Wednesday, July 31, 2019

Bonus! Song o' the Day: 40 Jahre


William Shatner, "Has Been" from Has Been (The Last Angry Man)

Commentary:
"…What are you afraid of, failure?
So am I.

"(Has Been. Has Been.)

"'Has Been' implies failure. Not so!

"(Has Been. Has Been.)

"Has Been's history,
Has Been was,
Has Been—might again!"

Saints + Scripture

Better Late than Never | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

The Popish Plot
"Catholic T-shirt Club Unboxing: St. Anthony of Padua"

'Tis the Memorial of Saint Ignatius of Loyola, Priest, S.J. (1491-1556, A.K.A. Íñigo López de Loyola), founder & first Superior General of the Jesuits (S.J.), formally the Society of Jesus, & author of the Spiritual Exercises: Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, Saint-link Array of Hope, & Wikipedia-link; Order-link S.J., Wikipedia-link S.J., & Wikipedia-link Black Pope; & Wikipedia-link Spiritual Exercises.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
St. Ignatius of Loyola grew from being inflamed by the ideals of courtly love & knighthood to become an expert in spiritual direction & founder of the Jesuits.
'Tis also the festival of Saint Neot, Priest (died circa 877, the "Pygmy Saint"): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Helena of Skövde (circa 1101-1160, A.K.A. Elin, Anglicized as Helen of Sköfde): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Alphonse-Marie Eppinger, Religious (1814-1867, the "Niederbronn Ecstatic," A.K.A. Élisabeth Eppinger), foundress of the Sisters of the Divine Redeemer:: Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Bl. Alphonse-Marie was beatified on 9 September 2018.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Zdenka Schelingová, Religious & Martyr, S.C.S.C. (1916-1955, A.K.A. Cecília Schelingová), martyred in the reign of the Communist dictator Antonín Novotný: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Wednesday of the Seventeenth Week in Ordinary Time
The Book of Exodus, chapter thirty-four, verses twenty-nine thru thirty-five;
Psalm Ninety-nine, verses five, six, seven, & nine;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter thirteen, verses forty-four, forty-five, & forty-six.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, today Jesus offers two parables about the kingdom of heaven. Let's focus on the first one: “The kingdom of heaven is like a treasure buried in a field, which a person finds and hides again.”

Sometimes God’s love is found that way. There’s a saying: “Life is what happens to you while you’re busy making other plans.” Sometimes in the course of our everyday lives, something happens that vividly and surprisingly summons us to union with God. We realize, in a flash, what it’s all about. We weren’t particularly looking for it, but it found us.

That's what Jesus is getting at today. As you walk through the fields of life, be open to the inrushing of grace when you least expect it. And when it comes, give up anything that holds it back.
Video reflection by Jem Sullivan, Ph.D.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Mass Readings—Memorial of St. Ignatius of Loyola
The First Letter to the Corinthians, chapter ten, verse thirty-one thru chapter eleven, verse one;
Psalm Thirty-four, verses two & three, four & five, six & seven, eight & nine, & ten & eleven;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter fourteen, verses twenty-five thru thirty-three.

Scripture Study—Day 91: Progeny Point, Day 3
The Book of Genesis, chapter twenty-five, verses twenty-one.

Commentary: The Birth of Jacob & Esau (Genesis, 25:21).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Do not make concessions as regards truth & goodness. Do not stoop to compromise on the Gospel values that must be the basis of your life. For they are the foundation of your new life inaugurated by Christ."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, feast day: 22 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"If God causes you to suffer much, it is a sign that He has great designs for you, & that He certainly intends to make you a saint. And if you wish to become a great saint, entreat Him yourself to give you much opportunity for suffering; for there is no wood better to kindle the fire of holy love than the wood of the cross, which Christ used for His Own great sacrifice of boundless charity."
—St. Ignatius of Loyola (1491-1556, feast day: 31 July)

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: 40 Jahre


Fountains of Wayne, "Bright Future in Sales" from Welcome Interstate Managers (the Last Angry Man)

Commentary:
"I'm gonna get my shit together (together),
'Cause I can't live like this forever (forever),
You know I've come too far and I don't wanna fail,
I got a new computer and a bright future in sales…"

Tuesday, July 30, 2019

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: 40 Jahre


The Mighty Mighty Bosstones, "I Wrote It" from Pin Points and Jin Joints (The Last Angry Rude Boy)

Skammentary:
"I wrote it with a golf pencil I pulled out of my blazer,
A crest sewn on the chest read, 'Old Gold Rugby Football Club,'
Worn at one time by a man that at one time went to Yale,
Then he worked a while on Wall Street 'til the market collapsed.

"I was at a barroom that was someone on the southern shore of Boston,
The tender of the bar poured me a whiskey on the house,
I have a love for whiskey, I chased it with a beer,
I have a love for Boston and I loved writing it there.

"I wrote it in a notebook that somebody let me borrow,
'Don't use all the paper please and if you could bring it back to me tomorrow,'
It was a fair request and I was grateful for the loan,
I had to jot a thought down I came up with on my own.

"I wrote it in October and I mention that because
Out of all the months there are I've always liked that one the best,
I don't know why I bring this up, but there are times I wonder what
Had ever happened to that man, I wonder, after the collapse.

"I wrote it in a notebook that somebody let me borrow,
'Don't use all the paper please and if you could bring it back to me tomorrow,'
It was a fair request and I was grateful for the loan,
I had to jot a thought down I came up with on my own.

"I wrote, I wrote it for you.
I wrote, I wrote it for you.
I wrote, I wrote it for you.
I wrote, I wrote it for you.

"I wrote it and hour or so, so really not much longer,
I put the pencil in the shot glass and I buttoned up my blazer,
I stepped out of the bar into the cold October sun,
I must return the notebook, it's not important what I wrote."

Saints + Scripture

'Tis the Optional Memorial of Saint Peter Chrysologus, Bishop & Doctor of the Church (circa 380-450, the “Doctor of Homilies”): Doctor-link ūnus, Doctor-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Ravenna & Wikipedia-link Bishops; & Doctors-link & Wikipedia-link Doctors.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
Peter Chrysologus was Bishop of Ravenna from about 433 until his death. he is known as the :Doctor of Homilies" for the concise but theologically rich reflections he delivered during his time as the bishop.
'Tis also the festival of Saint Tatwine of Canterbury, Bishop, O.S.B. (circa 670-734), tenth (X) Archbishop of Canterbury: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Diocese-link Canterbury, Wikipedia-link Canterbury, & Wikipedia-link Bishops.

'Tis also the festival of Blesseds Thomas Abel, Richard Featherstone, & Edward Powell, Priests & Martyrs (died 1540; also spelt Abell, also spelt Fetherston), martyred in the reign of the English king Henry VIII: Martyr-link Tango Alpha & Wikipedia-link Tango Alpha, Martyr-link Romeo Foxtrot & Wikipedia-link Romeo Foxtrot, & Martyr-link Echo Papa & Wikipedia-link Echo Papa.

