jerusalem, and this annoys the Samaritans. Bothersome? Stupid? Racist? Sure, all of those things. As a result, James and John (the sons of thunder) cry out: “Lord, do you want us to call down fire from heaven to consume them?”

Can you hear echoes of this cry up and down the ages? Whenever people have been unjustly treated, excluded, looked down upon, they experience, naturally enough, feelings of hatred and a desire to get back. Correctly enough, they will say that their family or their race or their country was offended, and so they, with justification, react.

But Jesus turns only to rebuke them. Why? Because following him and his way of nonviolence is more important than race or country or ethnic group. Our feelings for him have to go beyond even our justified feelings for these good things.
Video reflection by Father Greg Friedman, O.F.M.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Video reflection by Father Claude Burns (uCatholic): Weekend Reflection with Father Pontifex.

Audio reflection by Scott Hahn, Ph.D. (St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology): Breaking the Bread.


Scripture Study—Day 91: Covenant Crag, Day 14
The Book of Genesis, chapter eleven, verses one thru nine.

Commentary: The Tower of Babel (Genesis, 11:1-9).

Mass Journal: Week 31
Reflection by Matthew Kelly, founder of the Dynamic Catholic Institute:
Holines brings us to life. It refines every human ability. Holiness doesn't dampen our emotions; it elevates them. Those who respond to God's call to holiness are the most joyful people in history. They have a richer, more abundant experience of life, & they love more deeply than most people can ever imagine. They enjoy life, all of life. Even in the midst of suffering they are able to maintain a peace & a joy that are independent of the happenings & circumstances surrounding them. Holiness doesn't stifle us; it sets us free. The surest signs of holiness are not how often a person goes to church, how many hours he spends in prayer, what good spiritual books he had read, or even the number of good works he performs. The surest sign of holiness are an insatiable desire to become all God created us to be, an unwavering commitment to the will of God, & an unquenchable concern for unholy people. Living a holy life means letting our decisions be guided by the Holy Spirit. It means allowing each moment to be all it can be.


Otherwise, 30 June would be the festival of the First Martyrs of the Holy Roman Church (died 64), martyred in the reign of the Roman emperor Nero: Martyrs-link ūnus, Martyrs-link duo, & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Bertrand of Le Mans, Bishop (circa 553-623, A.K.A. Bertechramnus), Bishop of Le Mans: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Le Mans.

'Twould also be the festival of Blessed Ramon Llull, Martyr, T.O.S.F. (circa 1232-1315, the Doctor Illuminatus ["Enlightened Doctor"], Anglicized as Raymond Lull), martyred by a mob in the reign of the Marinid sultan Abu Sa'id Uthman II: Martyr-link ūnus, Martyr-link duo, & Wikipedia-link.

'Twould also be the festival of Blessed Zynoviy Kovalyk, Priest & Martyr, C.Ss.R. (1903-1941; also transliterated Zenon, Zenobius), martyred in the reign of the Communist dictator Joseph Stalin, one of the Martyrs Killed under Communist Regimes in Eastern Europe: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link Eastern Europe.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Remember how the first Christians, most of them simple & humble people, suffering the most cruel persecutions, were successful in spreading Christ's message to all part of the empire. Their only weapons were prayer, the Gospel, & the Cross."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, feast day: 22 October)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"I will always have to stay little to be worthy of His glances, but I'll grow in virtue under the brightness of this star of Heaven."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"The Father loves the Son & the Son loves the Father. Love is not in one alone; love is not in the other. The love that we have for one another is not just in me & not just in you. Love is always a bond between two or among several. That is why even lovers will speak of our love, something outside of the lovers themselves. So love is not in the Father, love is not in the Son, love is the mysterious bond uniting both. Because we are here dealing with the infinite, that divine love is so deep, so profound that it cannot express itself by canticles, words, or embraces. It can express itself only by that which signifies the fullness arid exhaustion of all giving, namely, a sigh. Something that’s too deep for words. That is why the bond of love between the Father & the Son is called the Holy Breath, the Holy Spirit. As the three angles of the triangle do not make three triangles, but one, so there are three Persons or three relationships in God, but only one God."
—Venerable Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Lord's Day


They Might Be Giants, "The End of the Tour" from John Henry (The Last Angry Sir Knight)

Commentary: Today is the last day on which Fourth Degree Full Regalia can be worn by Knights of Columbus. The New Uniform, introduced two years ago, in August 2017, will be the only authorized uniform for Color Corps use after the expiration of the "grandfather" period for the Full Regalia. The members of my assembly are unanimous in choosing not to transition to the New Uniform; instead, we are simply retiring the Assembly's Color Corps. This is a sad day, but we are going out proudly, with a corporate communion for Council 6742 at Holy Family Parish in Grand Blanc.

Above, the Color Corps of Fourth Degree Assembly 0510 at a flag retirement ceremony on Flag Day, 14 June 2019. (Your humble narrator is second from the end of the line, obscured by the Stars & Stripes.) Below, members of that selfsame Color Corps at a Forty Days for Life prayer vigil in 2016.


Saturday, June 29, 2019

Saints + Scripture: Solemnity of Saints Peter & Paul


Religious Freedom Week '19
United States Conference of Catholic Bishops: YouTube-link & U.S.C.C.B.-link.

'Tis the Solemnity of Saints Peter & Paul, Apostles (died circa 64; A.K.A. Simon, Cephas; A.K.A. Saul of Tarsus), first (I) Bishop of Rome, martyred in the reign of the Roman emperor Nero: Apostles-link Peter & Paul & Wikipedia-link Peter & Paul, Apostle-link Peter & Wikipedia-link Peter, & Apostle-link Paul & Wikipedia-link Paul; Apostles-link & Wikipedia-link Apostles; & Pontiffs-link & Wikipedia-link Pontiff.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
This is a liturgical feast in honor of the martyrdom in Rome of the apostles St. Peter & St. Paul. The celebration is of ancient origin, the date selected being the anniversary of either their death[s] or the translation of their relics.
Quoth
Minute Meditations from the Popes:
Lord Jesus, You called St. Peter by the Sea of Galilee & St. Paul on the road to Damascus. Call me again & entrust Your sacred mission into my hands.
Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Solemnity of Ss. Peter & Paul
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter twelve, verses one thru eleven;
Psalm Thirty-four, verses two & three, four & five, six & seven, & eight & nine;
The Second Letter to Timothy, chapter four, verses six, seven, eight, seventeen, & eighteen;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter sixteen, verses thirteen thru nineteen.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, today’s Gospel spells out the importance of Peter’s confession. For it is upon this inspired confession that the Church is built. Not, mind you, on popular opinion, which is shifting and indecisive, and not on personal holiness, which is all too rare. It is built upon the inspired authority of Peter—and I say, "thank God!"

