Saturday, March 30, 2019

Saints + Scripture: Quadragesima

The Popish Plot
vLent 2019: "Bible Bites for March 30th, 2019"


Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Saturday of the Third Week of Lent
The Book of Hosea, chapter six, verses one thru six;
Psalm Fifty-one, verses three & four, eighteen & nineteen, & twenty & twenty-one(a/b);
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter eighteen, verses nine thru fourteen.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, today Jesus tells us of the Pharisee and the tax collector—so, a stereotypically righteous person and unrighteous person—who both enter the Temple to pray. But what a world of difference in their manner of praying!

The entire point of religion is to make us humble before God and to open us to the path of love. Everything else is more or less a footnote. Liturgy, prayer, the precepts of the Church, the Commandments, sacraments, sacramentals—all of it—are finally meant to conform us to the way of love. When they instead turn us away from that path, they have been undermined.

Both St. Paul and the Gospel writers—as well as Jesus himself, of course—are intensely aware of this danger. This is precisely why Paul speaks of the dangers of the law. He knew that people often use the law as a weapon of aggression: since I know what is right and wrong in some detail, then I am uniquely positioned to point out your flaws. And when I point out your flaws, I elevate myself. In short, the law, which is a gift from God, has been co-opted for the purposes of the ego.

Reflect: How can pride stand in the way of love? Why does true humility encourage love?
Video reflection by Father Bill Quinlivan: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 69
The Book of Exodus, chapter thirty, verses one thru ten.

Commentary: The Altar of Incense (Exodus, 30:1-10).

'Tis the commemoration of Saint John Climacus, Abbot (circa 579-649; A.K.A. John Scholasticus, John Sinaites), author of The Ladder of Divine Ascent: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Ladder.

Commentary: Wayback Machine. "Climacus" is St. John's epithet, meaning "of the ladder."

'Tis also the commemoration of Saint Peter de Regalado, Priest, O.F.M. Conv. (1390-1456, also spelt Peter Regalatus): Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the commemoration of Blessed Amadeus of Savoy (435-1472, A.K.A. Duke Amadeus IX "the Happy" of Savoy): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the commemoration of Saint Ludovico of Casoria, Priest, O.F.M. (1814-1885, A.K.A. Arcangelo Palmentieri), founder of the defunct Gray Friars of Charity & the enduring Gray Sisters of Saint Elizabeth: Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the commemoration of Blessed Mary Restituta Kafka, Virgin & Martyr (1894-1943, A.K.A. Helena Kafková), martyred in the reign of the Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Above all it is my conviction that all work is a fundamental dimension of human existence on the earth. This is true of all work—from the simplest to the most difficult, from the less paying to the most rewarding."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, feast day: 22 October)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"I thirst after Heaven, that blessed abode where our love for Jesus will be without bounds."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"The one who has put on the faith of the Cross despises even what is naturally fearful, & for Christ's sake is not afraid of death."
—St. Athanasius, Doctor of the Church (296-373, feast day: 2 May)

Friday, March 29, 2019

Saints + Scripture: Quadragesima

Simplex Edition | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

The Popish Plot
vLent 2019: "Catholic T-Shirt Club Unboxing 6"


Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Friday of the Third Week of Lent
The Book of Hosea, chapter fourteen, verses two thru ten;
Psalm Eighty-one, verses six(c) & eight(a), eight(b/c) & nine, ten & eleven(a/b), & fourteen & seventeen;
The Gospel according to Mark, chapter twelve, verses twenty-eight thru thirty-four.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, our Gospel for today features the Word of God himself telling us what stands at the heart of the law. A scribe posed, as a kind of game, the following question: "Which is the first of all the commandments?" There were hundreds of laws in the Jewish system. So it was a favorite exercise of the rabbis to seek out the single rule that somehow clarified the whole of the law.

So Jesus gives his famous answer: "You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, with all your mind, and with all your strength. The second is this: You shall love your neighbor as yourself."

What does that mean? The law is finally about love, and the love of God and neighbor are inextricably bound to one another. If we love God but hate our neighbors, we’re wasting our time.

Why are the two loves so tightly connected? Because of who Jesus is. Jesus is not just a human being, and he is not just God. He is the God-man, the one in whom divinity and humanity come together. Therefore, it’s impossible to love him as God without loving the humanity that he’s created and embraced.

Reflect: What restrictions, if any, do you put on your love for God or for neighbor?
Video reflection by Lucia Luzondo, J.D.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 68
The Book of Exodus, chapter twenty-nine, verses thirty-eight thru forty-six.

Commentary: The Daily Offerings (Exodus, 29:38-46).

Thursday, March 28, 2019

Saints + Scripture: Quadragesima

Simplex Edition | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

The Popish Plot
vLent 2019: "Final Four 2019: Heaven"


Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Thursday of the Third Week of Lent
The Book of Jeremiah, chapter seven, verses twenty-three thru twenty-eight;
Psalm Ninety-five, verses one & two, six & seven, & eight & nine;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter eleven, verses fourteen thru twenty-three.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel we learn of a person possessed by a demon. Jesus meets the man and drives out the demon, but then is immediately accused of being in league with Satan. Some of the witnesses said, "By the power of Beelzebul, the prince of demons, he drives out demons."

Jesus’ response is wonderful in its logic and laconicism: "Every kingdom divided against itself will be laid waste and house will fall against house. And if Satan is divided against himself, how will his kingdom stand?"

The demonic power is always one of scattering. It breaks up communion. But Jesus, as always, is the voice of
communio, of one bringing things back together.

Think back to Jesus’ feeding of the five thousand. Facing a large, hungry crowd, his disciples beg him to "dismiss the crowds so that they can go to the villages and buy food for themselves." But Jesus answers, "There is no need for them to go away; give them some food yourselves."

Whatever drives the Church apart is an echo of this "dismiss the crowds" impulse, and a reminder of the demonic tendency to divide. In times of trial and threat, this is a very common instinct. We blame, attack, break up, and disperse. But Jesus is right: "There is no need for them to go away."

Reflect: How can you be a force for unification in your parish or Christian group?
Video reflection by Father Roger Lopez, O.F.M.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 67
The Book of Exodus, chapter twenty-nine, verses one thru nine.

Commentary: The Ordination of Priests (Exodus, 29:1-9).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"The ultimate goal of fasting is to help each one of us to make a complete gift of self to God."
—Pope Benedict XVI (born 1927, reigned 2005-2013)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"God alone can sound the heart!"
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"As Lent is the time for greater love, listen to Jesus's thirst. He knows your weakness. He wants only your love, wants only the chance to love you."
—St. Teresa of Calcutta (1910-1997, feast day: 5 September)

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Operation ÖSTERREICH: Exodus 90, Day 66

Weekly Wednesday Weigh-in
Last weigh-in: 314.6 lbs
This weigh-in: 313.8 lbs.
Difference: -0.8 lbs.