Commentary: Bls. Thomas, Richard, & Edward were twinned with & executed alongside a trio of Lutherans: Robert Barnes, Thomas Gerrard, & William Jerome. The Catholics were hanged, drawn, & quartered for treason; the Lutherans were burned at the stake for heresy.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Leopold of Castelnuovo, Priest, O.F.M. Cap. (1866-1942, the "Apostle of Unity," A.K.A. Bogdan Ivan Mandić): Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Solanus Casey, Priest, O.F.M. Cap. (1870-1957, A.K.A. Bernard Francis Casey): Blessed-link ūnus, Blessed-link duo, & Wikipedia-link.


Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Tuesday of the Seventeenth Week in Ordinary Time
The Book of Exodus, chapter thirty-three, verses seven thru eleven & chapter thirty-four, verses five(b) thru nine & twenty-eight;
Psalm One Hundred Three, verses six & seven, eight & nine, ten & eleven, & twelve & thirteen;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter thirteen, verses thirty-six thru forty-three.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in our Gospel today Jesus explains the parable of the weeds among the wheat. God’s word creates the Church, the community of those who strive to build up the kingdom. But this Church is never absolutely pure and untrammeled, for God’s ways are opposed by a spiritual power, an enemy. His task is to sow weeds among the wheat—clandestinely, quietly, unobtrusively.

This sort of coming together of good and evil is to be expected. The Church will always be a place of saints and sinners, and the sinners will often look like saints. The enemy of the Church, who never rests, ensures it.

Vigilance in regards to evil is necessary in a fallen world, yet we must be wary of a zeal that, in its passion for setting things right, comes to believe that evil can be dealt with by destroying what is good.

In the midst of a fallen world, what is expected of us is that we live in hope that at the end, at harvest time, the Master will separate the good from the bad.
Video reflection by Father Greg Friedman, O.F.M.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Mass Readings—Optional Memorial of St. Peter Chrysologus
The Letter to the Ephesians, chapter three, verses eight thru twelve;
Psalm One Hundred Nineteen, verses nine, ten, eleven, twelve, thirteen, & fourteen;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter six, verses forty-three, forty-four, & forty-five.

Scripture Study—Day 91: Progeny Point, Day 2
The Book of Genesis, chapter twenty-five, verses twelve thru eighteen.

Commentary: The Descendants of Ishmael (Genesis, 25:12-18).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"If humanity 'groans & travails in pain,' it does so to the extent that people's minds & hearts are not lifted up with Christ to God. Their consciences are not conformed through Christ to the wisdom that comes from God."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, feast day: 22 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Anyone who wishes to frolic with the devil cannot rejoice with Christ."
—St. Peter Chrysologus, Doctor of the Church (380-450, feast day: 30 July)

Monday, July 29, 2019

The Explorers' Club, № DCCI

Operation AXIOM: After the World War—The Red Scare, Part VIII
27 July-3 August 1919: The Chicago Race Riot—Economic migration, veterans returning from the World War, & a heat wave exploded into rioting after a murder at an informally segregated beach; Irish gangs, closely allied with the corrupt police, donned blackface & attacked white neighborhoods to incite reprisals; thirty-eight souls were lost before the Illinois National Guard restored order.





Lest we forget.

Commentary: The Chicago Race Riot was one of dozens of violent conflagrations across the United States throughout 1919, what civil rights campaigner James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938) called the "Red Summer."

Saints + Scripture

'Tis the Memorial of Saint Martha (died circa 80, of Bethany, the "Wonder Worker of Southern Gaul"), a Myrrhbearer: Saint-link ūna, Saint-link duæ, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Myrrhbearers.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
Martha of Bethany is a biblical figure described in the Gospels of Luke & John. Together with her siblings [Ss.] Lazarus & Mary of Bethany [29 July], she is described as living in the village of Bethany near Jerusalem. She was witness to Jesus resurrecting her brother, Lazarus.
Wikipedia-link Bethany

Quoth
Minute Meditations from the Popes:
Lord Jesus, You taught St. Martha a lesson in the true meaning of love. Help me to realize that You have called me to be Your friend & enable me to respond to that call with all my heart, soul, & strength.
'Tis also the festival of Saints Lazarus & Mary of Bethany (first century; A.K.A. Lazarus of the Four Days, the Resurrected): Saint-link Lima & Wikipedia-link Lima, & Wikipedia-link Mike.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Sulien, Abbot (sixth century), founding abbot of the abbey which gave rise to the village of Luxulyan: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Luxulyan.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Olaf, Martyr (circa 995-1030, A.K.A. King Olaf II of Norway, Olaf Haraldsson; also spelt Olave, Ólafr Haraldsson), martyred by pagan Vikings, the Rex Perpetuus Norvegiae ["Perpetual King of Norway"]: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Rex Perpetuus Norvegiae.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Urban II, Pope, O.S.B. (circa 1040-1099; A.K.A. Odo, also spelt Otho, Eudes; of Châtillon, of Lagery), one hundred fifty-ninth (CLIX) Bishop of Rome; who called the Council of Piacenza (1095), the Council of Clermont (1095), & the First Crusade (1096-1099): Blessed-link ūnus, Blessed-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Pontiffs-link & Wikipedia-link Pontiff; Wikipedia-link Piacenza, Wikipedia-link Clermont, Crusade-link, & Wikipedia-link Crusade.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Monday of the Seventeenth Week in Ordinary Time
The Book of Exodus, chapter thirty-two, verses fifteen thru twenty-four & thirty thru thirty-four;
Psalm One Hundred Six, verses nineteen & twenty, twenty-one & twenty-two, & twenty-three;
The Gospel according to John, chapter eleven, verses nineteen thru twenty-seven;
or, the Gospel according to Luke, chapter ten, verses thirty-eight thru forty-two.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, today’s Gospel is the story of Martha and Mary. I’d like to offer a fresh take on this famous little story. One of the principal marks of Jesus’ teaching and ministry is the overturning of social conventions. And one of the most striking and surprising of Jesus’ moves was a radical inclusion of women.

While this typically women’s work was going on, men would sit out in the main room of the residence and talk. If a prominent rabbi or Pharisee were present, the men would sit at his feet and listen to his words.

Now we can see why Mary’s attitude was so offensive to Martha and probably to everyone else in the room. Martha wasn’t simply mad that Mary was giving her more work to do; she was mad that Mary had the gall to assume the stance of a man, to take up her position in the men’s space.