We make this troubling and extraordinary claim that it is through a special charism of the Spirit that Peter and his successors govern the Church. Now, I realize that I have many Protestant readers and that this text has been, between Catholics and Protestants, a stumbling block. Let me clarify what is and is not at stake here.

What is the focus of Peter’s confession? It has to do with who Jesus is. This is the rock upon which the Church is built. We don’t say for a moment that all of Peter’s practical decisions are right, that everything he says is right. But we are saying that he is right about who Jesus is: a man who is also the Son of the living God. And this is the source and ground of the whole operation.
Video reflection by Marc DelMonico, Ph.D.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Mass Readings—Vigil of Ss. Peter & Paul
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter three, verses one thru ten;
Psalm Nineteen, verses two & three, four & five;
The Letter to the Galatians, chapter one, verses eleven thru twenty;
The Gospel according to John, chapter twenty-one, verses fifteen thru nineteen.

Scripture Study—Day 91: Covenant Crag, Day 13
The Book of Genesis, chapter ten, verses one, two, six, twenty-one, thirty-one, & thirty-two.

Commentary: Nations Descended from Noah (Genesis, 10:1-2, 6, 21, 31-32).



Otherwise, 29 June would be the Memorial of the Immaculate Heart of Mary: Madonna-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Alliance of the Hearts.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. The Solemnity of the Sacred Heart of Jesus is always held on the Friday after the Solemnity of Corpus Christi, a pair of highly moveable feasts; the feast of Mary's Immaculate Heart is observed on the Saturday following (the next day), unless it is superseded by a higher-ranking feast, such as today's Solemnity of Saints Peter & Paul (29 June) or, as happened two years ago, the Solemnity of the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist (24 June).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Neither success nor failure must ever cause you to forget your vocation as servant. Allow the Lord to grant growth when & how He chooses. At the same time, imitate the Apostle Paul who knew how to suffer want & to live in abundance, ready for anything."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, feast day: 22 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"What is the Mass? The Mass is a drama; it's not a tragedy because there's a Resurrection. In every great drama there is first of all the conception of it strong in the mind of the artist. Second, there are long rehearsals, the choosing of characters & types; third, there is opening night; & fourth, there are road companies. The drama of the Mass was conceived in the mind of the eternal dramatist, for the Lamb was slain from the beginning of the world. Then there were the rehearsals & the types & the choosing of characters: Paschal lamb, the serpent, & the many other instances & prototypes of sacrifice in the Old Testament. Then came the opening night, the Last Supper, which looked forward to the cross. And then the Lord sent out His road companies, His priests: 'Do this in memory of Me.' Same action, same words, same drama, only different characters pronouncing the lines. When, therefore, we begin the Mass, we are reaching back to the cross of Calvary & lifting it out of its rocks & planting it right down here in our midst. Every time a Mass is offered, Calvary is represented somewhere on earth."
—Ven. Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)

Friday, June 28, 2019

Saints + Scripture: The Most Sacred Heart of Jesus

Better Late than Never | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

The Popish Plot
"Sacred Heart"

Gracefully Catholic
"Ideas for Celebrating the Solemnity of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus!"


Religious Freedom Week '19
United States Conference of Catholic Bishops: YouTube-link & U.S.C.C.B.-link.

'Tis the Solemnity of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus: Sacred Heart-link, Wikipedia-link Sacred Heart, & Wikipedia-link Feast; Wikipedia-link Alliance of the Hearts.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
Roman Catholic devotions which takes the heart of the resurrected Body as the representation of the love by Jesus Christ God, which is "His heart, pierced on the Cross," & "in the texts of the New Testament is revealed to us as God's boundless & passionate love for mankind."
Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Solemnity of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus
The Book of Ezekiel, chapter thirty-four, verses eleven thru sixteen;
Psalm Twenty-three, verses one, two, & three(a); three(b) & four; five; & six;
The Letter to the Romans, chapter five, verses five(b) thru eleven;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter fifteen, verses three thru seven.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, one feature of today’s Gospel passage is the craziness of the shepherd: “What man among you, having a hundred sheep and losing one, wouldn’t leave the ninety-nine and go after the lost one until he finds it?” Well, the implied answer is “No one.” Who would take that great a risk, putting the ninety-nine in danger to find the one? It’s just bad economics. Why would God fret over one little soul? Why would he bother?

Well, it’s his nature. It’s what he does. As Catherine of Siena put it, he is
pazzo d’amore (crazy in love). God is as crazy for you as if you were the only one in the world.
Video reflection by the Reverend Pat O'Brien: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Video reflection by Scott Hahn, Ph.D.: St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology.


Gracefully Catholic
The Feast of Saints Peter & Paul is tomorrow!"

Mass Readings—Vigil of Ss. Peter & Paul
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter three, verses one thru ten;
Psalm Nineteen, verses two & three, four & five;
The Letter to the Galatians, chapter one, verses eleven thru twenty;
The Gospel according to John, chapter twenty-one, verses fifteen thru nineteen.

Scripture Study—Day 91: Covenant Crag, Day 12
The Book of Genesis, chapter nine, verses eighteen thru twenty-eight.

Commentary: Noah & His Sons (Genesis, 9:18-28).



Otherwise, 28 June would be the festival of Saint Irenaeus, Bishop & Martyr (circa 130-202, of Lyon), second (II) Bishop of Lyon (then Lugdunum), martyred in the reign of the Roman emperor Septimius Severus; a Father of the Church, author of On the Detection and Overthrow of the So-Called Gnosis, also known as Adversus Haereses ("Against Heresies"): Martyr-link ūnus, Martyr-link duo, Martyr-link The True Enlightenment!, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Lyon, Fathers-link, Wikipedia-link Fathers, & Wikipedia-link Adversus Haereses.


Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Paul I, Pope (700-767), ninety-third (XCIII) Bishop of Rome: Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Pontiffs-link & Wikipedia-link Pontiff.