After a fortnight of high-flying success, a thud back to earth was rather expected; so, still to have lost at least a nominal amount of weight must be accounted a victory. Back to work, lads, the three-hundred-pound barrier, once considered fanciful at best, is within striking distance!


Project GLOWWORM
We are in unprecedented territory, with my belts pulled tighter than ever before. I tried to wear one of my suits on Monday, but found that the pants, which sit around the midsection—as suit pants ought—instead of around the waist—as with jeans & separate slacks—floating around me like clown pants. So, I did the best I could, pairing the pin-striped blue coat with a pair of similarly (but not identically) dark blue slacks. This is a most welcome problem.

Bonus! Lied von ÖSTERREICH
"Weird Al" Yankovic, "First World Problems" from Mandatory Fun (The Last Angry Exodus Man)

Saints + Scripture: Quadragesima

The Popish Plot
vLent 2019: "Mike's Story: Practicing Catholic"


Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Wednesday of the Third Week of Lent
The Book of Deuteronomy, chapter four, verses one & five thru nine;
Psalm One Hundred Forty-seven, verses twelve & thirteen, fifteen & sixteen, & nineteen & twenty;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter five, verses seventeen, eighteen, & nineteen.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in our Gospel today, Jesus declares that he would not undermine the law and the prophets but fulfill them. Jesus himself was an observant Jew, and the themes and images of the Holy Scriptures were elemental for him.

But what is he going to fulfill? Protestant theologian N.T. Wright has pointed out that the Old Testament is essentially an unfinished symphony, a drama without a climax. It is the articulation of a hope, a dream, a longing—but without a realization of that hope, without a satisfaction of that longing.

Israel knew itself to be the people with the definite mission to become holy and thereby to render the world holy. But instead, Israel fell into greater and greater sins, and instead of being the catalyst for the conversion of the world, the world was continually overwhelming and enslaving Israel.

And then came Jesus, who turned out to be, in the most unexpected way, the fulfillment of the dream. From the beginning of his ministry, Jesus effected the gathering of the tribes of Israel through conversion and the forgiveness of sins.

Reflect: Have you ever asked Jesus to fulfill one of your dreams? Why or why not?
Video reflection by Jem Sullivan, Ph.D.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 66
The Book of Exodus, chapter twenty-eight, verses one thru four, thirty-six, thirty-seven, & thirty-eight.

Commentary: Holy Garments for the Priests (Exodus, 28:1-4) & Other Priestly Garments (Exodus, 28:36-38).

'Tis the commemoration of Saint Ruprecht of Salzburg, Bishop & Abbot, O.S.B. (circa 660-718; Anglicized as Rupert; A.K.A. Robert, Hrodbert, etc.; A.K.A. of Worms), founding abbot of Saint Peter's Abbey, founder of Nonnberg Abbey & Salzburg Cathedral, Bishop of Salzburg, & Bishop of Worms: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link St. Peter's, Wikipedia-link Nonnberg, Wikipedia-link Cathedral, Diocese-link Salzburg & Wikipedia-link Salzburg, & Wikipedia-link Worms.

Commentary: Wayback Machine. Uncle of the virgin St. Erentude [30 June].

'Tis also the commemoration of Blessed Haymo of Halberstadt, Bishop, O.S.B. (died 853, also spelt Haimo, Aimone): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Halberstadt.

'Tis also the commemoration of Blessed Frowin of Engelberg, Abbot, O.S.B. (died 1178, also spelt Frodowin), abbot of Engelberg Abbey: Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Engelberg.

'Tis also the commemoration of Blessed Francesco Faà di Bruno, Priest (1825-1888), founder of the Minim Sisters of Saint Zita: Blessed-link ūnus, Blessed-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link (in lingua italiano).

Commentary: As a mathematician, Bl. Francesco is best known for Faà di Bruno's Formula, the meaning & purpose of which I won't even pretend to understand: Wikipedia-link Formula

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Lent comes providentially to reawaken us, to shake us from our lethargy."
—Pope Francis (born 1936, reigning since 2013)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"My life is but an instant, an hour that passes by."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Have patience with all things, but first of all with yourself."
—St. Francis de Sales (1567-1622, feast day: 24 January)

Tuesday, March 26, 2019

The Explorers' Club, № DCLXXIX

Operation AXIOM: After the World War
23 March 1919: Italian Fascism was founded—Benito Mussolini renamed his consolidation of several fasci groups the Italian Fasci of Combat (Fasci Italiani di Combattimento) & declared his movement's principles at a rally in Milan's Piazza San Sepolcro, later published in Il Popolo d'Italia, Mussolini's newspaper; the proto-Fascist "Third Position" opposed both Communism/Socialism & capitalism.




Lest we forget.

Saints + Scripture: Quadragesima

The Popish Plot
vLent 2019: "Top 10 Catholic Podcasts, Part 1"


Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Tuesday of the Third Week of Lent
The Book of Daniel, chapter three, verses twenty-five & thirty-four thru forty-three;
Psalm Twenty-five, verses four & five(a/b), six & seven(b/c), & eight & nine;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter eighteen, verses twenty-one thru thirty-five.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, today’s Gospel gives us the parable of the unforgiving servant, which reveals what is at the root of our inability to forgive.

In the deepest sense, we don’t belong to ourselves. Everything we have and all that we are comes from God. We are meant, with all of our gifts, to serve God’s purposes. Our very existence comes from God, but so does the forgiveness of our sins. Through no merit of ours, Christ has died for our sins and offered us the divine mercy. The upshot is this: there is nothing particularly stable about the self, nothing that it can claim for its own. All that it has is received as a gift.

Well, the incapacity to forgive comes from one place: a false sense of the substantial self. If my life belongs to me, then I will cling to resentment, anger, and self-righteousness when my dignity has been compromised. But when we realize that our life is not about us—when we put our forgiveness of others in relation to God’s forgiveness of us—then we find that real forgiveness is possible.

Reflect: How easy or difficult is it for you to forgive others? How often do you link your need to forgive to the way God has forgiven you?
Video reflection by Father Greg Friedman, O.F.M.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 65
The Book of Exodus, chapter twenty-seven, verses nine, ten, & seventeen thru twenty-one.