In his response to Martha’s complaint, Jesus signals more than a preference for listening over acting; he invites a woman into full participation in the life of discipleship. “Mary has chosen the better part and it will not be taken from her.”
Video reflection by Monsignor James Vlaun: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Mass Readings—Memorial of St. Martha
The First Letter of John, chapter four, verses seven thru sixteen;
Psalm Thirty-four, verses two & three, four & five, six & seven, eight & nine, & ten & eleven;
The Gospel according to John, chapter eleven, verses nineteen thru twenty-seven;
or, the Gospel according to Luke, chapter ten, verses thirty-eight thru forty-two.

Scripture Study—Day 91: Progeny Point, Day 1
The Book of Genesis, chapter twenty-five, verses seven thru eleven.

Commentary: The Death of Abraham (Genesis, 25:7-11).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Lord Jesus, grant that those You have called Your friends may come to know in fullness the joy You have promised. May they know the joy of praising You, the joy of serving their brothers & sisters, the joy of abiding in Your love."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, feast day: 22 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"When does the soul die? Whenever there is the domination of the lower order over the higher order, whenever there is the domination of the individual over the community, of flesh over the spirit, of time over eternity, of the body over the soul, then there is death and that death we call sin. That is why scripture equates death in the biological order and sin in the moral order: “The wages of sin is death.” If you buy an electric coffee pot, you will find instructions. The instructions may read, “Do not plug this coffee pot in when the pot is empty.” Well, suppose you say, “Why should anybody tell me what to do? He's violating my constitutional rights.” When you say that, you forget that the manufacturer of that coffee pot gave you instructions in order that you might get perfect coffee out of it. Sin is a deliberate violation of the law of God. When God made us he gave us certain laws, not in order to destroy our freedom, but in order that we might perfect ourselves. When we violate those laws, we break a relationship, and we hurt ourselves. That is why in the parable of the prodigal son the father said of the prodigal, “He was dead. Now he is alive.”"
—Ven. Fulton Sheen (1895-1979)

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: 40 Jahre


Less Than Jake, "The Science of Selling Yourself Short" from Anthem (The Last Angry Man)

Skammentary:
"And so I sit and wait and wonder,
Does anyone else feel like me?
Someone so tired of their routines
And disappearing self-esteems…

"And so I sit and wait and wonder
Does anyone else feel like me?
I'm so overdosed on apathy
And burnt out on sympathy…

"Let the meaning slip away,
Lost my faith in another day,
Self-deprecation seems O.K.,
I never thought I'd make it anyway.

"(I'll sing along)
Yeah, with every emergency,
(Just sing along)
I'm the king of catastrophes,
(I'm so far gone)
That deep down inside I think it's fine by me
That I'm my own worst enemy,
That I'm my own worst enemy,
'Cause I'm my own worst enemy,
And I'm my own worst enemy,
'Cause I'm my own worst enemy,
'Cause I'm my own worst enemy."

Sunday, July 28, 2019

Saints + Scripture: XVII Sunday in Tempus per annum

'Tis the Seventeenth Sunday in Ordinary Time (Tempus per annum, "time during the year"): Wikipedia-link.

Scripture of the Week
Mass Readings—Seventeenth Sunday Week in Ordinary Time
The Book of Genesis, chapter eighteen, verses twenty thru thirty-two;
Psalm One Hundred Thirty-eight, verses one & two, two & three, six & seven, & seven & eight;
The Letter to the Colossians, chapter two, verses twelve, thirteen, & fourteen;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter eleven, verses one thru thirteen.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, our Gospel for today gives us an opportunity to reflect on the great prayer that Jesus taught us. Think how this prayer links us to all of the great figures in Christian history, from Peter and Paul to Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Francis of Assisi, John Henry Newman, G.K. Chesterton, John Paul II, and right up to the present day.

A desire to pray is planted deep within us. It just means the desire to speak to God and to listen to him. Keep in mind that prayer is not designed to change God’s mind or to tell God something he doesn’t know. God isn’t like a big city boss or a reluctant pasha whom we have to persuade. He is rather the one who wants nothing other than to give us good things—though they might not always be what we want.

Can you see how this prayer rightly orders us? We must put God’s holy name first; we must strive to do his will in all things and at all times; we must be strengthened by spiritual food or we will fall; we must be agents of forgiveness; we must be able to withstand the dark powers.
Video reflection by Father Greg Friedman, O.F.M.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Video reflection by Father Claude Burns (uCatholic): Weekend Reflection with Father Pontifex.

Audio reflection by Scott Hahn, Ph.D. (St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology): Breaking the Bread.


Mass Journal: Week 35
Reflection by Matthew Kelly, founder of the Dynamic Catholic Institute:
The saints were remarkable men & women, but surprisingly what made them remarkable was rarely anything too spectacular. What made them extraordinary was the ordinary. They strove to grow in virtue through the ordinary things of everyday life. If they were caring for the sick they were growing in humility. When they were educating children they were growing in patience. As Saint Thérèse of Lisieux said, "Do the little things with great love." There is nothing more attractive than holiness. Throughout history, whatever men & women of holiness have lived, the Church has blossomed. This is the answer to all of our problems: holiness of life.

What are you willing to live for? Just before her death, [Saint] Joan of Arc wrote, "I know this now. Every man gives his life for what he believes. Every woman gives her life for what she believes. Sometimes people believe in little or nothing, & yet they give their lives to that little or nothing. One life is all we have, & we live it as we believe living it & then it's gone. But to surrender what you are & to live without belief is more terrible than dying—even more terrible than dying young." What are you willing to give your life for?


Otherwise, 28 July would be the festival of Saint Nazarius & Celsus, Martyrs (died circa 68), martyred in the reign of the Roman emperor Nero, victims of the Neronian Persecution: Martyr-link November, Martyr-link Charlie, & Wikipedia-link; Persecutions-link & Wikipedia-link Persecution.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Victor I, Pope & Martyr (died 199), fourteenth (XIV) Bishop of Rome, martyred in the reign of the Roman emperor Septimius Severus: Martyr-link ūnus, Martyr-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Pontiffs-link & Wikipedia-link Pontiff.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Samson of Dol, Bishop & Abbot (circa 485-565, A.K.A. of York; also spelt Sampson, Samsun), one of the Seven Founder Saints of Brittany: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Brittany.

Commentary: Brother of Ss. Gwyneth of Cornwall & Veep [both 1 July].