Commentary: Brother, & successor, of Pope Stephen II.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint John Southworth, Priest & Martyr (circa 1592-1654), martyred in the reign of the English warlord Oliver Cromwell, one of the Forty Martyrs of England & Wales: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link England & Wales & Wikipedia-link England & Wales.

'Twould also be the festival of Blessed Yakym Senkivskyi, Priest & Martyr (1896-1941), martyred in the reign of the Communist dictator Joseph Stalin, one of the Martyrs Killed under Communist Regimes in Eastern Europe: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link Eastern Europe.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"God's heart calls to our hearts, inviting us to come out of ourselves, to forsake our human certainties, to trust in Him, & by following His example, to make ourselves a gift of unbounded love."
—Pope Benedict XVI (born 1927, reigned 2005-2013)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"Our Lord does not come down from Heaven every day to lie in a golden ciborium. He comes to find another heaven which is infinitely dearer to Him—the heaven of our souls."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"If you are submerged in the waters of infidelity & inconstancy, plunge yourself into the fathomless deep of the Sacred Heart. Its stability & steadfastness will teach you to be faithful to Him… as He has ever been in His love for us."
—St. Margaret Mary Alacoque (1647-1690, feast day: 16 October)

Thursday, June 27, 2019

Saints + Scripture

Better Late than Never | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!


Religious Freedom Week '19
United States Conference of Catholic Bishops: YouTube-link & U.S.C.C.B.-link.

'Tis the Optional Memorial of Saint Cyril of Alexandria, Bishop & Doctor of the Church (circa 376-444), twenty-sixth (XXVI) Patriarch of Alexandria & a Father of the Church who played a crucial role at the Council of Ephesus (431, the third ecumenical council): Doctor-link ūnus, Doctor-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Diocese-link Alexandria & Wikipedia-link Alexandria: Doctors-link & Wikipedia-link Doctors; Fathers-link & Wikipedia-link Fathers; & Council-link Ephesus & Wikipedia-link Ephesus.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Nephew of St. Theophilus of Alexandria [28 October].

Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
He was the Patriarch of Alexandria from 412 to 444. He was enthroned when the city was at the height of its influence & power within the Roman Empire. Cyril wrote extensively & was a leading protagonist in the Christological controversies.
'Tis also the festival of Our Lady of Perpetual Help (A.K.A. Our Lady of Perpetual Succor): Madonna-link & Wikipedia-link.


'Tis also the festival of Saint Arialdo of Milan, Deacon & Martyr (circa 1010-1066), martyred by partisans of the simoniac archibshop Guido da Velate, a leader of the pataria: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Pataria.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Ladislaus (circa 1040-1095, King Ladislaus I of Hungary; A.K.A. László, Lancelot): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Thursday of the Twelfth Week in Ordinary Time
The Book of Genesis, chapter sixteen, verses one thru twelve, fifteen, & sixteen
(or, the Book of Genesis, chapter sixteen, verses six[b] thru twelve, fifteen, & sixteen);
Psalm One Hundred Six, verses one(b) & two, three & four(a), & four(b) & five;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter seven, verses twenty-one thru twenty-nine.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, today’s Gospel asks how we apply the Lord’s teaching. "Everyone who listens to these words of mine and acts on them will be like a wise man who built his house on rock. The rain fell, the floods came, and the winds blew and buffeted the house. But it did not collapse." This is the heart of it: if you are rooted in God, then you can withstand anything, precisely because you are linked to that power which is creating the cosmos. You will be blessed at the deepest place, and nothing can finally touch you.

But the one who does not take Jesus’ words to heart "will be like the fool who built his house on sand. The rain fell, the floods came, and the winds buffeted the house. And it collapsed and was completely ruined." When the inevitable trials come, the life built on pleasure, money, power, or fame will give way.

So the question is a simple one: Where do you stand? How goes it with your heart? On what, precisely, is the whole of your life built?
Video reflection by the Reverend John Crossin, O.S.F.S.: U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Mass Readings—Optional Memorial of St. Cyril of Alexandria
The Second Letter to Timothy, chapter four, verses one thru five;
Psalm Eighty-nine, verses two & three, four & five, twenty-one & twenty-two, & twenty-five & twenty-seven;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter five, verses thirteen thru nineteen.

Scripture Study—Day 91: Covenant Crag, Day 11
The Book of Genesis, chapter nine, verses one thru thirteen.

Commentary: The Covenant with Noah (Genesis, 9:1-13).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Our religion, which is truth, is Divine reality in human history. It cannot be discovered or invented. It is received &, ancient though it is, it is always alive, always new."
—Pope St. Paul VI (1897-1978, feast day: 29 May)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"t is interesting to make a comparison between Peter & Judas. Our Lord warned both that they would fail. They both failed. They both denied or betrayed the Lord. They both repented. But the difference in the word repent is that Judas repented unto himself & Peter repented unto the Lord. They were the same up to that point. St. Paul, therefore, says there were two kinds of sorrow, the sorrow of the world & the sorrow of true faith. Judas no longer had any hope, having refused to return to the Savior. He took a rope & went out to some rocky ground, we know not where it was. He walked over the rocky ground, & those rocks seemed just as hard & cruel as his own heart, & the limb of every tree seemed like a pointing finger. Traitor, traitor, traitor. And the knot in every tree seemed like an accusing eye. And he hanged himself. And as the Acts of the Apostles tells us, 'His bowels burst asunder.' And he went to his own place. That is all."
—Ven. Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Saints + Scripture

Better Late than Never | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

The Popish Plot
"33 Days to Morning Glory, Week 2: St. Maximilian Kolbe"


Religious Freedom Week '19
United States Conference of Catholic Bishops: YouTube-link & U.S.C.C.B.-link.

'Tis the festival of Saint José María Robles Hurtado, Priest & Martyr (1888-1927, the "Madman of the Sacred Heart"), martyred in the reign of the Mexican strongman Plutarco Elías Calles, one of the Saints of the Cristero War (A.K.A. the Martyrs of the Mexican Revolution): Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link México, Wikipedia-link México, & Wikipedia-link La Cristiada.