Commentary: The Court & Its Hangings (Exodus, 27:9-10, 17-19) & The Oil for the Lamps (Exodus, 27:20-21).

'Tis the commemoration of Saint Felix of Trier, Bishop (died circa 399), Bishop of Trier: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Diocese-link & Wikipedia-link Trier.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Tis also the commemoration of Saint Govan, Hermit (circa 500-586, also spelt Cofen, etc.): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the commemoration of Saint Bercharius, Abbot & Martyr, O.S.B. (636-696, A.K.A. Bererus), founding abbot of both the Abbey of Saint Peter, Hautvillers & the Abbey of Montier-en-Der, martyred by the disgruntled monk Daguin: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Hautvillers & Wikipedia-link Montier-en-Der.

'Tis also the commemoration of Saint Ludger of Utrecht, Bishop & Abbot (circa 743-809, the "Apostle of Saxony;" A.K.A. of Münster, also spelt Lüdiger), founder of the Abbey of Werden & the Abbey of St. Ludger's, & inaugural Bishop of Münster: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Werden, Wikipedia-link St. Ludger's, & Wikipedia-link Münster.

'Tis also the commemoration of Blessed Maddalena Caterina Morano, Religious, F.M.A. (1847-1908): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Do not seek to be numbered among the learned & clever whose numbers seem destined by the combination of circumstances to increase. Be truly poor, meek, eager to holiness, merciful, pure of heart. Be among those who bring to the world the peace of God."
—Pope St. Paul VI (1897-1978, feast day: 26 September)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"How powerless I am to express in human language the secrets of heaven."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"[Christ] has destroyed death. For this reason he came down to earth, that by pursuing death he might kill the rebel that slew us."
—St. Alexander of Alexandria (died 328, feast day: 17 April)

Monday, March 25, 2019

Saints + Scripture: The Annunciation of the Lord

The Popish Plot
vLent 2019: "Memento Mori: Anima Christi"

'Tis the Solemnity of the Annunciation of the Lord: Annunciation-link ūnus, Annunciation-link duo, Wikipedia-link Annunciation, & Wikipedia-link Feast.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
This is the Catholic celebration of the announcement by the Archangel Gabriel to the Blessed Virgin Mary that she would conceive & become the mother of Jesus,the Son of God, marking His Incarnation.
Quoth
Minute Meditations from the Popes:
Lord Jesus, as Your dear Mother Mary gave her "fiat" when she responded, "Let it be done to me according to Your word" (Luke, 1:38), so too may I learn to cooperate with God's will.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Solemnity of the Annunciation of the Lord
The Book of Isaiah, chapter seven, verses ten thru fourteen & chapter eight, verse ten;
Psalm Forty, verses seven & eight(a), eight(b) & nine, ten, & eleven;
The Letter to the Hebrews, chapter ten, verses four thru ten;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter one, verses twenty-six thru thirty-eight.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel of Luke, we find the Annunciation to Mary. Here is what Gabriel said to the Virgin: “Thou shalt conceive in thy womb and bring forth a son, and shalt call his name Jesus…. The Lord God shall give unto him the throne of his father David, and he shall reign over the house of Jacob forever; and of his kingdom there shall be no end.”

No first-century Israelite would have missed the meaning here: this child shall be the fulfillment of the promise made to King David.

And this means that the child is, in fact, the king of the world, the one who would bring unity and peace to the nations. The conviction grew upon Israel that this mysterious descendant of David would be king—not just for a time and not just in an earthly sense, but forever and for all nations. This definitive king of the Jews would be king of the world. He would be our king, as well.

Reflect: Put yourself in Mary’s place at the Annunciation and write down a few feelings and thoughts you would have had. Why was Mary able to clearly and firmly say “yes” to God’s request
Video reflection by Monsignor James Vlaun: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 64
The Book of Exodus, chapter twenty-seven, verses one thru eight.

Commentary: The Altar of Burnt Offering (Exodus, 27:1-8).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"The Divine is united to the human. The invisible has become visible. The infinite has assumed a human form. Humanity has been accepted into the unity of the Divine Person of the Word."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, feast day: 22 October)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"It is true that Our Lady is Queen of Heaven & earth, but at the same time she is more Mother than Queen."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Our Blessed Lord said the word is the seed, the seed is the word. Man gives the seed. The woman receives the seed, fosters it, nourishes it, gives birth to it, loves it, trains it. There's no such thing as inferiority or superiority. Instead of being a question of inferiority and superiority, it is only a question of the different roles that we play—the man is the symbol of Christ, & the woman is the symbol of the Church. Many people no longer have an understanding of the Church as the Body of Christ. Jesus loves His Body. So when we forget the Church & begin to call her an institution, an establishment, the whole character of the nuptial bond is disrupted. The Blessed Mother beneath the cross is the symbol of the Church, & John is the firstborn. At Pentecost we find that the Body has grown: here are one hundred twenty, with the apostles, Mary in the midst of them."
—Venerable Fulton J. Sheen (1895-1979)

Saturday, March 23, 2019

Saints + Scripture: Quadragesima

The Popish Plot
vLent 2019: "Bible Bites for 23 March 2019"


Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Saturday of the Second Week of Lent
The Book of Micah, chapter seven, verses fourteen, fifteen, eighteen, nineteen, & twenty;
Psalm One Hundred Three, verses one & two, three & four, nine & ten, & eleven & twelve;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter fifteen, verses one, two, three, & eleven thru thirty-two.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, our Gospel today is Jesus’ best-known parable: the story of the prodigal son.

In considering this narrative, we are dealing with an icon of the Father told by the one who is himself the Icon of the Father. Thus we have Jesus indirectly crafting a subtle self-portrait. The gathering embrace of the father in the story mirrors that of the heavenly Father, which in turn is represented in that of Jesus.

What happens when the father embraces his son and kisses him? The boy speaks: "Father, I have sinned against heaven and against you; I no longer deserve to be called your son." Whenever characters in the Bible come close to the divine grace, they experience a heightened sense of their own unworthiness. This is the dynamic at work in the case of the prodigal son.

But his father ignores his carefully rehearsed speech, and, with an eagerness bordering on impatience, instructs his servants to prepare a celebration. Our participation in the flow of the divine life is, necessarily, a gift. It cannot, in principle, be earned or merited, but only accepted. We can only be embraced by it.

Reflect: Who do you identify most with in the parable of the prodigal son? What can you learn from that identification?
Video reflection by Father Luke Ballman: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Mass Readings—Optional Memorial of St. Turibius of Mogrovejo
The Second Letter to Timothy, chapter one, verses thirteen & fourteen & chapter two, verses one, two, & three;
Psalm Ninety-six, verses one & two(a), two(b) & three, seven & eight(c), & ten;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter nine, verses thirty-five thru thirty-eight.

Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 62
The Book of Exodus, chapter twenty-six, verses fifteen thru thirty.

Commentary: The Framework (Exodus, 26:15-30).

'Tis the Optional Memorial of Saint Turibius of Mogrovejo, Bishop (1538-1606), third (III) Archbishop of Lima: Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Lima.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
He served as the Archbishop of Lima from 1579 until his death. He first studied in the humanities & law before serving as a professor & later as the Grand Inquisitor at the behest of King Philip II.
'Tis also the commemoration of Saint Æthelwold of Farne, Priest, O.S.B. (died circa 699; A.K.A. the Hermit; also spelt Ethelwald, Oidilwald): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the commemoration of Blessed Edmund Sykes, Priest & Martyr (circa 1550-1587), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I, one of the Eighty-five Martyrs of England & Wales: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link England & Wales & Wikipedia-link England & Wales.

'Tis also the commemoration of Blessed Peter O'Higgins, Priest & Martyr, O.P. (1601-1642, also spelt Peadar Ó Huiggin), martyred in the reign of the English king Charles I, one of the Irish Martyrs: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link (List); Martyrs-link Éire & Wikipedia-link Éire.

'Tis also the commemoration of Saint José Orioli, Priest (1650-1702, the "Wonder-worker of Barcelona;" Anglicized as Joseph Oriol): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Because all are entrusted with the vast area of charity & material assistance, I invite you to give generously. Give for the maintenance & support of seminarians, for the formation of the laity, in particular of catechists, for the construction of churches, schools, hospitals, & social work."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, feast day: 22 October)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"To be His, one must remain little, little like a drop of dew!… Oh! how few are the souls who aspire to remain little in this way!"
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Practice & increase in virtue up to the very moment of death."
—St. Bonaventure, Doctor of the Church (1221-1274, feast day: 15 July)

Friday, March 22, 2019

Saints + Scripture: Quadragesima — Complex Editions

Commentary: I've complicated this week's erstwhile "Simplex Editions." I rue that my duties to the Knights of Columbus fish fry continue to interfere with "Saints + Scripture."

Wayback Machine—Wednesday, 20 March

Wayback Machine—Thursday, 21 March

Saints + Scripture: Quadragesima

The Popish Plot
vLent 2019: "Indulgences: Still a Thing!"


Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Friday of the Second Week of Lent
The Book of Genesis, chapter thirty-seven, verses three, four, twelve, thirteen(a), & seventeen thru twenty-eight(a);
Psalm One Hundred Five, verses sixteen & seventeen, eighteen & nineteen, & twenty & twenty-one;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter twenty-one, verses thirty-three thru forty-three, forty-five, & forty-six.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, just before his Passion, Jesus tells the striking story that is our Gospel for today. The fertile vineyard stands for Israel, his chosen people. But it could be broadened out to include the world. What do we learn from this beautiful image? That God has made for his people a place where they can find rest, enjoyment, good work.

We—Israel, the Church, the world—are not the owners of this vineyard; we are tenants. One of the most fundamental spiritual mistakes we can make is to think that we own the world. We are tenants, entrusted with the responsibility of caring for it, but everything that we have and are is on loan. Our lives are not about us.

Christ is God’s judgment. We are all under his judgment. In the measure that we kill him, refuse to listen to him, we place our tenancy in jeopardy. And so the great question that arises from this reading: "How am I using the gifts that God gave me for God’s purposes? My money? My time? My talents? My creativity? My relationships?" All is for God, and thus all is under God’s judgment.

Reflect: How are you using the gifts that God gave you for God’s purposes?
Video reflection by Jem Sullivan, Ph.D.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 61
The Book of Exodus, chapter twenty-six, verses one thru fourteen.

Commentary: The Tabernacle (Exodus, 26:1-14).

'Tis the commemoration of Saint Paul of Narbonne, Bishop (died circa 250, one of the "Apostles to the Gauls"): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Tis also the commemoration of Saint Avitus of Périgord, Hermit (died circa 570): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the commemoration of Saint Nicholas Owen, Martyr, S.J. (circa 1562-1606, A.K.A. John Owen, "Little John"), martyred in the reign of the Anglo-Scottish king James VI & I, in the aftermath of the Gunpowder Plot; one of the Forty Martyrs of England & Wales, the realm's foremost constructor of priest holes: Martyr-link ūnus, Martyr-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Gunpowder Plot & Wikipedia-link Priest Hole; & Martyrs-link England & Wales & Wikipedia-link England & Wales.

'Tis also the commemoration of Blessed Marian Górecki, Priest & Martyr (1903-1940), martyred in the reign of the Nazi dictator Adolf Hitler, one of the One Hundred Eight Blessed Polish Martyrs: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link (List, № 53); Martyrs-link Polska & Wikipedia-link Polska.

'Tis also the commemoration of Blessed Clemens August von Galen, Bishop (1878-1946, the "Lion of Münster"), Bishop of Münster, who led the Church's resistance against the Nazis' euthanasia programs: Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Münster & Wikipedia-link against Euthanasia.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"We are working for the Kingdom of God, & we do not do so with the gloomy spirit of those who see only insufficiences or perils. We work with the firm trust of those who know that they can count on the victory of Christ."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, feast day: 22 October)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"Jesus prefers leaving me in darkness to giving me a false light which would not be Himself."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"How sweet will be the death of those who have done penance for all their sins so that they will not have any purgatory!"
—St. Teresa of Ávila, Doctor of the Church (1515-1582, feast day: 15 October)

Thursday, March 21, 2019

The Explorers' Club, № DCLXXVIII

Operation AXIOM: After the World War
21 March 1919: The Hungarian Soviet Republic was founded—Led by Béla Kun, an associate of Lenin's, Hungarian Communists infiltrated the government of Mihály Károlyi through a stealth merger with the Social Democrats; Károlyi was cashiered &, on Lenin's orders received via radio, the Social Democrats, who enjoyed far more popular support than the Communists, were violently purged.




Lest we forget.