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Jaime Hilario Barbal, Religious & Martyr, F.S.C. (1989-1937, A.K.A. Manuel Barbal i Cosín), martyred by Spanish Communist "Republicans": Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Twould also be the festival of Blessed Stanley Rother, Priest & Martyr (1935-1981), martyred by a Guatemalan death squad: Martyr-link ūnus, Martyr-link duo, & Wikipedia-link.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"The Eucharist is the privileged summit of the meeting of Christ's love for us; a love that is made available for each of us, a love that is made to be sacrificial lamb & food for our hunger for life. As the Apostle says, 'He loved me & gave Himself up for me.'"
—Pope St. Paul VI (1897-1978, feast day: 29 May)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"You pay God a compliment by asking great things of Him."
—St. Teresa of Ávila, Doctor of the Church (1515-1582, feast day: 15 October)

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Lord's Day: XVII

Matt Maher, "Land of My Father" from Saints and Sinners (The Last Angry Man)

Bonus! Song o' the Day: 40 Jahre


Fun (featuring Janelle Monáe), "We Are Young" from Some Nights (The Last Angry Man)

Commentary: May I please be middle aged? The goals posts keep moving! When I was a lad, one was middle age by thirty, maybe thirty-five, but definitely by forty. My sister devised a scheme whereby one was young until age thirty-three, middle aged until age sixty-six, & then old until death at age one hundred; whatever that fanciful scheme's flaws, it had the virtue of being consistent. If I, at forty, am still young, when do I get to be middle aged? At fifty? Fifty-five? I'm never going to collect Social Security, the system will be bankrupt decades before I become eligible; so, I can't use that as a line of demarcation. May I please just be middle aged now?

Saturday, July 27, 2019

The Loot: 40 Jahre

The title 40 Jahre is inspired by the film Good Bye, Lenin!, which made me aware that Communist East Germany, the German Democratic Republic (Deutsche Demokratische Republik, D.D.R.), celebrated its fortieth anniversary of (puppet) statehood in 1989, mere weeks before the fall of the Berlin Wall. I also considered the titles The 40-Year-Old Virgin or This Is 40, referencing the motion pictures of the same names, but there is something in the desperate, in fact already defeated boast of 40 Jahre D.D.R. that makes my black heart sing. Am I as doomed as East Germany? Probably, but aren't we all?


My closest kin were, as ever, overly generous.

Apollo 11 Anniversary
Flown Apollo 11 Kapton foil from the Columbia (1969)
First Lunar Landing 5th Anniversary envelope (1974)

Books
Pope Francis, Apostolic Exhortation Christus Vivit! (Christ Is Alive!)
Christopher Carstens, A Devotional Journey into the Mass: How Mass Can Become a Time of Grace, Nourishment, and Devotion
Sam Guzman, The Catholic Gentleman: Living Authentic Manhood Today
Ulrich L. Lehner, God Is Not Nice: Rejecting Pop Culture Theology and Discovering the God Worth Living For

Commentary: Carstens is one of the hosts of the podcast The Liturgy Guys, which your humble narrator enjoys immensely.

Motion Pictures
Congo (1995)

Commentary: I have an absurd fondness for Congo; objectively, I know it's a terrible film, but I prefer it to many other, "better" films all the same.

Haberdashery
"Fe Sharpens Fe" T-shirt
"Moses was the first person with a tablet downloading data from the cloud" T-shirt

Commentary: "Fe Sharpens Fe" references Proverbs, 27:17:
Iron sharpens iron,
and one man sharpens another.
The use of the symbol Fe, including iron's atomic number twenty-six, makes this not just a funny Christian T-shirt, but also a funny science T-shirt.

Unlike "Fe Sharpens Fe," the "Moses" T-shirt, which includes a graphic of the tablets of the Ten Commandments, wasn't on my list, but is a quality gift all the same. I wore it yesterday, because the First Reading at daily Mass was the Ten Commandments from the Book of Exodus, though at both Masses I attended (a birthday week treat to myself), the readings for the Memorial of Ss. Joachim & Anne were read instead, with the First Reading from the Book of Sirach.


Eaglemoss Star Trek Starships
№ 57: Romulan Bird-of-Prey (2260s)
№ 123: Romulan Science Vessel

Commentary: To the best of my knowledge, I now have every Romulan vessel in the Eaglemoss line.

Miscellany
Star Trek: The Next Generation P.A.D.D. journal
Star Trek stickers
Fountains of Wayne sticker

Saints + Scripture

The Popish Plot
"An Apology"

'Tis the festival of Saint Pantaleon, Martyr (circa 275-305, also spelt Panteleimon), martyred in the reign of the Roman emperors Diocletian & Maximian, a victim of the Great Persecution; one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers in the West & one of the Holy Unmercenaries in the East: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Persecutions-link & Wikipedia-link Persecution; & Holy Helpers-link, Wikipedia-link Holy Helpers, & Wikipedia-link Unmercenaries.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Celestine I, Pope (died 432), forty-third (XLIII) Bishop of Rome: Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Pontiffs-link, & Wikipedia-link Pontiff.

'Tis also the festival of Saints Aurelius & Natalia: Felix & Liliosa: & George, Deacon; Martyrs (died 852), martyred in the reign of the Umayyad king Abd ar-Rahman II, five of the forty-eight Martyrs of Córdoba: Martyr-link Alpha & Martyr-link November, Martyr-link Foxtrot & Martyr-link Lima, Martyr-link Golf, & Wikipedia-link V; Wikipedia-link Córdoba.

Commentary: Tell me again how Islam is always & everywhere a religion of peace, while Christianity—especially Catholicism—is uniquely vile & violent.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Robert Sutton, Priest & Martyr (circa 1544-1588), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I, one of the Eighty-five Martyrs of England & Wales: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link England & Wales & Wikipedia-link England & Wales.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed William Davies, Priest & Martyr (circa 1559-1593), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I, one of the Eighty-five Martyrs of England & Wales: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link England & Wales & Wikipedia-link England & Wales.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Saturday of the Sixteenth Week in Ordinary Time
The Book of Exodus, chapter twenty-four, verses three thru eight;
Psalm Fifty, verses one(b) & two, five & six, & fourteen & fifteen;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter thirteen, verses twenty-four thru thirty.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, our Gospel today is the parable of the wheat and the weeds. God sows his good seed, his word, his love and compassion, but his project is met with opposition. And the evil is such that it insinuates itself right into the very fabric of the good.

In classical theology, we speak of evil as a
privatio boni, a privation of the good, meaning that evil is always and everywhere parasitic on the good. Just as a parasite is living off of the healthy body (and thereby weakening it), so moral evil lives off of the good soul, the good society, the good Church (and thereby weakens them).

What is the result? That it is exceptionally difficult to extricate the evil from the good without damaging the good. That’s why it is extremely difficult—and often counter-productive—to go after these evils with a crusading spirit.