'Tis also the festival of Blesseds Mykola Konrad, Priest, & Volodymyr Pryjma, Martyrs (died 1941), martyred in the reign of the Communist dictator Joseph Stalin: Martyr-link Mike Kilo & Wikipedia-link Mike Kilo, Martyr-link Victor Papa & Wikipedia-link Victor Papa.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Ya'Qūb of Ghazīr, Priest, O.F.M. Cap. (1875-1954, A.K.A. Khalīl al-Haddād): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Josemaría Escrivá, Priest (1902-1975, the "Saint of Ordinary Life"), founder of Opus Dei, formally the Prelature of the Holy Cross & Opus Dei, & the Priestly Society of the Holy Cross: Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Opus Dei & Wikipedia-link Priestly Society.


Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Wednesday of the Twelfth Week in Ordinary Time
The Book of Genesis, chapter fifteen, verses one thru twelve, seventeen, & eighteen;
Psalm One Hundred Five, verses one & two, three & four, five & six, & seven & eight;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter seven, verses fifteen thru twenty.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel Jesus tell us that a tree is known by its fruits. In the fifth chapter of his letter to the Galatians, Paul makes this very specific. He tells us that the fruits of the Holy Spirit are “love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control,” implying that the Spirit’s presence in one’s life can be read from its radiance in these soul-expanding qualities.

All of Paul’s “fruits of the Holy Spirit” are marks of an outward-looking, expansive
magna anima (great soul), which stands in contradistinction to the pusilla anima (the cramped soul) of the sinner. Thus, love is willing the good of the other as other; joy is self-diffusive; patience bears with the troublesome; kindness makes the other gentle; self-control restricts the havoc that the ego can cause; etc.

When is the Spirit present? When these attributes are awakened and sustained; when our souls are made great
Video reflection by Jem Sullivan, Ph.D.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Scripture Study—Day 91: Covenant Crag, Day 10
The Book of Genesis, chapter nine, verses one thru thirteen.

Commentary: The Covenant with Noah (Genesis, 9:1-13).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Jesus became a baby, He became poor, He became a victim, so that no one might feel that He was above or distant; He placed Himself at the feet of all. Jesus is for all, He belongs to all, & indeed to each of us individually."
—Pope St. Paul VI (1897-1978, feast day: 29 May)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"Jesus, how tenderly & gently You lead my soul!"
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"There resides in us the raw material for living with & by the Spirit of God. Why didn't our Lord remain on earth? There could have been many advantages. We could have been thrilled by the majesty of His bearing, awed by His presence & His words. Yet He said: “It is better for you that I go. For if I go not, the Spirit will not come to you”—the Holy Spirit. The Spirit will not come. If Jesus had remained on earth, He would always be outside of us, like an example to be copied, like a model outside of an artist. If He left & sent His Spirit, then He would be a veritable life to be lived. So Christ sends His Spirit to us."
—Venerable Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKAfter Party


Operation AXIOM
Ich Bin Ein Berliner, "Fifties Girl" from In Ska We Trust (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary: Fifty-six years ago to the day, 26 June 1963, United States president John F. Kennedy delivered the famous "Ich bin ein Berliner" speech, proclaiming the solidarity of all free men with the besieged denizens of West Berlin. One must recall that the Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin has attempted to starve West Berlin into submission just fifteen years earlier with the Berlin Blockade of 1948-1949. The equivalent from right now is 2004-2005, which doesn't seem that long ago, reminding us how near 1948-1949 was to 1963. J.F.K. gave the "Ich bin ein Berliner" speech, 26 June 1963, fifty-six year ago today.

Operation ÖSTERREICH

Weekly Wednesday Weigh-in
Last weigh-in: 325.8 lbs
This weigh-in: 322.8 lbs.
Difference: -3.0 lbs.

Tuesday, June 25, 2019

Saints + Scripture: XII Week in Tempus per annum

Better Late than Never | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!


Religious Freedom Week '19
United States Conference of Catholic Bishops: YouTube-link & U.S.C.C.B.-link.

'Tis the festival of Saint Prosper of Reggio (died circa 466), Bishop of Reggio Emilia: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Reggio Emilia.

'Tis also the festival of Saint William of Montevergine, Abbot, O.S.B. (1085-1142, A.K.A. of Vercelli), founder of the Benedictine Williamites, formally the Order of Monte Vergine, & the Abbey of Montevergine: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Order & Wikipedia-link Abbey.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Dorothea of Montau, Religious (1347-1394, A.K.A. Dorothea Swarte): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Tuesday of the Twelfth Week in Ordinary Time
The Book of Genesis, chapter thirteen, verses two & five thru eighteen;
Psalm Fifteen, verses one(b), two & three(a), three(b/c) & four(a/b), & five;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter seven, verses six, twelve, thirteen, & fourteen.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel Jesus warns, “Enter through the narrow gate; for the gate is wide and the road broad that leads to destruction, and those who enter through it are many.”

A question that people have been asking from time immemorial is this: “Will only a few people be saved?” Heaven, hell, salvation, damnation—who will be in and who will be out?

We have remained, understandably enough, fascinated with these issues and questions for a long time. But the official answer of the Church is that we don’t know. We are clearly warned about the real possibility of damnation. We do indeed know that there are many in heaven, for the saints are formally declared to be so. But there are no anti-saints in the Church; there is no one whom the Church has formally declared to be a denizen of hell.

Therefore, without succumbing for a moment to anything-goes presumption, we are permitted to hope that all people might be saved. Indeed, St. Paul writes to Timothy: “God wants all people to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth.”

So pray, hope, and strive to enter through the narrow gate.
Video reflection by Father Jack Ledwon: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Scripture Study—Day 91: Covenant Crag, Day 9
The Book of Genesis, chapter eight, verses one, two, three, & five thru twelve.