Saints + Scripture: Quadragesima

Simplex Edition | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

The Popish Plot
vLent 2019: "Final Four 2019: Judgment"


Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Thursday of the Second Week of Lent
The Book of Jeremiah, chapter seventeen, verses five thru ten;
Psalm One, verses one & two, three, & four & six (& Psalm Forty, verse five[a]);
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter sixteen, verses nineteen thru thirty-one.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, today’s Gospel focuses on the parable of the rich man and Lazarus. The rich man "dressed in purple garments and fine linen and dined sumptuously each day," while lying at his door was a poor man named Lazarus, "who would gladly have eaten his fill of the scraps that fell from the rich man’s table. "

God is not pleased with this kind of economic inequality, and he burns with a passion to set things right. This theme came roaring up out of the Bible and into the Christian tradition, and it echoes up and down the centuries. Even though it makes us uncomfortable—and God knows it does, especially those of us who live in the most affluent society in the world—we can’t avoid it because it’s everywhere in the Bible.

St. Thomas Aquinas says that we must distinguish between ownership and use of private property. We have a right to ownership through our hard work, through our inheritance. Fair enough. But with regard to the use of those things—how we use them, why we use them—then, says Thomas, we must always be concerned first for the common good and not our own. This especially includes Lazarus at our gate: those who are suffering and most in need.

Reflect: How do you understand the "common good"? How do you use your personal property for that good?
Video reflection by Father Roger Lopez, O.F.M.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 60
The Book of Exodus, chapter twenty-five, verses thirty-one thru forty.

Commentary: The Lampstand (Exodus, 25:31-40).

'Tis the commemoration of Saint Enda of Aran, Priest & Abbot (circa 450-530; A.K.A. Éanna, Endeus, etc.), founding abbot of the Abbey of Killeaney: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Abbey.

Commentary: Wayback Machine. Brother of St. Fanchea of Rossory [1 January].

'Tis also the commemoration of Saint Nicholas of Flüe, Hermit (1417-1487, A.K.A. Brother Klaus): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the commemoration of Blessed Thomas Pilchard, Priest & Martyr (1557-1587, also spelt Pilcher), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I, one of the Eighty-five Martyrs of England & Wales: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link England & Wales & Wikipedia-link England & Wales.

'Tis also the commemoration of Blessed William Pike, Martyr (died 1591), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I, one of the Eighty-five Martyrs of England & Wales: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link England & Wales & Wikipedia-link England & Wales.

Commentary: Bl. William was converted to the Catholic Faith by Bl. Thomas.

'Tis also the commemoration of Blessed Matthew Flathers, Priest & Martyr (circa 1580-1607, A.K.A. Mathew Major), martyred in the reign of the Anglo-Scottish king James VI & I, one of the Eighty-five Martyrs of England & Wales: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link England & Wales & Wikipedia-link England & Wales.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"The world is often closed in its riches or its power, corroded by conflicts, & drunk with violence or sexual release. It is faith that bestows a liberation & puts the individual's faculties in order."
—Pope St. Paul VI (1897-1978, feast day: 26 September)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"Jesus, hidden in my poor little heart, has once again made me understand how hollow & empty are all passing things."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Let us rest assured that the remembrance of death, like all other blessings, is a gift of God."
—St. John Climacus (579-649, feast day: 30 March)

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Saints + Scripture: Quadragesima

Simplex Edition | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

The Popish Plot
vLent 2019: "Mike's Story: Bad Catholic"


Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Wednesday of the Second Week of Lent
The Book of Jeremiah, chapter eighteen, verses eighteen, nineteen, & twenty;
Psalm Thirty-one, verses five & six, fourteen, & fifteen & sixteen;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter twenty, verses seventeen thru twenty-eight.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, today in our Gospel the mother of James and John asks Jesus on their behalf for high places of authority in his kingdom. Ah, there is the voice of ambition. Some people don’t care at all about money or power or pleasure—but they care passionately about honor. A lot of people can identify with James and John. They want to go places, they want to be movers and shakers in society. Perhaps a number of people reading this reflection are filled with these emotions.

But Jesus turns the tables on them: "You do not know what you are asking." He is indeed a King, and he will indeed rule Israel, but his crown will be made of thorns, and his throne will be a Roman instrument of torture.

And so he tries to clarify: "Can you drink the chalice that I am going to drink?" The key to honor in the kingdom of God is to drink the cup of suffering, to be willing to suffer out of love, to give one’s life away as a gift. Look at the lives of the saints. It is not about aggrandizing the ego but emptying it out.

Reflect: What role do honor and recognition have in your happiness?
Video reflection by Jem Sullivan, Ph.D.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 59
The Book of Exodus, chapter twenty-five, verses twenty-three thru thirty.

Commentary: The Table for the Bread of the Presence (Exodus, 25:23-30).

'Tis the commemoration of Saint Cuthbert of Lindisfarne, Bishop & Abbot, O.S.B. (circa 634-687), abbot of Melrose Abbey & then Lindisfarne Priory, then Bishop of Hexham & later Bishop of Lindisfarne: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Melrose & Wikipedia-link Holy Island; & Diocese-link Hexham, Wikipedia-link Hexham, Diocese-link Lindisfarne, & Wikipedia-link Bishopric.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Tis also the commemoration of Saint Wulfram of Sens, Bishop, O.S.B. (circa 640-703; A.K.A. of Fontenelle, also spelt Vulfran, etc.), Archbishop of Sens: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Diocese-link Sens & Wikipedia-link Sens.

'Tis also the commemoration of Saint Clement of Ireland (circa 750-818, A.K.A. Clemens Scotus): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the commemoration of Blessed John of Parma, Priest, O.F.M. (circa 1209-1289, A.K.A. Giovanni Buralli), seventh (VII) Minister General of the Order of Friars Minor: Blessed-link ūnus, Blessed-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Ministers General.

'Tis also the commemoration of Blessed Marco of Montegallo, Priest, O.F.M. (circa 1425-1497): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"This is me, a sinner on whom the Lord has turned His gaze. And this is what I said when they asked me if I would accept my election as pontiff. I am a sinner, but I trust in the infinite mercy & patience of our Lord Jesus Christ, & I accept in a spirit of penance."
—Pope Francis (born 1936, reigning since 2013)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"I thank You, O my God, for all the graces You have given me."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"The spirituality of work consists in the awareness that through our work, we can place ourselves in a relation with our ultimate destiny. We can become an ally of the living God."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, feast day: 22 October)

Operation ÖSTERREICH: Exodus 90, Day 59

Weekly Wednesday Weigh-in
Last weigh-in: 322.0 lbs
This weigh-in: 314.6 lbs.
Difference: -7.4 lbs.

New record lows in each of the last two weeks; so, clearly, some or another catastrophe must be on the horizon.