To be sure, there are certain evils that simply have to be addressed—right now, no questions, no hesitations. But there are other evils (and they really are evil) that are best left alone for the time being, lest more damage is done in the process of extricating them.
Video reflection by Harry Dudley, D.Min.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"If the Church is able to enter a preparation for the perennial coming of the Holy Spirit, He, the "Light of hearts," will not hesitate to come. He will give Himself for the joy, the light, the fortitude, the apostolic virtue, & the unitive charity that the Church needs today."
—Pope St. Paul VI (1897-1978, feast day: 29 May)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Private prayer is like straw scattered here & there: If you set it on fire it makes a lot of little flames. But gather these straws into a bundle & light them, & you get a mighty fire, rising like a column into the sky; public prayer is like that."
—St. Jean Vianney (1786-1859, feast day: 4 August)

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' the Day: 40 Jahre


Ben Folds, "Fred Jones, Part 2" from Rockin' the Suburbs (The Last Angry Man)

Commentary: Already done, & I never even really got started.
"…He's forgotten and not yet gone.

"And I'm sorry, Mr. Jones,
And I'm sorry, Mr. Jones,
And I'm sorry, Mr. Jones, it's time."

Friday, July 26, 2019

Bonus! Song o' the Day


They Might Be Giants, "Hypnotist of Ladies" from Apollo 18 (The Last Angry Man)

Commentary: Inspired by today's episode of the podcast Jimmy Akins's Mysterious World.

Saints + Scripture

'Tis the Memorial of Saints Joachim & Anne, Parents of the Blessed Virgin Mary (circa 50 B.C.-A.D. 15): Saints-link Juliett & Alpha, Saint-link Juliett & Wikipedia-link Juliett, & Saint-link Alpha & Wikipedia-link Alpha.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
Joachim is described as a rich & pious man, who regularly gave to the poor. At the temple, Joachim's sacrifice was rejected, as the couple's childlessness was interpreted as a sign of divine displeasure. Joachim consequently withdrew to the desert, where he fasted & did penance for forty days. Angels then appeared to both Joachim & Anne to promise them a child. Joachim later returned to Jerusalem & embraced Anne at the city gate, located in the Walls of Jerusalem. An ancient belief held that a child born of an elderly mother who had given up hope of having offspring was destined for great things.
'Tis also the festival of Blessed John Ingram, Priest & Martyr, S.J. (1565-1594), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I, one of the one hundred fifty-eight Martyrs of Douai: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link Douai & Wikipedia-link Douai.

'Tis also the festival of Blesseds Robert Nutter, O.P. & Edward Thwing, Priests & Martyrs (died 1600), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I, two of the Eighty-five Martyrs of England & Wales: Martyr-link Romeo November & Wikipedia-link Romeo November, Martyr-link Echo Tango & Wikipedia-link Echo Tango; Martyrs-link England & Wales & Wikipedia-link England & Wales.

Commentary: Bl. Robert is the brother of the priest & martyr Bl. John Nutter [12 February].

'Tis also the festival of Blessed William Ward, Priest & Martyr (circa 1560-1641, A.K.A. William Webster), martyred in the reign of the Anglo-Scottish king Charles I, one of the one hundred fifty-eight Martyrs of Douai: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link Douai & Wikipedia-link Douai.

We also commemorate Servant of God Jacques Hamel, Priest & Martyr (1930-2016), martyred by Muslim jihadists loyal to Daesh (I.S.I.L., the "Islamic State"), as he celebrated the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Normandy.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Friday of the Sixteenth Week in Ordinary Time
The Book of Exodus, chapter twenty, verses one thru seventeen;
Psalm Nineteen, verses eight, nine, ten, & eleven;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter thirteen, verses eighteen thru twenty-three.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel Jesus explains the parable of the sower. Let’s study each part of his explanation.

The seed sown on the path is “the one who hears the word without understanding it, and the evil one comes and steals away what was sown.” This means we might end up blocked from God because we lack education in the ways of the Spirit.

The seed sown on rocky ground is the one who “receives it at once with joy. But he has no root and lasts only for a time.” When difficulties and persecutions arrive, he loses confidence.

“The seed sown among thorns is the one who hears the word, but then worldly anxiety and the lure of riches choke the word and it bears no fruit.” Some people hear the word, but then they are unable to maintain their focus and sense of prioritization.

So from these sad cases we can construe the nature of good soil. When we understand the faith, when we take the time to read theology, to study the Scriptures; when we persevere, discipline ourselves, and practice the faith; when we have our priorities straight; then the seed will take root in us. And it will bear fruit thirty, sixty, or a hundredfold.
Video reflection by Jem Sullivan, Ph.D.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Mass Readings—Memorial of Ss. Joachim & Anne
The Book of Sirach, chapter forty-four, verses one & ten thru fifteen;
Psalm One Hundred Thirty-two, verses eleven, thirteen & fourteen, & seventeen & eighteen;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter thirteen, verses sixteen & seventeen.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Heat & food are not enough; there is also the heart; we must think of the heart of our old people. The Lord said that parents must be respected & loved, even when they are old."
—Pope Ven. John Paul I (1912-1978)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"The Lord is more anxious to forgive our sins than a woman is to carry her baby out of a burning building."
—St. Jean Vianney (1786-1859, feast day: 4 August)

The Rebel Black Dot! Song o' the Day: 40 Jahre!


The Aquabats!, "Playdough!" from The Return of the Aquabats! (Captain Thumbs Up!)

Skammentary:
"When I was a little man,
Playdough came in a little can,
I was
Star Wars' biggest fan,
Now I'm stuck without a plan!
G. I. Joe was an action man,
Shaggy drove the Mystery Van,
Devo was my favorite band,
Take me back to my happy land!…"

Thursday, July 25, 2019

The Rebel Black Dot Song o' This Auspicious Day


Dance Hall Crashers, "Old and Grey" from The Old Record (1989-1992) (The Last Angry Man)

Skammentary: There are indisputable similarities between "Old and Grey" & The Aquabats!' "Playdough!," both in theme & pop-cultural references.
"I remember when I used to be so young and so carefree,
Now my life is full of problems and responsibility,
Getting home by four to watch
Richie Rich and Scooby-Doo
Was all that ever worried me, it was all I had to do.
Looking at the older kids, always thought they were so great,
Saw them hanging out at parties, always got to stay out late,
By the time I reached that age the novelty had all but faded,
Now that we are old and grey we've become annoyed and dated…"

Saints + Scripture: Feast of Saint James

The Popish Plot
Theology Thursday: "Be a Catholic Nerd"

'Tis the Feast of Saint James, Apostle (died 44, the Greater, the Son of Zebedee, one of the two "Sons of Thunder;" originally Ya'qob, in Latin Iacobus, in English Jacob), martyred in the reign of the Roman emperor Claudius, at the command of the client tetrarch Herod Agrippa: Apostle-link ūnus, Apostle-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Apostles-link & Wikipedia-link Apostles.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Brother of St. John the Apostle [27 December].

Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
James is described as one of the first disciples to join Jesus. The Synoptic Gospels state that Jesus & John were with their father by the seashore when Jesus called them to follow Him. James was one of only three apostles whom Jesus selected to bear witness to His Transfiguration.
Wikipedia-link Synoptic Gospels


Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Feast of St. James
The Second Letter to the Corinthians, chapter four, verses seven thru fifteen;
Psalm One Hundred Twenty-six, verses one(b/c) & two(a/b), two(c/d) & three, four & five, & six;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter twenty, verses twenty thru twenty-eight.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, today in our Gospel the mother of James and John asks Jesus on their behalf for high places of authority in his kingdom. Ah, there is the voice of ambition. Some people don’t care at all about money or power or pleasure—but they care passionately about honor. A lot of people can identify with James and John. They want to go places; they want to be movers and shakers in society. Perhaps a number of people reading this reflection are filled with these emotions.

But Jesus turns the tables on them: "You do not know what you are asking." He is indeed a King, and he will indeed rule Israel, but his crown will be made of thorns, and his throne will be a Roman instrument of torture.

And so he tries to clarify: "Can you drink the chalice that I am going to drink?" The key to honor in the kingdom of God is to drink the cup of suffering, to be willing to suffer out of love, to give one’s life away as a gift. Look at the lives of the saints. It is not about aggrandizing the ego, but emptying it out.
Video reflection by Monsignor James Vlaun: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.



'Tis also the festival of Saint Christopher, Martyr (died circa 251, A.K.A. Offero), martyred in the reign of the Roman emperor Decius, a victim of the Decian Persecution; one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Persecutions-link & Wikipedia-link Persecution, & Helpers-link & Wikipedia-link Helpers.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Olympias of Constantinople, Deaconess (circa 361-408, A.K.A. the Younger; also spelt Olympiad): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Deaconess.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Glodesind of Metz, Abbess (died circa 608): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Rodolfo Acquaviva, Priest & Martyr, S.J. (1550-1583), martyred by Hindu rebels: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"The coming of the Holy Spirit does not take the Cross away from human reality. It is not a talisman that immunizes human life from sufferings & misfortunes."
—Pope St. Paul VI (1897-1978, feast day: 29 May)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Learn to love humility, for it will cover all your sins."
—St. Anthony of Padua, Doctor of the Church (1195-1231, feast day: 13 June)

Wednesday, July 24, 2019

The Explorers' Club, № DCC

Operation AXIOM: Destination Moon—The 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11, Part III
24 July 1969: The Command Module Columbia splashed down in the Pacific Ocean & was recovered by crewmen from the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Hornet; Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, & Michael Collins were placed in a Mobile Quarantine facility aboard the Hornet in which they met with incumbent U.S. president Richard Nixon; the astronauts & the Columbia remained quarantined for three weeks.






The Rebel Black Dot Moonshot Songs o' the Day
Phillip Phillips, "Home" from The World from This Side of the Moon (The Last Angry Man)
&
National Aeronautics & Space Administration, "Apollo 11 Excerpt 30" from The Apollo Missions (The Last Angry Man)

Saints + Scripture

'Tis the Optional Memorial of Saint Sharbel Makhlūf, Priest, O.L.M. (1828-1898, also spelt Charbel Makhlouf; A.K.A. Joseph Zaroun Makhlūf): Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
He was a Lebanese monk, born in a small mountain village & ordained in 1858. Devoted to the Blessed Virgin Mary, he spent the last twenty-three years of his life as a hermit. Despite temptations to wealth & comfort, Saint Sharbel taught the value of poverty, self-sacrifice, & prayer by the way he lived.
I visited the local Our Lady of Lebanon Maronite Catholic Church this past Sunday, 21 July, for their annual Mid-east Festival (great eats). In the Maronite Church, 21 July is St. Sharbel Makhlūf's feast day & I was fortunate enough to venerate the saint's relics on the altar.


'Tis also the festival of Saint Declán of Ardmore, Bishop (fifth century, also spelt Déaglán), founder of the monastery which gave rise to the town of Ardmore (Aird Mhór): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Aird Mhór.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Kinga of Poland, Abbess, O.S.C. (circa 1224-1292; A.K.A. Kunigunde, also spelt Cunegunda, etc.), Grand Duchess of Poland: Saint-link ūna, Saint-link duæ, & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Great-niece of St. Hedwig of Silesia [16 October], niece of Ss. Elizabeth of Hungary [17 November] & Agnes of Prague [2 March], sister of St. Margaret of Hungary [18 January] & Bl. Yolanda of Poland [11 June], & sister-in-law of Bl. Salomea of Poland [17 November].

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Louise of Savoy, Religious, O.S.C. (1461-1503): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Descendant of St. Elizabeth of Hungary [17 November] & so distant kin of St. Kinga of Poland [24 July], et al.; daughter of Bl. Amadeus of Savoy [30 March] & cousin of St. Joan of Valois [4 February].

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Joseph Lambton, Priest & Martyr (circa 1568-1592), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I, one of the Eighty-five Martyrs of England & Wales: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link England & Wales & Wikipedia-link England & Wales.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Wednesday of the Sixteenth Week in Ordinary Time
The Book of Exodus, chapter sixteen, verses one thru five & nine thru fifteen;
Psalm Seventh-eight, verses eighteen & nineteen, twenty-three & twenty-four, twenty-five & twenty-six, & twenty-seven & twenty-eight;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter thirteen, verses one thru nine.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, our Gospel for today is the parable of the sower and the seed. It has to do with the growth and development of the kingdom of God. We hear that Jesus "went out of the house and sat down by the sea" and that large crowds gathered around him. This is Jesus speaking to the whole world.

Sitting down, he is, again, in the attitude of the ancient teacher and judge, and he speaks the parable of the sower. The sower sows far and wide, some of the seed landing on the path, where the birds eat it up; some falling on rocky ground, where it is scorched in the sun; some sown among thorns, where the life is choked off; and some sown on rich soil, where it bears thirty, sixty, or a hundredfold.

Keep in mind that Jesus himself, in person, is the seed sown. Jesus is the Logos that wants to take root in us. This seed is sown far and wide, through all sorts of means, but in you, let the seed be sown deep, where it can’t be stolen, scorched, or choked.
Video reflection by Jem Sullivan, Ph.D.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Mass Readings—Optional Memorial of St. Sharbel Makhlūf
The Book of Sirach, chapter three, verses seventeen thru twenty-four;
Psalm Fifteen, verses two & three(a/b), three(c/d) & four(a/b), & five;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter nineteen, verses twenty-seven, twenty-eight, & twenty-nine.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Strong in faith,put upa good fight; the future belongs to the believers & not to the skeptics & doubters. The future belongs to those who love, not to those who hate. The Church's mission in the world, far from having ended or outmoded, goes out to meet new trials & fresh enterprises."
—Pope Ven. Pius XII (1876-1958)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"The poor & the sick are the heart of God. In serving them, we serve Jesus Christ."
—St. Camillus de Lellis (1551-1614, feast day: 14 July)

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

The Rebel Black Dot Moonshot Songs o' the Day


Operation AXIOM: The 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11
The Phenomenauts, "Fly through the Sky" from the Electric Sheep E.P. (The Last Angry Man)
&
National Aeronautics & Space Administration, "Apollo 11 Excerpt 29" from The Apollo Missions (The Last Angry Man)

Saints + Scripture

'Tis the Optional Memorial of Saint Bridget, Religious, O.Ss.S. (circa 1303-1373, of Sweden, of Vadstena; A.K.A. Birgitta Birgersdotter), foundress of the Bridgettines (O.Ss.S.), formally the Order of the Most Holy Savior: Saint-link ūna, Saint-link duæ, & Wikipedia-link; Order-link O.Ss.S. & Wikipedia-link O.Ss.S..