Commentary: The Flood Subsides (Genesis, 8:1-3, 5-12).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"The history of the human race in the world is not a procession of blind forces. It is a marvelous & vital working out of the actual history of the Divine Word."
—Pope Venerable Pius XII (1876-1958)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"How sweet is the way of love!"
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"The descent of the Holy Spirit on our Lord in the Jordan had a double effect. First, it prepared Him for combat, for battle. This is what the gospel states: 'Jesus returned from the Jordan full of the Holy Spirit & by the Spirit He was led out into the wilderness where He remained forty days, tempted by the devil.' Just as soon as He received the Holy Spirit, He entered into the battlefield, into the conflict with Satan, who offered Him the three easy ways from the cross. The Holy Spirit did something else. The Spirit not only prepared Jesus for combat, but also prepared Him for preaching the kingdom of God. When our Lord, therefore, appeared at Nazareth, He said, 'The Spirit of the Lord is upon Me; He has anointed Me, sent Me out to preach the gospel to the poor, to restore the broken-hearted, to bid the prisoners go free, & the blind to have sight, to set the oppressed at liberty, to proclaim a year when men find acceptance in the Lord.' Now after our Lord had received the Spirit & fulfilled these two missions, He instituted a sacrament, the Sacrament of Confirmation, by which this power & energy & strength of being a soldier of Christ & witness to Christ & the kingdom of God passes into our souls."
—Venerable Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)

Monday, June 24, 2019

The Explorers' Club, № DCXCV

Operation AXIOM: After the World War—To Live & Die at Scapa Flow, Part II
21 June 1919: The German High Seas Fleet (Hochseeflotte) interned at Scapa Flow, fearful that their ships would be seized by the victorious Entente as soon as the Treaty of Versailles was signed (a well grounded fear), was scuttled in a disciplined manuever; British guards intervened, killing nine German sailors—the last casualties of the World War—but fifty-two of the seventy-four German ships sank.





Lest we forget.

Saints + Scripture: The Nativity of St. John the Baptist

Better Late than Never | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!


Religious Freedom Week '19
United States Conference of Catholic Bishops: YouTube-link & U.S.C.C.B.-link.

'Tis the Solemnity of the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist (six months B.C.): Baptist-link ūnus, Baptist-link duo, Wikipedia-link Baptist, Wikipedia-link Nativity, & Wikipedia-link Saint John's Eve.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Son of Ss. Zechariah [23 September] & Elizabeth [5 November].

Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
Christians have long interpreted the life of John the Baptist as a preparation for the coming of Jesus Christ, & the circumstances of his birth, as recorded in the New testament, are miraculous. John's pivotal place in the gospel is seen in the emphasis Luke gives to the announcement of his birth & the event itself, both set in prominent parallel to the same occurrences int he life of Jesus.
Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Solemnity of the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist
The Book of Isaiah, chapter forty-nine, verses one thru six;
Psalm One Hundred Thirty-nine, verses one(b), two, & three; thirteen & fourteen(a/b), & fourteen(c) & fifteen;
The Acts of the Apostles, chapter thirteen, verses twenty-two thru twenty-six;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter one, verses fifty-seven thru sixty-six & eighty.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, today’s Gospel celebrates the birth of John the Baptist. I think it’s fair to say that you cannot really understand Jesus without understanding John, which is precisely why all four Evangelists tell the story of the Baptist as a kind of overture to the story of Jesus.

John did not draw attention to himself. Rather, he presented himself as a preparation, a forerunner, a prophet preparing the way of the Lord. He was summing up much of Israelite history, but stressing that this history was open-ended, unfinished.

And therefore, how powerful it was when, upon spying Jesus coming to be baptized, he said, "Behold the Lamb of God." No first-century Israelite would have missed the meaning of that: behold the one who has come to be sacrificed. Behold
the sacrifice, which will sum up, complete, and perfect the temple. Moreover, behold the Passover lamb, who sums up the whole meaning of that event and brings it to fulfillment.

And this is why John says, "He must increase and I must decrease." In other words, the overture is complete, and now the great opera begins. The preparatory work of Israel is over, and now the Messiah will reign.
Video reflection by Monsignor James Vlaun: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Mass Readings—Vigil of the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist
The Book of Jeremiah, chapter one, verses four thru ten;
Psalm Seventy-one, verses one & two, three & four(a), five & six(a/b), & fifteen(a/b) & seventeen;
The First Letter of Peter, chapter one, verses eight thru twelve;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter one, verses five thru seventeen.

Scripture Study—Day 91: Covenant Crag, Day 8
The Book of Genesis, chapter seven, verses one & eleven thru twenty-four.

Commentary: The Great Flood (Genesis, 7:1, 11-24).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"An unexpected child, St. John the Baptist, called out to the people. He told them to prepare for a heavenly announcement, an invitation to universal rebirth."
—Pope St. John XXIII (1881-1963, feast day: 11 October)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"This fire from heaven—You have placed it in my soul & I, too, want to spread its passion."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"In the Sacrament of Confirmation, we are brought into God’s spiritual army & into the lay priesthood of believers. Confirmation, like any other sacrament, is modeled upon the life of our Lord. Jesus had a double priestly anointing, corresponding to two aspects of His life. First was the Incarnation; that made Him capable of being a victim for our sins. Because in the Incarnation He took upon Himself a body, the human nature with which He could suffer, & therefore redeem us from our sins. As God, He could not suffer, but as man He could. This first aspect of the life of our Blessed Lord culminated in His Passion & death & Resurrection. Now there was another aspect of His life, a second anointing as it were, & that was the coming of the Holy Spirit in the Jordan. That ordained Him for the mission of preaching the apostolate, & this reached its culmination, as far as the Church was concerned, in Pentecost."
—Venerable Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)

Sunday, June 23, 2019

Saints + Scripture: Most Holy Body & Blood of Christ

Better Late than Never | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!


Religious Freedom Week '19
United States Conference of Catholic Bishops: YouTube-link & U.S.C.C.B.-link.

'Tis the Solemnity of the Most Holy Body & Blood of Christ (Corpus Christi): Corpus Christi-link ūnus, Corpus Christi-link duo, & Wikipedia-link Corpus Christi.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
Liturgical solemnity celebrating the real presence of the body & blood of Jesus Christ the Son of God, in the elements of the Eucharist—known as transubstantiation.
Wikipedia-link Real Presence, Wikipedia-link Body of Christ, Wikipedia-link Eucharist, & Wikipedia-link Transubstantiation


Scripture of the Week
Mass Readings—Solemnity of the Most Holy Body & Blood of Christ (Corpus Christi)
The Book of Genesis, chapter fourteen, verses eighteen, nineteen, & twenty;
Psalm One Hundred Ten, verses one, two, three, & four;
The First Letter to the Corinthians, chapter eleven, verses twenty-three thru twenty-six;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter nine, verses eleven(b) thru seventeen.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, our Gospel today tells about the feeding of the five thousand. Jesus instructs the crowd to recline, and they do so on the grass. Taking the loaves and dried fish, Jesus makes a meal that satisfies the enormous crowd. They are hungry, tired, worn out from their exertions, and Jesus gives them sustenance for the day.