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Saints + Scripture: Solemnity of Saint Joseph

The Popish Plot
vLent 2019: "Saint Joseph"

'Tis the Solemnity of Saint Joseph, Husband of the Blessed Virgin Mary (floruit first century B.C.-first century A.D., prior to 33; of Nazareth): Guardian-link ūnus, Guardian-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Saint Joseph's Day.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
Legal father of Jesus Christ. Spouse of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Prince & patron of the Universal Church.
Quoth
Minute Meditations from the Popes:
Joseph, spouse of the Virgin Mother of God, teach me increasingly all the Divine truth & all the human dignity contained in the vocation of spouses & parents.
Wikipedia-link Josephology & Wikipedia-link
Redemptoris custos.


Scripture of This Day
Mass Readings—Solemnity of St. Joseph
The Second Book of Samuel, chapter seven, verses four, five(a), twelve, thirteen, fourteen(a), & sixteen;
Psalm Eighty-nine, verses two & three, four & five, & twenty-seven & twenty-nine;
The Letter to the Romans, chapter four, verses thirteen, sixteen, seventeen, eighteen, & twenty-two;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter one, verses sixteen, eighteen thru twenty-one, & twenty-four(a);
or, the Gospel according to Luke, chapter two, verses forty-one thru fifty-one(a).

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, today’s Gospel centers on the intriguing figure of Joseph. Joseph is one of the most beloved of the saints, featured in countless works of art and prominent in the devotional lives of many.

We know almost nothing about him, yet some very powerful spiritual themes emerge in the accounts of Joseph. He had become betrothed to Mary, and this union had been blessed by God. And then he finds that his betrothed is pregnant.

This must have been an emotional maelstrom for him. And, at a deeper level, it is a spiritual crisis. What does God want him to do? Then the angel appears to him in a dream and tells him, "Joseph, son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary your wife into your home." He realizes at that moment that these puzzling events are part of a much greater plan of God’s. What appears to be a disaster from his perspective is meaningful from God’s perspective.

Joseph was willing to cooperate with the divine plan, though he in no way knew its contours or deepest purpose. Like Mary at the Annunciation, he trusted and let himself be led.

Reflect: In what situation, right now, are you having difficulty trusting and letting yourself be led?
Video reflection by Father Greg Friedman, O.F.M.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 58
The Book of Exodus, chapter twenty-five, verses ten thru twenty-two.

Commentary: The Ark of the Covenant (Exodus, 25:10-22).

Papal Quote o' This Day
"Joseph obeyed. Filled with joy, he offered up the tremendous human sacrifice that was asked of him. He would be the father of the one born not of flesh, but from love. He was publicly the husband, but really only the guardian, the witness & defender of the immaculate virginity & the Divine Maternity of Mary."
—Pope St. John XXIII (1881-1963, feast day: 11 October)
Little Flower Quote o' This Day
"St. Joseph, how I love him! What does me a lot of good when I think of the Holy Family is to imagine a life that was very ordinary, just like our own."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' This Day
"He was chosen by the eternal Father as the trustworthy guardian & protector of His greatest treasures, namely, His divine Son & Mary, Joseph’s wife. He carried out this vocation with complete fidelity until at last God called him, saying ‘Good & faithful servant, enter into the joy of your Lord.'"
—St. Bernardine of Siena (1380-1444, feast day: 20 May)

Saints + Scripture: Quadragesima — Friday, 15 March

The Long Road Back, Part I of III | Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

The Popish Plot
vLent 2019: "Penal Substitution"


Scripture of That Day
Mass Readings—Friday of the First Week of Lent
The Book of Ezra, chapter eighteen, verses twenty-one thru twenty-eight;
Psalm One Hundred Thirty, verses one & two; three & four; five, six, & seven(a); & seven(b/c) & eight;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter five, verses twenty thru twenty-six.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, today’s Gospel passage is an excerpt from the Sermon on the Mount. If we are to begin to understand Jesus’ staggering teachings in the Sermon on the Mount, we have to keep ever in our minds the little tagline: "Be perfect as your heavenly Father is perfect."

Jesus is the Son of God, and his purpose is not primarily to construct a smooth-functioning human society; it is to establish the kingdom of God—that is to say, a body formed by those who participate in him, who share his relationship with the Father.

What is the Father of Jesus Christ like? The Father of Jesus Christ is love, right through. That’s all God is; that’s all he knows how to do. He is not like us: unstable, changing, moving from one attitude to another. No, God simply is love.

Why should you go beyond simply loving those who love you? Because that’s the way God operates: he loves the saints and he also loves the worst sinner in hell. Now, is that easy to do? Of course not. But that’s what Jesus call us to: be perfect as your heavenly Father is perfect.

Reflect: In this passage, Jesus warns about the deadly sin of anger. When was the last time you were angry? Was it being angry for justice or was it selfish or vengeful?
Video reflection by D. J. Bernal: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 54
The Book of Exodus, chapter twenty-three, verses twenty thru thirty-three.

Commentary: The Conquest of Canaan Promised (Exodus, 23:20-33).

Friday, 15 March was the commemoration of Saint Aristobulus of Brittannia, Bishop & Martyr (died circa 55), martyred in the reign of the Roman emperor Nero: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Brother of the apostle St. Barnabas [11 June].

'Twas also the commemoration of Saint Zachary, Pope (circa 679-752, also spelt Zacharias), ninety-first (XCI) Bishop of Rome & last pontiff of the Byzantine Papacy: Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Pontiff-link & Wikipedia-link Pontiff; Wikipedia-link Byzantine.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Twas also the commemoration of Blessed William Hart, Priest & Martyr (1558-1583), martyred in the reign of the English queen Elizabeth I, one of the one hundred sixty Martyrs of Douai: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link Douai & Wikipedia-link Douai.

'Twas also the commemoration of Saint Louise de Marillac, Religious, D.C. (1591-1660, A.K.A. Louise Le Gras), co-foundress of the Daughters of Charity (D.C.), formally the Company of the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul: Saint-link ūna, Saint-link duæ, & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link D.C.

'Twas also the commemoration of Saint Clement Mary Hofbauer, Priest, C.Ss.R. (1751-1820, the "Second Founder of the Redemptorists" & the "Apostle of Vienna;" A.K.A. Johannes Hofbauer): Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Order-link C.Ss.R., & Wikipedia-link C.Ss.R.