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Kinswoman of St. Ingrid of Skänninge [2 September] & mother of St. Catherine of Sweden [24 March].

Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
All her life, Bridget had marvelous visions & received special messages from God. In obedience to them, she visited many rulers & important people* in the Church. She explained humbly what God expected of them.
*Methinks "important people in the Church" is poor diction. Are only high ranking clerics important in the Church? The Apostle Paul makes clear that every part of the Body of Christ plays its unique & vital part. "Prominent persons in the Church" would have been better.


'Tis also the festival of Saint Phocas the Gardener, Martyr (died circa 303, of Sinope), martyred in the reign of the Roman emperors Diocletian & Maximian, a victim of the Great Persecution: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Persecution.

'Tis also the festival of Saint John Cassian, Deacon (circa 360-435, A.K.A. the Ascetic, the Roman), founder of the Abbey of Saint Victor: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Abbey.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Krystyn Gondek, Priest & Martyr, O.F.M. (1909-1942, A.K.A. Wojciech Gondek), martyred in the reign of the Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler, one of the One Hundred Eight Blessed Polish Martyrs: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link (List, № 47); Martyrs-link Polska & Wikipedia-link Polska.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Basil Hopko, Bishop & Martyr (1904-1976, also spelt Vasil'), martyred in the reign of the Communist dictator Gustáv Husák: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Tuesday of the Sixteenth Week in Ordinary Time
The Book of Exodus, chapter fourteen, verse twenty-one thru chapter fifteen, verse one;
The Book of Exodus, chapter fifteen, verses eight & nine, ten & twelve, & seventeen;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter twelve, verses forty-six thru fifty.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel someone tells Jesus, "Your mother and your brothers are standing outside, asking to speak with you." Jesus stretches his hand toward his disciples and says, "Here are my mother and my brothers. For whoever does the will of my heavenly Father is my brother, and sister, and mother."

Family is wonderful. There is nothing in the world wrong with fostering the flourishing of your family. But over and again, the Bible places the goods of the world into question—even something as good as family relationships.

Why? Because family isn’t God. It is not that which you should serve with your whole heart; it doesn’t belong in the center of your life.

Is family the point around which most of your energies revolve? Is it your primary focus as you make your way through the day? Are there times when you feel your family obligations competing with the will of God?

Then remember Jesus’ words: "Who is my mother? Who are my brothers?… Whoever does the will of my heavenly Father.
Video reflection by Father Greg Friedman, O.F.M.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Mass Readings—Optional Memorial of St. Bridgit
The Letter to the Galatians, chapter two, verses nineteen & twenty;
Psalm Thirty-four, verses two & three, four & five, six & seven, eight & nine, & ten & eleven;
The Gospel according to John, chapter fifteen, verses one thru eight.

Saint Quote o' the Day
"We put pride into everything like salt. We like to see that our good works are known. If our virtues are seen, we are pleased; if our faults are perceived,we are sad. I remark that in a great many people; if one says anything to them, it disturbs them, it annoys them. The saints were not like that—they were vexed if their virtues were known, & pleased that their imperfections should be seen."
—St. Jean Vianney (1786-1859, feast day: 4 August)
Papal Quote o' the Day
"Wisdom is a sharing in God's way of seeing reality."
—Pope Benedict XVI (born 1927, reigned 2005-2013)

Monday, July 22, 2019

The Rebel Black Dot Moonshot Songs o' the Day


Operation AXIOM: The 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11
MxPx, "Major Tom (Coming Home)" from On the Cover II (The Last Angry Man)
&
National Aeronautics & Space Administration, "Apollo 11 Excerpt 26" from The Apollo Missions (The Last Angry Man)

Saints + Scripture: Feast of St. Mary Magdalene

'Tis the Feast of Saint Mary Magdalene (died circa 63, the "Apostle to the Apostles"): Magdalene-link ūna, Magdalene-link duæ, Magdalene-link Array of Hope, & Wikipedia-link.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
Mary Magdalene was a Jewish woman who, according to the four canonical gospels, traveled with Jesus as one of His followers & was a witness to His Crucifixion, burial, & Resurrection.
Quoth St. Thérèse of the Child Jesus & the Holy Face, O.C.D., Virgin & Doctor of the Church:
"Most of all I imitate the behavior of Mary Magdalene, for her amazing—or, rather, loving—audacity which delighted the heart of Jesus, has cast its spell upon mine."
Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Feast of St. Mary Magdalene
The Song of Songs, chapter three, verses one thru four(b);
or, the Second Letter to the Corinthians, chapter five, verses fourteen thru seventeen;
Psalm Sixty-three, verses two, three & four, five & six, & eight & nine;
The Gospel according to John, chapter twenty, verses one, two, & eleven thru eighteen.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, today we celebrate the feast of St. Mary Magdalene. Our Gospel says that Mary came to the Lord’s tomb early in the morning on the first day of the week.

Let’s place ourselves there: it is still dark—just the way it was at the beginning of time, before God said, "Let there be light." But a light is about to shine, and a new creation is about to appear.

The stone had been rolled away. The stone, blocking entrance to the tomb of Jesus, stands for the finality of death. When someone that we love dies, it is as though a great stone is rolled across them, permanently blocking our access to them. And this is why we weep at death—not just in grief but in a kind of existential frustration.

Undoubtedly, Mary Magdalene thought that a grave robber had been at work. The wonderful Johannine irony is that the greatest of grave robbers
had indeed been at work.

In the book of prophet Ezekiel, we hear this: "I will open your graves and have you rise from them." What was dreamed about, what endured as a hope against hope, has become a reality. God has opened the grave of his Son.
Video reflection by Monsignor James Vlaun: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Joseph of Palestine (circa 285-356, A.K.A. of Tiberias), who built the Church of the Multiplication of the Loaves & Fish & opposed the Arian heresy: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Church, Heresy-link Arianism, & Wikipedia-link Arianism.