For Thomas Aquinas, the great metaphor for the Eucharist is sustenance, food for the journey. The Eucharist is daily food, sustenance for the journey, nourishment to get us through the day to day. How effective would we be if we never ate, or ate only on special occasions and in a festive environment? Not very. So, in the spiritual life, we must eat and drink or we will not have strength.

Is this just meant in some vague symbolic way? No, rather in a vividly analogical way. For just as the body needs physical nourishment, the spirit needs spiritual nourishment, and there is no getting around this law.

“Well, it’s no big deal if I stay away from Mass and refrain from receiving Communion.” Think again!
Video reflection by Father Greg Friedman, O.F.M.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Video reflection by Father Claude Burns (uCatholic): Weekend Reflection with Father Pontifex.

Audio reflection by Scott Hahn, Ph.D. (St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology): Breaking the Bread.


Mass Readings—Vigil of the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist
The Book of Jeremiah, chapter one, verses four thru ten;
Psalm Seventy-one, verses one & two, three & four(a), five & six(a/b), & fifteen(a/b) & seventeen;
The First Letter of Peter, chapter one, verses eight thru twelve;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter one, verses five thru seventeen.

Scripture Study—Day 91: Covenant Crag, Day 7
The Book of Genesis, chapter six, verses seventeen thru twenty-two.

Commentary: Noah Makes the Ark as God Commands (concluded; Genesis, 6:17-22).

Mass Journal: Week 30
Reflection by Matthew Kelly, founder of the Dynamic Catholic Institute:
Holiness & renewal are inseparably linked. Where there is holiness the Church has always thrived. If the Church is not thriving there is one primary reason for that… & when you & I begin to take God's call to live holy lives seriously, the Church will begin to thrive in new & exciting ways. Holiness is compatible with every state in life. Married people are called to live holy lives just as much as monks & nuns. Sexual intimacy is a profound gift from God & an instrument of holiness. The riches of this world have value only inasmuch as they help us fulfill our essential purpose. If we own them, they can be powerful tools that help us live holy lives. If they own us, they will prevent us from becoming the-best-version-of-ourselves. The rich are called to live holy lives by using their wealth in productive ways that foster their own growth & the growth of others. Material possesions, marriage & sexual intimacy, work, money, & positions of authority are just some of the opportunities life presents to live holy lives.


Otherwise, 23 June would be the festival of Blessed Lanfranco Beccari, Bishop (circa 1124-1198), Bishop of Pavia: Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link (Italian); Diocese-link Pavia & Wikipedia-link Pavia.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Peter of Juilly, Priest & Religious, O.S.B. (died 1136): Saint-link ūnus & Wikipedia-link.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Thomas Garnet, Priest & Martyr, S.J. (1574-1608), martyred in the reign of the Anglo-Scottish king James VI & I, one of the Forty Martyrs of England & Wales: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link England & Wales & Wikipedia-link England & Wales.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Giuseppe Cafasso, Priest (1811-1860, the "Priest of the Gallows;" Anglicized as Joseph Cafasso): Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Uncle of Bl. Guiseppe Allamano [16 February].

'Twould also be the festival of Blessed Ioan Suciu, Bishop & Martyr (1907-1953), martyred in the reign of the Communist dictator Gheorghe Gheorghiu-Dej: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Bl. Ioan was beatified on 2 June 2019.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Without illusions, without ideological utopias, we walk the streets of the world, bringing within us the Body of the Lord, like the Virgin Mary in the mystery of the Visitation."
—Pope Benedict XVI (born 1927, reigned 2005-2013)

Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"My one thought, Jesus, is to love You."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament is the living heart of each of our parishes."
—Pope St. Paul VI (1897-1978, feast day: 29 May)

The R.B.D. Song o' the Lord's Day: Corpus Christi


The Daughters of Mary, "Tantum Ergo" from De Profundis (The Last Angry Man)

Saturday, June 22, 2019

Saints + Scripture

Complex Simplex Edition | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!


Religious Freedom Week '19
United States Conference of Catholic Bishops

'Tis the Optional Memorial of Saint Paulinus of Nola, Bishop (circa 354-431, A.K.A. Pontius Meropius Anicius Paulinus): Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
Paulinus is traditionally credited with the introduction of bells to Christian worship & helped resolve the disputed election of Pope [St.] Boniface I [25 October].
'Tis also the Optional Memorial of Saints John Fisher, Bishop, & Thomas More, Martyrs (died 1535), Bishop of Rochester, martyred in the reign of the English king Henry VIII: Martyr-link Juliett Foxtrot ūnus, Martyr-link Juliett Foxtrot duo, & Wikipedia-link Juliett Foxtrot; Martyr-link Tango Mike ūnus, Martyr-link Tango Mike duo, & Wikipedia-link Tango Mike; & Diocese-link Rochester & Wikipedia-link Rochester.


Commentary: Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
Fisher was executed by order of Henry VIII during the English Reformation for refusing to accept the king as Supreme Head of the Church of England & for upholding the Roman Catholic Church's doctrine of papal supremacy.
Wikipedia-link Reformation



Commentary: Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
Thomas was an English lawyer, social philosopher, author, statesman, & noted Renaissance humanist, [imprisoned for] refusing to acknowledge Henry VIII as Supreme Head of the Church of England & the annulment of his marriage to Catherine of Aragon. After refusing to take the Oath of Supremacy, he was convicted of treason & executed.
Wikipedia-link Oath


'Tis also the festival of Saint Alban, Martyr (died circa 303, of Verulamium), the protomartyr of Britain, martyred in the reign of the Roman emperors Diocletian & Maximian, a victim of the Great Persecution: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Protomartyr & Wikipedia-link Persecution.

'Tis also the festival of Saint John IV of Naples, Bishop (died 835, the Peacemaker; A.K.A. Giovanni d'Acquarola, Giovanni Scriba), Bishop of Naples: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Diocese-link Naples, Wikipedia-link Diocese, & Wikipedia-link Archdiocese.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Innocent V, Pope, O.P. (circa 1225-1276, A.K.A. Pierre of Tarentaise), one hundred eighty-fifth (CLXXXV) Bishop of Rome, who attended the Second Council of Lyon (1274): Blessed-link ūnus, Blessed-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Pontiff-link, Wikipedia-link Pontiff, & Wikipedia-link Council.

Commentary: Not to be confused with St. Pierre of Tarentaise, O.Cist. [1102-1174, 14 September].