'Twas also the commemoration of Blessed Jan Wojciech Balicki, Priest (1869-1948): Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

Papal Quote o' That Day
"We cannot live without hope. We have to have some purpose in our life, some meaning to our existence. We have to aspire to something. Without hope, we begin to die. Hope comes from God, from our belief in God."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, feast day: 22 October)
Little Flower Quote o' That Day
"If I have suffering unrelieved by any gleam of comfort, I manage to make that my joy."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' That Day
"Consider that death may meet you in the morning; or at evening, that you may sink to rest with the sun…."
—St. Francis de Sales, Doctor of the Church (1567-1622, feast day: 24 January)

Monday, March 18, 2019

Saints + Scripture: Quadragesima

The Popish Plot
vLent 2019: "Memento Mori: St. Cyril of Jerusalem"


Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Monday of the Second Week of Lent
The Book of Daniel, chapter nine, verses four(b) thru ten;
Psalm Seventy-nine, verses eight, nine, & eleven & thirteen;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter six, verses thirty-six, thirty-seven, & thirty-eight.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel Jesus calls us to "be merciful, just as your Father is merciful."

Mercy or tender compassion (
chesed in the Hebrew of the Old Testament) is God’s most distinctive characteristic. St. Augustine reminded us that we are, by our very nature, ordered to God. But since God is tender mercy, "having" God is tantamount to exercising compassion, being merciful ourselves.

And attend to what Jesus says next: "Stop judging and you will not be judged. Stop condemning and you will not be condemned. Forgive and you will be forgiven. Give and gifts will be given to you." According to the "physics" of the spiritual order, the more one draws on the divine life, the more one receives that life, precisely because it is a gift and is properly infinite. God’s life is had, as it were, on the fly: when you receive it as a gift, you must give it away, since it only exists in gift form, and then you will find more of it flooding into your heart.

If you want to be happy, Jesus is saying, this divine love, this
chesed of God, must be central to your life; it must be your beginning, your middle, and your end.

Reflect: How does judging others, even those you love, block love?
Video reflection by Monsignor James Vlaun: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Mass Readings—Optional Memorial of St. Cyril of Jerusalem
The First Letter of John, chapter five, verses one thru five;
Psalm Nineteen, verses eight, nine, ten, & eleven (& the Gospel according to John, chapter six, verse sixty-three);
The Gospel according to John, chapter fifteen, verses one thru eight.

Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 57
The Book of Exodus, chapter twenty-five, verses one thru nine.

Commentary: Offerings for the Tabernacle (Exodus, 25:1-9).

Today is Day 57. One of the brothers joked, "Happy Heinz Day!"


'Tis the Optional Memorial of Saint Cyril of Jerusalem, Bishop & Doctor of the Church (circa 313-386), who attended the First Council of Constantinople (381), which refined & reaffirmed the Nicene Creed: Doctor-link ūnus, Doctor-link duo, & Wikipedia-link; Doctors-link & Wikipedia-link Doctors; & Council-link, Wikipedia-link Council, & Wikipedia-link Creed.


Commentary: Wayback Machine. Quoth the Holy Redeemer bulletin:
About the end of A.D. 350 he succeeded [St.] Maximus [5 May] as Bishop of Jerusalem, but was exiled on more than one occasion due to the enmity of Acacius of Caesarea, & the politics of various emperors. Cyril left important writings documenting the instruction of catechumans & the order of the liturgy in his day.
'Tis also the commemoration of Saint Edward the Martyr (circa 962-978), King of England, martyred at the behest of his wicked stepmother, the queen dowager Ælfthryth: Martyr-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the commemoration of Saint Salvador of Horta, Religious, O.F.M. (1520-1567; A.K.A. Salvador Pladevall i Bien, also spelt Salvator): Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the commemoration of Blesseds John Thules, Priest, & Roger Wrenno, Martyrs (died 1616, also spelt Thulis), martyred in the reign of the Anglo-Scottish king James VI & I, two of the Eighty-five Martyrs of England & Wales: Martyr-link Juliett Tango, Martyr-link Romeo Whiskey, & Wikipedia-link; Martyrs-link England & Wales & Wikipedia-link England & Wales.

'Tis also the commemoration of Blessed Celestine of the Mother of God, Religious (1848-1925, A.K.A. Maria Anna Donati), foundress of the Calasanzian Sisters, formally the Daughters of the Poor of Saint Joseph Calasanzio: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

Papal Quote o' the Day
"If we are to respect people in their integrity, we must educate them to do good with a sense of responsibility; with a capacity for self-discipline & also with the external help of law & authority."
—Pope St. Paul VI (1897-1978, feast day: 26 September)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"Turn your eyes back upon yourself, & you will not judge the doings of others."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"Since Christ Himself has said, 'This is My Body' who shall dare to doubt that It is His Body?"
—St. Cyril of Jerusalem, Doctor of the Church (313-386, feast day: 18 March)

Thursday, March 14, 2019

The Rebel Black Dot Exodus 90 Song o' the Day

Ellie Holcomb, "Find You Here" from Red Sea Road (The Last Angry Exodus Man)

Bonus! Song o' 1701
The Firm, "Star Trekkin'" from Dr. Demento's Hits from Outer Space (The Last Angry Exodus Trekkie)

Captain's Log: This is the one thousand seven hundred first post (1,701) to bear the "R.B.D.S.O.T.D." label. Live long & prosper.

Saints + Scripture: Quadragesima

The Popish Plot
vLent 2019: "Final Four 2019: Death"

'Tis the commemoration of Saint Lazarus of Milan, Bishop (died circa 449), Archbishop of Milan: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Bishops (List), Diocese-link, & Wikipedia-link Diocese.

Commentary: Wayback Machine.

'Tis also the commemoration of Saint Leobinus of Chartres, Bishop & Abbot (died circa 558, also spelt Lubin, etc.): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Bishops (List), Diocese-link, & Wikipedia-link Diocese.

'Tis also the commemoration of Saint Boniface Curetán, Bishop (died circa 660, also spelt Curitan): Saint-link & Wikipedia-link.

'Tis also the commemoration of Saint Matilda of Ringelheim (circa 894-968; A.K.A. of Saxony; also spelt Mathilde, Maud), Queen of the East Franks, foundress of Quedlinburg Abbey: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Abbey.

Commentary: Mother of St. Bruno the Great [11 October] & mother-in-law of St. Adelaide of Italy [16 December].

'Tis also the commemoration of Blessed Giacomo Cusmano, Priest (1834-1888), founder of the "Morsel for the Poor," formally the Congregation of Missionary Servants of the Poor, & the Sisters Servants of the Poor: Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Thursday of the First Week of Lent
The Book of Esther, chapter C, verses twelve, fourteen, fifteen, sixteen, twenty-three, twenty-four, & twenty-five;
Psalm One Hundred Thirty-eight, verses one & two(a/b), two(c/d/e) & three, & seven(c) & eight;
The Gospel according to Matthew, chapter seven, verses seven thru twelve.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, today’s Gospel assures us of the power of prayer. When some people ask in a spirit of trust, really believing that what they are asking for will happen, it happens. Just as Jesus suggests in the Gospel, “Everyone who asks, receives; and the one who seeks, finds; and to the one who knocks, the door will be opened.”