'Tis also the festival of Saint Gerolamo of Pavia, Bishop (died 787, Anglicized as Jerome), Bishop of Pavia: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Pavia.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Benno of Osnabrück, Bishop, O.S.B. (circa 1020-1088), nineteenth (XIX) Bishop of Osnabrück, founder of the Abbey at Schloss Iburg: Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Osnabrück & Wikipedia-link Abbey.

'Tis also the festival of Blessed Augustine Fangi, Priest, O.P. (1430-1493, of Biella): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the festival of Saints Philip Evans, S.J., & John Lloyd, Priests & Martyrs (died 1679), martyred in the reign of the Anglo-Scottish king Charles II, victims of the perjeror Titus Oates's "Popish Plot" hoax; two of the Forty Martyrs of England & Wales: Martyr-link Papa Echo, Martyr-link Juliett Lima, & Wikipedia-link; Plot-link & Wikipedia-link Plot, Martyrs-link England & Wales & Wikipedia-link England & Wales.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Someone would have a poor idea of human & marital love by thinking that affection & joy vanish when difficulties come. This is when we really see what motivates people. Here also is where gift & tenderness are consolidated, because true love does not think about itself, but about how to increase the good of the beloved."
—Pope St.John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, feast day: 22 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"I have no taste for corruptible food nor for the pleasures of this life. I desire the break of God, which is the Flesh of Jesus Christ, who was of the seed of David; & for drink I desire His Blood, which is love incorruptible."
—St. Ignatius of Antioch (50-108, feast day: 17 October)

Sunday, July 21, 2019

The Rebel Black Dot Moonshot Songs o' the Day


Operation AXIOM: The 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11
Glenn Miller, "Moonlight Serenade" from Glenn Miller's 50 Finest (The Last Angry Man)
&
National Aeronautics & Space Administration, "Apollo 11 Excerpt 21" from The Apollo Missions (The Last Angry Man)

Commentary:
"We came in peace for all Mankind."

Bonus! Song o' the Lord's Day

Sarah Kroger, "O God Beyond All Praising" from Origin (A Beauty Initiative within F.O.C.U.S.) (The Last Angry Man)

Saints + Scripture: XVI Sunday in Tempus per annum

'Tis the Sixteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time (Tempus per annum, "time during the year"): Wikipedia-link.

Scripture of the Week
Mass Readings—Sixteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time
The Book of Genesis, chapter eighteen, verses one thru ten(a);
Psalm Fifteen, verses two & three, three & four, & five;
The Letter to the Colossians, chapter one, verses twenty-four thru twenty-eight;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter ten, verses thirty-eight thru forty-two.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, today’s Gospel inspires protests more than almost any other that I’ve preached on. “Hey Bishop, I think Martha gets a bum rap.” And for centuries the story has been read that Martha represents the “active” life and Mary the “contemplative” life. I would like to stress that the active/contemplative reading of the Martha and Mary story is not that helpful. We have to dig a little deeper.

What does he upbraid Martha for? “Martha, Martha, you are anxious and upset about many things.” It is the frantic, divided, unfocused quality of her life that Jesus is drawing attention to. And what is Mary being praised for? Not precisely that she is “contemplative,” but that she has chosen the
unum necessarium (the one necessary thing). She sits quietly at the feet of the Lord, not so much eschewing work as gathering herself, learning what she is essentially about.

There is a cacophony of voices calling out to you; there are a thousand influences pulling you this way and that. What’s the one necessary thing? It is to listen to the voice of Jesus as he tells you of his love and as he tells you who you are.
Video reflection by Father Greg Friedman, O.F.M.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Video reflection by Father Claude Burns (uCatholic): Weekend Reflection with Father Pontifex.

Audio reflection by Scott Hahn, Ph.D. (St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology): Breaking the Bread.


Scripture Study—Day 91: Covenant Crag, Day 35
The Book of Genesis, chapter twenty-five, verses seven thru eleven.

Commentary: The Death of Abraham (Genesis, 25:7-11).

Mass Journal: Week 34
Reflection by Matthew Kelly, founder of the Dynamic Catholic Institute:
The philosophy of Christ is based on discipline, & it is discipline that our modern culture abhors & had rejected with all its strength. It is true that Jesus came to comfort the afflicted, but as [Servant of God] Dorothy Day [Obl.S.B.], journalist, social, activist, & Catholic convert pointed out, he also came to afflict the comfortable. The saints make many modern Catholics uncomfortable because they challenge us to throw off the spirit of the world & to embrace the Spirit of God. Like Jesus, by their example the saints invite us to a life of discipline. Contrary to popular opinion, discipline doesn't stifle or restrict the human person. Discipline isn't something invented by the Church to control or manipulate the masses, nor is it the tool that unjust tyrants & dictators use to make people do things they don't want to do. All these are the lies of a culture completely absorbed in a philosophy of instant gratification. Discipline is the faithful friend who will introduce you to your true self. Discipline is the worthy protector who will defend you from your lesser self. And discipline is the extraordinary mentor who will challenge you to become the best-version-of-yourself & all God created you to be. What are your habits? Are your habits helping you become a-better-version-of-yourself or are they self-diminishing?


Otherwise, 21 July would be the festival of Saint Práxedes, Virgin (died circa 165, of Rome; also spelt Praxedis, Praxed): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Wayback Machine. Daughter of Ss. Pudens [19 May] & Claudia [7 August] & sister of Ss. Prudentia [19 May], Novatus [20 June], & Timotheus [?].

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Simeon the Holy Fool, Hermit (died circa 570, A.K.A. the Insane, Simeon Salus, Simeon Solos): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Arbogast of Strasbourg, Bishop (died circa 678, A.K.A. Arascach), sixth (VI) Bishop of Strasbourg: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Diocese-link Strasbourg, Wikipedia-link Strasbourg, & Wikipedia-link Prince-Bishops.

'Twould also be the festival of Saint Lawrence of Brindisi, Priest & Doctor of the Church, O.F.M. Cap. (1559-1619, A.K.A. Giulio Cesare Russo): Doctor-link ūnus, Doctor-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Doctors-link, & Wikipedia-link Doctors.


'Twould also be the festival of Saint Alberico Crescitelli, Priest & Martyr, P.I.M.E. (1863-1900, A.K.A. Guo Xide), martyred in the reign of the Chinese Guangxu Emperor, a victim of the Boxer Rebellion, one of the one hundred twenty Martyr Saints of China: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Boxer Rebellion, Martyrs-link China, & Wikipedia-link China.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Christians must restore their spiritual & moral unity. It is not enough to say we are Christians. We must live as Christians. Genuine Christians derive the rule, style, & strength of their life from the Faith."
—Pope St. Paul VI (1897-1978, feast day: 29 May)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"The sacraments of the New Testament give salvation, the sacraments of the Old Testament promise a savior."
—St. Augustine of Hippo, Doctor of the Church (354-430, feast day: 28 August)