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Saturday of the Eleventh Week in Ordinary Time
The Second Letter to the Corinthians, chapter twelve, verses one thru ten;
Psalm Thirty-four, verses eight & nine, ten & eleven, & twelve & thirteen;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter six, verses twenty-four thru thirty-four.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, our Gospel today calls us to entrust our lives completely to God. How often the Bible compels us to meditate on the meaning of faith! We might say that the Scriptures rest upon faith, and that they remain inspired at every turn by the spirit of faith.

Paul Tillich said that “faith” is the most misunderstood word in the religious vocabulary, and I’ve always felt that he’s right about that. What is faith? Faith is an attitude of trust in the presence of God. Faith is openness to what God will reveal, do, and invite. It should be obvious that in dealing with the infinite, all-powerful person who is God, we are never in control.

This is precisely what we see in the lives of the saints: in Mother Teresa moving into the worst slum in the world in an attitude of trust; in Francis of Assisi just abandoning everything and living for God; in Rose Hawthorne deciding to take cancer sufferers into her own home; in Antony leaving everything behind and going into the desert; in Maximilian Kolbe saying, “I’m a Catholic priest; take me in his place.”

Do not worry, and depend on God for everything. Have faith!
Video reflection by Marc DelMonico, Ph.D.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Mass Readings—Optional Memorial of St. Paulinus of Nola
The Second Letter to the Corinthians, chapter eight, verses nine thru fifteen;
Psalm Forty, verses two, four(a/b), seven & eight(a), eight(b) & nine, & ten;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter twelve, verses thirty-two, thirty-three, & thirty-four.

Mass Readings—Optional Memorial of Ss. John Fisher & Thomas More
The First Letter of Peter, chapter four, verses twelve thru nineteen;
Psalm One Hundred Twenty-six, verses one(b/c) & two(a/b), two(c/d) & three, four & five, & six;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter ten, verses thirty-four thru thirty-nine.

Scripture Study—Day 91: Covenant Crag, Day 6
The Book of Genesis, chapter six, verses thirteen thru sixteen.

Commentary: Noah Makes the Ark as God Commands (Genesis, 6:13-16).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"In the present-day confusion of the notion of good & evil, licit & illicit, just & unjust, in the demoralizing spread of crime & immorality, we will do well to preserve & deepen the sense of natural law. This means the sense of justice, of integrity, & of the good."
—Pope St. Paul VI (1897-1978, feast day: 29 May)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"Jesus bore with me patiently, for He does not unfold everything at once to the soul. He gives His light little by little."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"I die the king's good servant, but God's first."
—St. Thomas More (1478-1535, feast day: 22 June)

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKAfter Party

Melbourne Ska Orchestra, "Perfect Storm" from Read All about It! (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary: There is a delightful 007-esque undertone to the music of "Perfect Storm." The lyrics speak to the current mood of dissatisfaction & foreboding.
"Time will play on you,
Best get illuminated to the view.

"Close doors and batten down,
Pressure's building, can you hear the sound?
Waking up to a different dawn,
Get ready for the perfect storm!
Ring bells and batten down,
Pressure's building, can you hear the sound?
Waking up to a different dawn,
Get ready for the perfect storm…"

Friday, June 21, 2019

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: SKAfter Party


Melbourne Ska Orchestra, "He's a Tripper" from Melbourne Ska Orchestra (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary:
"Number one producer,
He's a melody seducer,
There's a method in the madness plan…"

Saints + Scripture

Better Late than Never | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

'Tis the Memorial of Saint Aloysius Gonzaga, Religious, S.J. (1568-1591): Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Cousin of the martyr Bl. Rodolfo Acquaviva, S.J. [25 July].

Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
He was an Italian aristocrat who became a member of the Society of Jesus. While still a student at the Roman College, he died as a result of caring for the victims of a serious epidemic.
'Tis also the festival of Saint Martin of Tongres, Bishop (died circa 350), seventh (VIII) Bishop of Tongeren: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Tongeren.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Alban of Mainz, Priest & Martyr (died circa 400), martyred by pagan Vandals; a cephalophore: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Cephalophore.

'Tis also the festival of Saint John Rigby, Martyr (circa 1570-1600), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I, one of the Forty Martyrs of England & Wales: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link England & Wales & Wikipedia-link England & Wales.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Friday of the Eleventh Week in Ordinary Time
The Second Letter to the Corinthians, chapter eleven, verses eighteen & twenty-one thru thirty;
Psalm Thirty-four, verses two & three, four & five, & six & seven;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter six, verses nineteen thru twenty-three.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel Jesus tells his disciples not to store up treasures for themselves on earth, but to store up treasures in heaven, "where neither moth nor decay destroys, nor thieves break in and steal."

St. Augustine once said that since every creature is made
ex nihilo, it carries with it the heritage of nonbeing. There is a kind of penumbra or shadow of nothingness that haunts every finite thing.

This is a rather high philosophical way of stating what all of us know in our bones: no matter how good, beautiful, true, or exciting a thing or state of affairs is here below, it is destined to pass into non-being. Think of a gorgeous firework that bursts open like a giant flower and then, in the twinkling of an eye, is gone forever. Everything is haunted by non-being; everything, finally, is that firework.

But this is not meant to depress us; it is meant to redirect our attention precisely to the treasures of heaven, to the eternity of God. Once we see everything in light of God, we can learn to love the things of this world without clinging to them and without expecting too much of them. Think of how much disappointment and heartache could be avoided if we only learned this truth!
Video reflection by Jem Sullivan, Ph.D.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Mass Readings—Memorial of St. Aloysius Gonzaga
The First Letter of John, chapter five, verses one thru five;
Psalm Sixteen, verses one, two(a), & five; seven & eight; & eleven;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter twenty-two, verses thirty-four thru forty.

Scripture Study—Day 91: Covenant Crag, Day 5
The Book of Genesis, chapter six, verses one, two, & four thru nine.