The power of prayer is the confidence that we are being guided and cared for, even when that guidance and care are not immediately apparent. It is what allows someone to live in detachment from all of the ups and downs of life. In the language of Ignatius: “Lord, I don’t care whether I have a long life or a short life, whether I am rich or poor, whether I am healthy or sick.”

Someone that lives in that kind of detachment is free, and because they are free, they are powerful. They are beyond the threats that arise in the context of this world. This is the source of
dynamis, real power. This is the power that Martin Luther King, Dorothy Day, and John Paul II wielded: world-changing power.

Reflect: Can you honestly say with St. Ignatius: “Lord, I don’t care whether I have a long life or a short life, whether I am rich or poor, whether I am healthy or sick”? Why or why not?
Video reflection by Monsignor James C. Vlaun: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 53
The Book of Exodus, chapter twenty-three, verses ten thru nineteen.

Commentary: The Sabbatical Year & the Sabbath (Exodus, 23:10-13) & Annual Feasts (Exodus, 23:14-19).

Proverb o' the Day (Proverbs, 5:3-6)
For the lips of a loose woman drip honey,
and her speech is smoother than oil;
but in the end she is bitter as wormwood,
sharp as a two-edged sword.
Her feet go down to death;
her steps follow the path to Sheol;
she does not take heed to the path of life;
her ways wander, and she does not know it.
Papal Quote o' the Day
"In the face of the phenomenon of the diminished number of those consecrated to the priesthood & the religious life, we cannot remain passive, not doing much as we possibly can. Above all, we can pray very much."
—Pope St. John Paul II the Great (1920-2005, feast day: 22 October)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"I am quite resigned to live or to die, I am even willing to recover & go to Cochin-China if it is God's will."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"If we fear not death, we shall entirely escape from death."
—St. John Chrysostom, Doctor of the Church (349-407, feast day:13 September)

Saints + Scripture: Complex Editions

I've complicated all the episodes in the recent, regrettable spate of "Simplex Editions." Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea máxima culpa!

Wayback Machine — Saturday, 2 March

Wayback Machine — Sunday, 3 March

Wayback Machine — Saturday, 9 March

Wayback Machine — Sunday, 10 March

Wayback Machine — Wednesday, 13 March

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Saints + Scripture: Quadragesima

Simplex Edition

The Popish Plot
vLent 2019: "Mike's Story: Cradle Catholic"

'Tis the commemoration of Saint Leander of Seville, Bishop (circa 534-601): Saint-link ūnus, Saint-link duo, & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Wayback Machine. Brother of the bishops St. Isidore of Seville [4 April], a Doctor of the Church, & St. Fulgentius of Ecija [14 January], & the virgin St. Florentina of Cartagena [28 August].

'Tis also the commemoration of Saint Gerald of Mayo, Abbot (died 731), inaugural abbot of the Abbey of Mayo: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Wikipedia-link Abbey.

'Tis also the commemoration of Saint Nikephoros of Constantinople, Bishop (circa 758-828, Patriarch Nikephoros I; also spelt Nicephorus), who opposed the second bout of the Byzantine iconoclastic heresy: Saint-link & Wikipedia-link; Heresy-link & Wikipedia-link Heresy.

'Tis also the commemoration of Saints Rudericus, Priest, & Saloman, Martyrs (died 857), martyred in the reign of the Andalusian king Muhammad I, two of the forty-eight Martyrs of Córdoba: Martyr-link Romeo, Martyr-link Sierra, & Wikipedia-link (List); Wikipedia-link Córdoba.

'Tis also the commemoration of Blessed Sancha of Alenquer, Religious, O.Cist. (circa 1180-1229), Princess of Portugal, foundress of the Monastery of Celas: Blessed-link & Wikipedia-link.

Commentary: Sister of St. Theresa of Portugal [17 June] & Bl. Mafilda [?].

Scripture of the Day
Mass Readings—Wednesday of the First Week of Lent
The Book of Jonah, chapter three, verses one thru ten;
Psalm Fifty-one, verses three & four, twelve & thirteen, & eighteen & nineteen;
The Gospel according to Luke, chapter eleven, verses twenty-nine thru thirty-two.

Commentary: Reflection by Bishop Robert Barron (Word on Fire):
Friends, in today’s Gospel Jesus tells the crowds who seek a sign that they will only receive the sign of Jonah: "Just as Jonah became a sign to the Ninevites, so will the Son of Man be to this generation."

Jonah is called by God to preach to Nineveh, which is described as an enormously large city. It takes, they say, three days to walk through it. I can’t help but think of Nineveh as one of our large, modern cities, a center of all sorts of worldly activity and preoccupation.

What would its conversion look like? A turning back to God as the only enduring good. After hearing the word of Jonah, the Ninevites proclaim a fast, and all of them, great and small, put on sackcloth. What is the purpose of these ascetic practices? To wean people away from an attachment to worldly pleasures.

Go beyond the mind that you have. Repent. Live as though nothing in this world finally matters. And you will be living in the kingdom of God!

Reflect: How is fasting tied to repentance? What is a contemporary version of "putting on sackcloth and ashes"?
Video reflection by Jem Sullivan, Ph.D.: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.


Scripture Study—Exodus 90: Day 52
The Book of Exodus, chapter twenty-two, verse seven thru chapter twenty-three, verse nine.

Commentary: Laws of Restitution (cont'd; Exodus, 22:7-15), Social & Religious Laws (Exodus, 22:16-31), & Laws concerning Justice (Exodus, 23:1-9).

Papal Quote o' the Day
"Following God's way leads to life, whereas following idols leads to death."
—Pope Francis (born 1936, reigning since 2013)
Little Flower Quote o' the Day
"Our Lord died on the Cross in agony, & yet this is the most beautiful death of love. To die of love is not to die in transports."
—St. Thérèse of Lisieux, Doctor of the Church (1873-1897, feast day: 1 October)
Saint Quote o' the Day
"This is the time to act, to do. A Church that chooses to remain inactive could not possibly be a faithful Church. It would not be a living Church. It could neither confront nor overcome the difficulties that we face in our days."
—Pope St. John XXIII (1881-1963, feast day: 11 October)