Commentary: The Wickedness of Mankind (Genesis, 6:1-2, 4-9).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"To construct this world you have to undertake great tasks. If you want your legitimate ideals to be meaningful & not halfhearted, beginning now you must be daring, patient, & sincere with yourselves. You must also have an unshakeable faith."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, feast day: 22 October)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"What mysteries we shall one day see unveiled!"
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Jesus Christ is very much like the light of the sun. The sun is so very bright that if we are to understand its inner beauty, we have to shoot that sunlight through a prism, & when we do, it splits up into the seven rays of the spectrum. And so Our Blessed Lord, having a life that is infinitely rich, shoots this divine light through the prism of the Church & it splits up, not into the seven rays of the spectrum, but into the seven sacraments of the Church."
—Venerable Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)

Thursday, June 20, 2019

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' Today: SKAfter Party


Less Than Jake, "Short Fuse Burning" from Anthem (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary: Denounce me as unimaginative & derivative if you like, but the lyrics of "Short Fuse Burning" express my state of mind more perfectly than I could myself.
"These are all the reasons why
I'll be exploding tonight,
And why this chip on my shoulder
Feels like a mile wide:
It's from the overwork,
Overtime compromise.

"So I'm looking tonight
For some peace of mind,
Maybe then I'll find
Some strength inside,
'Cause I've lost any hope of ever changing.
I'm a short fuse burning!
I'm a short fuse burning!

"And remember who I,
Who I used to be,
Because this one-trick pony's
So strung out on routine,
Yeah, stuck on repeat,
Like you wouldn't even believe.

"So I'm looking tonight
For some peace of mind,
Maybe then I'll find
Some strength inside,
'Cause I've lost any hope of ever changing.
I'm a short fuse burning!

"Hey, everybody don't forget me, forget me,
Hey, everybody don't forget me,
I forgot who I used to be!
And I'm a short fuse burning,
I'm so close to exploding,
So everybody don't forget me,
I forgot who I used to be.

"So I'm looking tonight
For some peace of mind,
Maybe then I'll find
Some strength inside,
'Cause I've lost any hope of ever changing.
I'm a short fuse burning.

"Hey, everybody don't forget me, forget me,
Hey, everybody don't forget me,
I forgot who I used to be!
And I'm a short fuse burning,
I'm so close to exploding,
So everybody don't forget me,
I forgot who I used to be."

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' Yesterday: SKAfter Party

Mittwich, 19. Juni
Melbourne Ska Ochestra, "Learn to Love Again" from Melbourne Ska Ochestra (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary: Right now, the future—tonight, tomorrow, the day after tomorrow—looks relentlessly bleak, but I know that's only because I'm so very weary; I ache all over & a fog shrouds my mind.
"You're wondering how it got to this,
Dwelling on your hits and miss,
Don't be so tough on your healing heart,
Endings, they come and go like the start.

"The history books are full of tales,
Of floating ships that never sailed,
Think of the seas yet to explore,
Treasures wash up on the shore.

"Everything must have its day,
Sun will rise up again!

"Don't cry, here comes your summer,
In time, you'll find another,
You'll fly and smile like you really should,
You'll learn to love again…"

Saints + Scripture

Better Late than Never | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

The Popish Plot
Theology Thursday: "Corpus Christi"

'Tis the festival of Saint Adalbert of Magdeburg, Bishop & Abbot, O.S.B. (circa 910-981, the "Apostle to the Slavs"), inaugural (I) Archbishop of Magdeburg: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Magdeburg.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Giovanni of Matera, Abbot, O.S.B. (circa 1070-1139, A.K.A. of Pulsano, Anglicizes as John), founding abbot of an abbey at Pulsano: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Margareta Ebner, Religious, O.P. (circa 1291-1351): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Blesseds Dermot O'Hurley, Bishop, & Margaret Ball, Martyrs (died 1584, also spelt Diarmaid Ó Hiarlatha & Maighréad Ball), Archbishop of Cashel, martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I, two of the Irish Martyrs: Martyr-link Delta Oscar & Wikipedia-link Delta Oscar, Martyr-link Mike Bravo & Wikipedia-link Mike Bravo; Diocese-link Cashel & & Wikipedia-link Cashel; & Martyrs-link Éire, & Wikipedia-link Éire.

'Tis also the festival of Blesseds John Fenwick, John Gavan, William Harcourt, Anthony Turner, & Thomas Whitbread; Priests & Martyrs, S.J. (died 1679), martyred in the reign of the Anglo-Scottish king Charles II, victims of the perjurer Titus Oates's "Popish Plot" hoax: Martyr-link Juliett Foxtrot & Wikipedia-link Juliett Foxtrot, Martyr-link Juliett Golf & Wikipedia-link Juliett Golf, Martyr-link Whiskey Hotel & Wikipedia-link Whiskey Hotel, Martyr-link Alpha Tango & Wikipedia-link Alpha Tango, & Martyr-link Tango Whiskey & Wikipedia-link Tango Whiskey; Plot-link & Wikipedia-link Plot.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Thursday of the Eleventh Week in Ordinary Time
The Second Letter to the Corinthians, chapter eleven, verses one thru eleven;
Psalm One Hundred Eleven, verses one(b) & two, three & four, & seven & eight;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter six, verses seven thru fifteen.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, the Gospel for today is of great significance, for in it the Son of God teaches us to pray. We hear from not just a guru, a spiritual teacher, or a religious genius, but from the very Son of God. This is why the Our Father, the Lord’s Prayer, is the model of all prayer.

The Lord’s Prayer is the prayer for the Christian journey which has been offered up consistently for the past two thousand years. Think for a moment how this prayer links us to all of the great figures in Christian history, from Peter and Paul to Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Francis of Assisi, John Henry Newman, G.K. Chesterton, John Paul II, and right up to the present day.

Keep in mind that prayer is not designed so much to change God’s mind or to tell God something he doesn’t know. God isn’t like a big city boss or a reluctant pasha whom we have to persuade. Rather, he is the one who wants nothing other than to give us good things—though they might not always be the things we want.
Video reflection by Father Roger Lopez, O.F.M.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Scripture Study—Day 91: Covenant Crag, Day 4
The Book of Genesis, chapter four, verses sixteen thru twenty-six.

Commentary: Beginnings of Civilization (Genesis, 4:16-26).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Our world is suffering in the icy grip of selfishness & fever. It needs to feel the certainty that renews & confirms forever the great work of the Covenant: 'The Lord chooses you, the Lord loves you.'"
—Pope St. Paul VI (1897-1978, feast day: 29 May)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"I understand now that charity consists in bearing with the faults of others, in not being surprised at their weakness, in being edified by the smallest acts of virtue we see them practice."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"You & I came into the world to live; He came into the world to offer His life for us."
—Venerable Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)